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Yesterday I changed the oil (Mobile 1 0w20) and oil filter (Honda), rotated the tires (Michelin Premier LTX), and changed the rear differential fluid (Acura DPSF - just under 3 quarts). As always, I did the work myself out of convenience, it's less hassle to do it myself than to take it somewhere and wait, and to assure it was done and done correctly - there are horror stories of the quickie lube type places and even dealers mess up - I think they must put their least experienced or least diligent people on the tasks of oil changes, tire rotations, etc.

I did the above after getting the A16 code on the Maint Minder.

The oil life left was 15% and the miles since my last change was 6811 so for this interval, if I had gone to 0%, I expect that would've happened at around 8K miles. I've hit 0% before and it was right around 10K miles and most of my intervals would've gone from 100% to 0% at 10K miles (but I always change at 5%-15% except the one time I got caught out on a road trip). This last interval was unique in that it's the first one that didn't encompass long road trips - it was all fairly short drives a few exits on the freeway and suburbia driving. The oil life was clearly affected by the type of driving - about 2K miles shorter life than when I have some long road trips in the interval. This is all expected.
 

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Looking good! I'm not use to driving down the road and seeing trees so close. We usually see the horizon on most roads in New Mexico.
In much of the country it's like driving in a monotonous tunnel where all you really see are trees lining the highway corridor. The northeast and southeast and midwest can be especially so. I like trees but the monotony of driving lots of miles in the same looking corridor gets old fast. I'd take driving in New Mexico or most of the western part of the country any day.

I'm not taking anything away from datatech's drive - I'm sure it was nice.
 

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I will be testing out the max range the MDX can do, using the FL Turnpike with filling up at Costco in Orlando and making the round trip to Miami and back.
I don't understand the point of trying to do a 'max run' unless the possibility of being stranded is a thrilling experience for you. It doesn't really mean anything since the efficiency of the vehicle and corresponding range/tank will vary with virtually every drive based on the route taken, topography, winds, temperature, traffic, load, tire pressure/type, etc.

I've done a number of coast to coast trips in the MDX and the range varies with every fillup - and while I've often refueled after the 'low fuel' indicator came on, I've never been inclined to push it right up to max because there's no point to it and I don't want to be stranded. In much of the country, especially the southwest where there can be long distances between stations, I take care to not get too low on fuel.

Of course the whole idea of it was covered in a Seinfeld episode where Kramer got a thrill out of doing just what we're talking about while on a test drive with a car salesman.

I must be missing something in what you're really trying to accomplish. Maybe you just want to get an idea of 'typical safe range when cruising on a freeway'?
 

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My max run so far is 454 miles for 18.5 gals of 91 octane at 24.5 mpg
Although it might be considered cheating a bit - if the goal is to get over 500 miles for some reason that makes no sense to me, then it'd be easy enough to just carry a gas can with 2-3 gallons of gas along with and then go ahead and push it until the 500 miles is exceeded or it runs out of gas.
 

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Its definitely cheating. The whole point is to try to achieve 500 miles on a single tank of fuel without filling up during any point of the run.
But the extra gas in the can wouldn't be used unless you already lost the game and ran out before the 500 miles. You'd still get to see if you can hit that artificial 500 mile goal on just the one tank. I don't think it'd be cheating - it'd just be insurance.

Zero point to it all. Just mindless entertainment on a otherwise boring day of straight driving.
It could go from boring to very exciting quite fast depending on where you are when you run out of gas.

In trying to achieve this goal I hope neither of you will be one of the annoying hyper-milers who are simply in the way of everyone else.
 

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Yesterday I drove the car back to California. Managed 28mpg (indicated) during the 790 mile trip with the cruise set at 80, which is average for me.
Glad to have the X back in the canyons where there aren't any straight roads. First time in a while I've given the SH-AWD a real workout. Put a smile on my face.
We're almost in sync. Yesterday I drove 750 miles from San Diego to Phoenix and back all in the same day. According to the trip computer I got 26.2 mpg on the way there and 27.2 mpg on the way back. This was with the cruise set an around 79 in Arizona and 75 in California for most of it. I also enjoyed the great twisties on I-8 east of San Diego in that area with some of the most scenic driving in the country - the area with the mountains of giant boulders.

I saw a number of highway patrol cars in Arizona, none in California.
 

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Agreed! I previously only took I-10 when driving between Phoenix until Google re-routed me on I-8 to avoid traffic. I never realized how much scenery I was missing and the drive is more engaging overall.
Yeah - between Phoenix and San Diego I-8 is a much better trip than 10 regardless of what routing apps say on the mileage. There's way less traffic, better scenery, and a more pleasant trip. But don't tell anyone or else it might be ruined by more traffic. I've done the trip a lot of times.
 

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Replaced the cabin air filter, after 11,000 miles. It wasn't too bad, but I prefer to waste money doing them too often vs letting it get nasty.
This is a super easy DIY and one that is easy to forget. As you're reminding people, the filters can get nasty pretty quickly, reminding us of how useful they are for our breathing.

I encourage even non-DIY people to give this one a shot - the filter is easily replaced inside the vehicle via the glove box - no grease, no heavy lifting, no special tools, etc.
 

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Timing belt with water pump and idler pulleys, drain/fill x3 transmission, AWD fluid change, PTO fluid change, new trans cooler and trans filter, new accessory belt. cleaned the battery connections, rotated the tires, new cabin filter, wash and vacuum. All DIY in my garage. Immediately took it on a 1500 mile trip towing 2500 lbs. Did great! Ready for the second 100K miles.
I think you win the 'what did you do to your MDX today' thread for the week, or month.
 

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I've hit that horrible milestone on the MDX. $100 for OC w/ Filter and TR!
My oil and filter change and tire rotation costs me roughly $32. That includes Mobile 1 full syn 0w-20 and an Acura oil filter with new washer - and I don't even need to drop it off at a dealer or pick it up. Of course, I do the work myself.

You're so into your vehicles I suggest starting to learn to do some of the simpler maintenance on them yourself (assuming you haven't done so to date). It's more difficult if you don't have a decent spot to do it in of course, but you'll start to learn more about the mechanics of a vehicle which will save you money directly (32 versus 100 in this example) and indirectly as well since you'll be able to communicate with mechanics better and know when someone like a service advisor is telling you that you need service you don't really need - and you'll figure out many/most service advisors don't really know the mechanics of a vehicle. Just make sure you do it safely with jackstands, etc., and recycle the oil and filters at a nearby auto parts store. I save mine up so I don't have to go to an auto parts store every oil change.
 

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Plan is to either run this vehicle to the ground or just dump more money to run it until I hit 1 million + miles. Then probs sell this back to Acura to display in the Lincoln, AL plant with the high mileage.
With all of the vehicles you plan on buying and owning I seriously doubt you'd ever come anywhere near 1M miles on this one, even if you actually kept it long term.

My 2014 MDX with about 78K miles has been out of warranty for awhile (I don't do extended warranties). It's still fine and hasn't needed anything other than routine maintenance, which isn't covered by a warranty anyway (and I do the work myself).

I've crossed 100K on every vehicle I've ever owned - 200K and more on some of them. Most people churn vehicles far more frequently than necessary as far as the vehicle's ability to keep operating goes. Usually they just 'want' something newer or different - it's not usually due to the old vehicle's ability to keep going with some possible repairs every now and then along the way, which is usually way cheaper than the cost of a new vehicle.
 

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Those vehicles will come and go. This one is a keeper. We tend to keep vehicles longer that is a Honda. Had we not sold that Odyssey, I swear that van would have hit 300k miles easily.
Do the math. The average number of miles per year for a car is around 15K for most people. This means it takes 10 years for 150K miles. That extrapolates to 67 years of 15k miles/year to get to 1M miles. That assumes this is the only vehicle driven for any of those miles. If you have other vehicles available you'll drive those also. You say you're buying a Type S MDX. I can't imagine buying one of those and then never driving it - it'd be a huge waste of money. Moreover, a type S will surely be more fun to drive than the MDX you have so you'd likely drive it way more. And then I think you talked about getting a pickup truck to haul things - maybe a Rivian or something, yet another very expensive choice (but maybe I'm thinking of someone else re the Rivian). That vehicle would be driven as well reducing any miles you'd put on your current MDX. And those are just a few of the vehicles you're talking about getting imminently. I'm sure next year, a few years from now, certainly within 10 years and absolutely within 67 years you'll be talking about getting many other vehicles.

There are very few people who would hit 1M miles on a vehicle. It's usually limited to people like salespeople who drive a tremendous number of miles per year and also have the desire and discipline to put all those miles on the same vehicle, repairing as necessary.

I've probably had my vehicle I use as a daily driver (not MDX - an old Mustang) longer than anyone else posting on this site. I've been driving it for nearly 40 years and it was old when I bought it. I'm familiar with what it takes to reliably do that but even so, it only has a few hundred K or so on it since I also have another vehicle (MDX) I use for vacations and for my wife to drive.

I'm not trying to douse your enthusiasm - just doing a reality math check.
 

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Just looked at my spreadsheet for fuel I spent this year so far, might do a dedicated thread (might be a rant), cuz $3k didn't even yield me 30k miles this year, whereas in a previous year (not 2020), $3400 yielded 36k miles.
The cost of fuel isn't even noteworthy in comparison to the cost of a new S model MDX. It's just a nit not worthy of tracking or getting excited by hypermiling to get a few more mpg on a tank. I don't understand being willing to pay the high cost for a new MDX, let alone a type S model, yet being this concerned about the cost of gas to the point of tracking it this closely. Of course, it's good to do a budget so in that respect knowing what's spent on fuel is a good idea. Maybe that's what your goal is.

In addition, fuel cost/gal is normally a wide ranging variable - more so than the mileage of the vehicle. You said your gas just crossed over $3/gal whereas in California where I live it's been over $4 for a long time. When I do my cross country trips the cost of fuel varies all over the place with the only constant being that California is always the highest. Just across the state line in Yuma the cost drops significantly and stays low all the way to the east coast and back till I hit California again. That's what outrageous state taxation will do. This variability in the cost/gal would be enough to make the end result of fuel cost/yr vary considerably - and then there's the variable of the miles driven, which aren't usually constant year to year either.
 

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Snow state owners should drop and clean the spare tire every once in a while. I do not believe this one had been off since the car was built in 2014.
Good suggestion.

The problem with the spare is it can fall into 'out of sight, out of mind'.

The other thing to do even for non snow area people like me - check the air pressure of the spare every now and then or else when you go to use it you might find it too low on pressure to drive on. At the same time as topping up the air pressure one can check the condition of the wheel as 'bustedknuckles' suggests.
 

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I only have to check it a few times a year
I think checking a few times a year is adequate for any type of spare. Being down a few psi isn't a big deal. The problem is that some people go years without checking it. An acquaintance found out about this the hard way when he had a flat and went to replace it with the spare only to discover the spare was not inflated nearly enough to use. I suggested to him to check it a few times per year from now on and to buy and carry an inflator just in case (which I also have).
 
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