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Discussion Starter #1
I tried searching, but I did not find anything to help me.


I still have a '14 Advanced. Until recently, the TPMS was pretty much accurate to the actual tire inflation. Now it seems that although each tire is filled to 35 psi, the dash says they are at 45. Yes, I have very accurate gauge and I verified it is correct. No, tire change or rotation recently.



Is there a procedure that can re-calibrate the sensors?
 

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My first assumption would be the batteries in the TPMS units are affecting this - they're getting old now. Do they all do it and was it sudden? It seems that if it was the batteries it'd be perhaps gradual and perhaps some exhibiting the issue and some not - but it all could vary.

Just as one data point - the TPMS in my 2014 MDX, built June 2013, are on the original batteries and are still accurate but this is an area that can be affected by environmental conditions and I live in an ideal environment as far as temperature goes.
 

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Generally speaking TPMS batteries are suppose to be changed each time you instal new tires. I have gottem more life out of them, but.......
 

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Generally speaking TPMS batteries are suppose to be changed each time you instal new tires. I have gottem more life out of them, but.......
Never heard of that generalized concept.

Typical life of the batteries in the TPMS sensors are around 8 to 10 years. This 24 month variance is due to the conditions the vehicle is driven. These sensors are always powered and there is no ON or OFF for them, which means they drain all the time.
Also, you cannot change the batteries in these sensors, or for most sensors for that matter. I know there are hackjob tutorials out there, but when these sensors can be purchased for $25 to $30 each, it is no brainer to change them all together, rather than just the battery by hacking it open.

I live in NJ and my TPMS sensors have 220K miles on them. I am yet to have any issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looks like these sensors are sealed, so I am not sure how one could possibly replace the batteries in them. Rock Auto seems to have a nice selection of OEM and aftermarket replacements. Guess I replace them all next time I change tires.

But what concerns me is that these replacements could have been sitting on the shelf for 5 years and since they would be sealed I assume the battery would have been on all that time? So I might be replacing sensors with dying batteries for another set with dying batteries!
 

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I just had winter tires installed on new wheels with new sensors. Tire shop and dealer both quoted me a charge for "wakening" or "activating" the sensors. They say they come shut off. I thought it was a money grab but everyone is doing it so who knows.
 

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But what concerns me is that these replacements could have been sitting on the shelf for 5 years and since they would be sealed I assume the battery would have been on all that time? So I might be replacing sensors with dying batteries for another set with dying batteries!

I just bought new winter wheels and tires this week. I also bought 4 new sensors with them. The sensors do not “wake up” until they are programmed for the first time.

In years past dealers could charge an arm and a first born for OEM sensors. But now a days a local mechanic with the proper tools can buy sensors in bulk and then program them for a particular make of vehicle. Most sensors are dual frequency and can be programmed to work with almost any vehicle on the road. Cost me $40 a sensor... Canadian. So that’s like $0.30 USD!

I would also add that I’ve owned vehicles with TPMS sensors in the tires now going back at least 15 years. My vehicles were never new when I purchase them, always 3-4 years old. Yet, I have never owned a vehicle where the sensors have “died”. So, all that to say that the life expectancy of 8-10 years is probably not far from the truth and has proven true in my case.

There are scanners that can pick up a sensors readings. I believe they can also access the S/N of the sensors and in some cases even the “health” of it. Might look into finding a local mechanic with such tools to check them before replacing them.



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In years past dealers could charge an arm and a first born for OEM sensors. But now a days a local mechanic with the proper tools can buy sensors in bulk and then program them for a particular make of vehicle. Most sensors are dual frequency and can be programmed to work with almost any vehicle on the road. Cost me $40 a sensor... Canadian. So that’s like $0.30 USD!
For the fun of it I checked the cost of the sensors online from Acura (oemacuraparts) and it indicates they're $38.38 full retail and their online cost is $26.87, so not too bad if it only needs to be done rarely.

I'm expecting Flame Red to post back a procedure he used to replace the actual batteries, given other mods he's made in the past.

I'd suspect something other than the sensors though if suddenly all 4 wheels indicated the 10 psi off. Just the random chance that all 4 of the independent sensors would hit that point at the same time seems very low. If they truly all 4 indicated this suddenly I'd suspect some other cause. The idea of using an independent scanner to test it is a good one,if one can find one. If one has access to another MDX, or perhaps other Acura/Honda that uses TPMS they might be able to test it by removing the wheel of the one vehicle and placing the wheel of the MDX on the test vehicle (just setting it on the wheel studs) to see if that test MDX indicates the same high value.

I'd like to hear what the final resolution is so hopefully Flame Red will post back on this. I suppose at some point the ones in my 2014 will fail as well although if they last long enough to make it to the next tire change I may just change them at that time since it'll probably be at the 8-10 year point by then.
 

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If one has access to another MDX, or perhaps other Acura/Honda that uses TPMS they might be able to test it by removing the wheel of the one vehicle and placing the wheel of the MDX on the test vehicle (just setting it on the wheel studs) to see if that test MDX indicates the same high value.

I believe the vehicle actually has to be driven for a period of time before the vehicle will identify a new sensor on the wheel. But still could be a valid idea, to see if the problem follows the vehicle or the sensors.



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^^ I think that might be correct - it might require some driving to activate the TPMS in the first place - according to some of the articles I've read. It seems that different sensors/vehicles work in different ways so I don't know what the actual requirement of the MDX is.

It's at least a better system than the Toyota Camry I rented recently where the 'Check Tires' (or something like that) light was on for the entire 1K or so miles I drove it. Lots of Toyotas are very fussy in this area and routinely have the light on despite no real tire pressure issues but I think they use a crude method to infer a possible tire pressure issue rather than an actual pressure sensor.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I had the TPMS sensors replaced and new tires installed. Rock Auto sells OEM at half what a tire shop or Stealership does, under $30 each plus a couple of bucks for shipping.

The tech that installed them said he has seen sensor loose accuracy start at 65k miles. I have 50k. They connect, just that their accuracy is not great. They cannot be recalibrated or batteries changed. He had a scanner that beeped when it woke up each sensor, and then he plugged the scanner into the OBD to upload the serial numbers to the car. Then drove it about 15 minutes, and the TPMS warning disappeared

Once again, they read properly.
 

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I had the TPMS sensors replaced and new tires installed. Rock Auto sells OEM at half what a tire shop or Stealership does, under $30 each plus a couple of bucks for shipping.

The tech that installed them said he has seen sensor loose accuracy start at 65k miles. I have 50k. They connect, just that their accuracy is not great. They cannot be recalibrated or batteries changed. He had a scanner that beeped when it woke up each sensor, and then he plugged the scanner into the OBD to upload the serial numbers to the car. Then drove it about 15 minutes, and the TPMS warning disappeared

Once again, they read properly.

But he used his gauge to set the tire pressure, right?
 

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Rock Auto sells OEM at half what a tire shop or Stealership does, under $30 each plus a couple of bucks for shipping.
That's around what Acura dealers sell them for online so I don't understand the 'half what a dealer sells for' comment. From my previous checking on this (but I haven't purchased any yet) -

I checked the cost of the sensors online from Acura (oemacuraparts) and it indicates they're $38.38 full retail and their online cost is $26.87, so not too bad if it only needs to be done rarely.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
But he used his gauge to set the tire pressure, right?
Of course.

That's around what Acura dealers sell them for online so I don't understand the 'half what a dealer sells for' comment. From my previous checking on this (but I haven't purchased any yet) -
I called three places locally, they wanted $60-$70 range here, plus one wanted $25 each to "program" them if I bought tires from them! That is why we call them Stealerships here in Florida...

:surprise:
 

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^^ That's pretty bad, essentially charging double full retail price for the parts apparently. They already have plenty of markup in the full retail price.
 
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