Acura MDX SUV Forums banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have seen other related post but they were from 2-5yrs back. So I thought I would submit this to get additional feedback

I have a 2006 Acura MDX with a 120k miles and a after market factory hitch rated to 4500lbs. My local mechanic upgraded one of the coolers ( transmission or power steering and can't remember which and said the factory cooler for the other was quite large and should suffice. In fact the after market cooler wasn't any larger. I'm interested in purchasing a Sanger v210. Boat dry is about 2900lbs. Trailer is 1100 lbs and by the time I add fluids, wakeboard tower and toys I'm looking at a grand total of ~ 4500 lbs which is at the limit. I'm in Northern California and Lake Berryessa is about 60 miles away mostly freeway and not to hilly.

Your thought on this? I believe the tandem trailer has some sort of brakes. I will confirm. What do you recommend I do to ensure safe travels?

We encountered a lot of vibrating with our MDX, as many other owners reported. Our issue was addressed by replacing struts and shocks. I would never have towed until that issue was addressed.

My only concern with the vehicle at this time is the brakes. Coming down a steep hill returning from Yosemite with my family, a Thule on top and only with a bicycle in rear on the bike rack and I had difficulty slowing the vehicle in 2nd applying a lot of brake. For anyone from my whereabouts it was Curch priest and the speed limit is 15mph. Windy and steep. I was nervous. At the bottom of the hill I smelled burning brake pads. This isn't normal, right? Blake fluid is at the correct level and I think brake pads are fine. I'm taking it into my local mechanic to get it checked out.

Thanks in advance for reading and advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,542 Posts
Brakes convert energy to heat, and if you are braking continuously down a steep hill, you're eventually going to get to the point where the pads and rotors aren't very happy with each other, and you're not going to have really good brakes. Adding the weight of a trailer is going to make it that much tougher to keep the brakes cool. Keeping the transmission in the lowest practical gear is a good start, and you're going to want to let the transmission slow the car in between hairpin bends. If you just stay on the brakes all the way, you're going to get them far, far hotter than necessary.

Trailer brakes are a must-have if you're going to be towing a 4500 pound load with an MDX. There are several types, including electronic systems and passive hydraulic systems that activate the trailer brakes when the trailer "pushes on" the hitch.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top