Acura MDX SUV Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Last year around the same time, I had a thread about a flat tire. This time about a tire again, on driver side. Speed was less than 5mph..may be i have to be extra careful when the rains start...

After ordering food in a drive-thru, I stepped on the gas and stoppped right away .. as I instantly realized that I hit the curb (curb was extra curvy or I was not careful enough)
Anyways, my mistake but that less than 5mph did leave a bruise on the wheel which I had to be ok with but the tire's sidewall has a mini gash.

Thin layer of rubber came off , pics attached.
Should I be changing the tire or is it a cosmetic damage only? Planning to get it checked this week but how does it look?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,614 Posts
Last year around the same time, I had a thread about a flat tire. This time about a tire again, on driver side. Speed was less than 5mph..may be i have to be extra careful when the rains start...

After ordering food in a drive-thru, I stepped on the gas and stoppped right away .. as I instantly realized that I hit the curb (curb was extra curvy or I was not careful enough)
Anyways, my mistake but that less than 5mph did leave a bruise on the wheel which I had to be ok with but the tire's sidewall has a mini gash.

Thin layer of rubber came off , pics attached.
Should I be changing the tire or is it a cosmetic damage only? Planning to get it checked this week but how does it look?
I hope you sprung for the tire and wheel protection. I wouldn’t drive on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,107 Posts
It's hard to determine this from the pics - I think you should have a 'tire professional' (not a 19 y/o tire buster at Pep Boys or something) inspect it to determine if it's purely cosmetic or if it may have damaged and weakened your sidewall. Unless it's very clearly cosmetic you might want to just pop for a new tire since otherwise you'll have this nagging worry in the back of your mind every time you drive on a curvy road, or it gets hot, or it gets cold, or you drive in a remote area, or yo drive with the family in the vehicle, etc.

I just bought new tires for the MDX a couple of days ago so I know they're not cheap but the $200 or so for a new tire is very minor compared to the value of the vehicle.

Note - I popped a tire once in Italy by hitting a curb at a very slow speed. It doesn't take much to destroy the sidewall of a tire. Luckily I happened to do it right next to a...tire shop (small hole in the wall place but they had what I needed).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
It's hard to determine this from the pics - I think you should have a 'tire professional' (not a 19 y/o tire buster at Pep Boys or something) inspect it to determine if it's purely cosmetic or if it may have damaged and weakened your sidewall. Unless it's very clearly cosmetic you might want to just pop for a new tire since otherwise you'll have this nagging worry in the back of your mind every time you drive on a curvy road, or it gets hot, or it gets cold, or you drive in a remote area, or yo drive with the family in the vehicle, etc.

I just bought new tires for the MDX a couple of days ago so I know they're not cheap but the $200 or so for a new tire is very minor compared to the value of the vehicle.

Note - I popped a tire once in Italy by hitting a curb at a very slow speed. It doesn't take much to destroy the sidewall of a tire. Luckily I happened to do it right next to a...tire shop (small hole in the wall place but they had what I needed).
I am thinking a dedicated tire shop first but would the dealership have similar expertise as well?

Yeah, I guess even if they said its ok, I am thinking I might have that worry..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I hope you sprung for the tire and wheel protection. I wouldn’t drive on it.
Sadly no, but given my 2 experiences so far with MDX, may be a good idea to get the tire/wheel protection.

I never had any tire/wheel issues with my old TSX. Something about the SUV driving is making me more negligent..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,107 Posts
I never had any tire/wheel issues with my old TSX. Something about the SUV driving is making me more negligent..
The obvious difference is a significant size difference - those curvy curbs at the drive thru are a lot closer to the vehicle when you drive an SUV. You just need to get used to the difference in track width and wheelbase - and just pay extra close attention in the tight spots. The curving curbed track at some drive thrus can be one of the more challenging areas for this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
I bang over those curbs all the time with my manly Michelin Defender LTXs. It's those wimpy Continental tires that are the problem. ( But pay no attention to the scuffs on my wheels... ).

BS aside, another consideration is that if there is substantial wear on the other tires, you should probably replace two tires instead of one, especially if the vehicle is AWD. Maybe store one for the next time?

Hopefully the damage is just cosmetic and this is all academic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,952 Posts
My understanding with AWD is you need to replace them in sets of 4... the old match-per-axle approach doesn’t apply.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
My understanding with AWD is you need to replace them in sets of 4... the old match-per-axle approach doesn’t apply.
If it were only 2-3/32nds of wear difference, I would probably just put new ones on front and skip rotations for a while. SH-AWD is more sophisticated about these things than some other systems, and I think there is no chance of causing damage. If there were more wear, and especially if I didn't like the tires anyway, I might use it as an excuse to get new tires. I do think there are better tires than those Contis, but these tires aren't cheap.

My wife is pretty understanding, but if I told her I needed to get a new set of SUV tires because I got a scuff on a sidewall, I think I would get THE LOOK. :grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
Bringing a sidewall gash to any shop will always warrant the same answer: replace. It's in their best interest.

That being said, technically it's the piles in the tire that hold the pressure but we honestly don't know what kind of damage it has received either, as impacts without gashes can also compromise the pile (tell tale sign is a bulge).

If you ever compare an aircraft tire with a car tire, you'll notice an obvious lack of reinforcing from steel belts on the sidewalls. But they need that for the numerous impacts they have and fun things like crosswind landings causing angled impacts. So all we have left is just the piles and rubber. Add the fact that no two sidewalls are created to flex the same way, then that the general population don't maintain their tire pressures, and then that most people don't even care to check their tires at certain intervals, we usually end up with a nice show of a tire blowout costing us precious time and sometimes physical damage.

Your call, driver in command.



Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
I've had some crappy tires, but where are the "piles" in my tires? :wink:

BS aside, I would cut off that little flap of rubber and see what's lurking behind it. If there are plies cut, that makes the decision very easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
Aye! Yes plies! Lol

Usually if you see a ply, you should be worried already because plies are usually just fabric (i think polyester?).

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
help

I don't think anyone mentioned it, but you could try to contact the tire manufacturer and ask them to help. I did that once (with Goodyear) after pretty much the same thing happened, and they offered to pay 50% of the replacement cost through a Goodyear store. My gash, though, seemed quite a bit deeper than yours, so there was no question about replacement. Goodyear (the company) called Goodyear dealer and asked them to inspect the tire and then call them. The dealer had already seen the issue and we made an appointment. Dealer ordered the tire and when I had the appointment, they called Goodyear and they OK'd the 50% assistance, and I got my car back that same day. Goodyear's customer service was excellent, in this case at least. You may not have similar results but you have nothing to lose by trying it, other than a bit of phone time. These were OEM tires (265/50-20) so they did not have a road hazard warranty. VERY nice of Goodyear. Give it a shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Aye! Yes plies! Lol

Usually if you see a ply, you should be worried already because plies are usually just fabric (i think polyester?).

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
No plies. I just see more of the sidewall..It looks like a superficial horizontal knife cut but may be a little more than that..
anyways, not worried about the blowout on the city roads. I am not going on highways until I get it checked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
If it were only 2-3/32nds of wear difference, I would probably just put new ones on front and skip rotations for a while. SH-AWD is more sophisticated about these things than some other systems, and I think there is no chance of causing damage. If there were more wear, and especially if I didn't like the tires anyway, I might use it as an excuse to get new tires. I do think there are better tires than those Contis, but these tires aren't cheap.

My wife is pretty understanding, but if I told her I needed to get a new set of SUV tires because I got a scuff on a sidewall, I think I would get THE LOOK. :grin:
Not AWD, but still have the same question. Mileage is around 7000; now installing only one new tire on the FWD system is ok with that mileage?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I don't think anyone mentioned it, but you could try to contact the tire manufacturer and ask them to help. I did that once (with Goodyear) after pretty much the same thing happened, and they offered to pay 50% of the replacement cost through a Goodyear store. My gash, though, seemed quite a bit deeper than yours, so there was no question about replacement. Goodyear (the company) called Goodyear dealer and asked them to inspect the tire and then call them. The dealer had already seen the issue and we made an appointment. Dealer ordered the tire and when I had the appointment, they called Goodyear and they OK'd the 50% assistance, and I got my car back that same day. Goodyear's customer service was excellent, in this case at least. You may not have similar results but you have nothing to lose by trying it, other than a bit of phone time. These were OEM tires (265/50-20) so they did not have a road hazard warranty. VERY nice of Goodyear. Give it a shot.
Yeah, I did not have luck with Continental customer service last time. But definitely worth a try, thank you !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,107 Posts
You can always measure the tread depth of all your tires and compare them to each other.

If you haven't rotated your tires yet you may as well do that now since 7K miles is around the point (5K - 8K or so) when they s/b rotated.

I like the suggestion above about contacting the tire manufacturer. I'd expect to not get a decent reply but it's worth a shot.

I probably wouldn't take it to a tire shop for the inspection - take it to the dealer to start with but make sure a mechanic checks it - not just a 'service advisor' since they typically don't really know much about car mechanics. You can always get a second opinion at a tire shop but again, make sure you get their lead person to do the inspection because most people at tire shops are salespeople or 'tire busters' - the guys with minimal training who simply do the process of replacing tires, which isn't a complex thing to learn.

My Continentals, which I just replaced a few days ago, lasted around 43K miles. Assuming they started out with 8/32 or 9/32 of an inch to start with and hit around 2/32 when I replaced them that'd be roughly 6/32 wear in 43K miles which would equate to somewhere around 1/32 per 7K miles. I don't think your vehicle will have a problem with only 1/32 difference in the tires.

What 'will' make a difference and be potentially problematic would be going with a different tire brand/model. If you decide to replace it try to get the exact same tire brand/model. Some people will say that otherwise you should get 2 tires (of a different brand/model) and put them on the same axle but that presents a problem for tire rotation - you basically wouldn't be able to rotate the tires and not rotating tires will result in a much shorter life of the tires - especially in a FWD vs AWD vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
You can always measure the tread depth of all your tires and compare them to each other.

If you haven't rotated your tires yet you may as well do that now since 7K miles is around the point (5K - 8K or so) when they s/b rotated.

I like the suggestion above about contacting the tire manufacturer. I'd expect to not get a decent reply but it's worth a shot.

I probably wouldn't take it to a tire shop for the inspection - take it to the dealer to start with but make sure a mechanic checks it - not just a 'service advisor' since they typically don't really know much about car mechanics. You can always get a second opinion at a tire shop but again, make sure you get their lead person to do the inspection because most people at tire shops are salespeople or 'tire busters' - the guys with minimal training who simply do the process of replacing tires, which isn't a complex thing to learn.

My Continentals, which I just replaced a few days ago, lasted around 43K miles. Assuming they started out with 8/32 or 9/32 of an inch to start with and hit around 2/32 when I replaced them that'd be roughly 6/32 wear in 43K miles which would equate to somewhere around 1/32 per 7K miles. I don't think your vehicle will have a problem with only 1/32 difference in the tires.

What 'will' make a difference and be potentially problematic would be going with a different tire brand/model. If you decide to replace it try to get the exact same tire brand/model. Some people will say that otherwise you should get 2 tires (of a different brand/model) and put them on the same axle but that presents a problem for tire rotation - you basically wouldn't be able to rotate the tires and not rotating tires will result in a much shorter life of the tires - especially in a FWD vs AWD vehicle.

Thank you for the analysis on the possible tread difference. Yeah, will be planning for same tire brand/model.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top