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Discussion Starter #1
Recently had the timing belt replaced on my 09 MDX at a 120k or so. Have easily put a couple of thousand miles in it since the replacement. Yesterday went out to the car, completely dead. Charged the battery, car started, a few minutes later smoke coming from the engine compartment. Had it towed to the same shop that did the timing belt. Diagnosis, AC Compressor shot, almost on fire so hot. Quote $1500 fix.

Could the timing belt replacement be related to the compressor burning up?

Thanks
Lance
 

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The A/C compressor doesn't have to be removed during a timing belt replacement. The serpentine belt is removed, but that's about it.

It's a long shot, but I would have double-checked the routing of the serpentine belt before taking it back to the shop. Now that the original shop has had their hands on it, however, i'm sure the belt has been removed, again.

Could it be related? Maybe.
Is it likely? Probably not.
 

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I would check the a/c relay. If the relay is stuck it can discharge the battery. In addition the a/c pressure may spike with the relay stuck while the engine and a/c are running which would cause the a/c compressor relief valve to open and lose refrigerant (smoke you saw). There is a service bulletin for this issue. This may or may not be your issue but it's worth investigating if it is a relay and simple evac and recharge.
 

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It's hard to trust mechanics.
Isn't it coincidental that a maintenance repair is made and a week or two later the car is back in the shop?

When I take my car in for repairs, I tell the shop that this weekend, I'm taking the wife and kids out of town, to Florida or somewhere that is 700ish miles away, and I want to get this particular repair done, so we don't breakdown.

Whether they're honest or dishonest, I hope that they won't leave us stranded. Besides, they know they won't be the shop making our next repair.
 

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It's hard to trust mechanics.
Isn't it coincidental that a maintenance repair is made and a week or two later the car is back in the shop?

When I take my car in for repairs, I tell the shop that this weekend, I'm taking the wife and kids out of town, to Florida or somewhere that is 700ish miles away, and I want to get this particular repair done, so we don't breakdown.

Whether they're honest or dishonest, I hope that they won't leave us stranded. Besides, they know they won't be the shop making our next repair.
thats really not a bad thing to do. shop guys can get complacent thinking if something goes wrong at worst they have to foot the bill for a tow (which is cheap for them because they pay for so many). telling them youre taking the car out of state will at least put it in their head that a breakdown would be a big deal this time. i remember working in dads shop, there were times he said "you might as well get that extra part... do it right, theyll pay for it because theyre going on vacation"
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input. Compressor replaced ($1500) and the saga continues. Coolant leak last night and was stranded in the middle of nowhere. $250 tow and back to the shop. Now $600 for a new radiator. The shop gets good reviews, but boy do I feel like it is one thing after another. Car has 115k, second owner, I have had for 5 years and it has really been an awesome low cost maintenance vehicle up to now.
 

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With the 2019 models around the corner, your MDX is basically ten years old. Your problems are not uncommon for a vehicle of that age. Having been an Acura and Honda tech for many years (now retired), I noticed the the ten year mark was often the beginning of more expensive repairs. Even high quality vehicles don't last forever.
 

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With the 2019 models around the corner, your MDX is basically ten years old. Your problems are not uncommon for a vehicle of that age. Having been an Acura and Honda tech for many years (now retired), I noticed the the ten year mark was often the beginning of more expensive repairs. Even high quality vehicles don't last forever.
My Toyota is now approaching its 17th birthday (actually purchase date) and it is still going super strong. No major problem ever. The Toyota's in the nineties are the most reliable car ever built. Nowadays, you have to look to Toyota trucks (4Runner, Sequoia etc.) to get that kind of reliability. Except some stick shift cars, Honda's and Acura's cannot match this kind of reliability.
 

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My Toyota is now approaching its 17th birthday (actually purchase date) and it is still going super strong. No major problem ever. The Toyota's in the nineties are the most reliable car ever built. Nowadays, you have to look to Toyota trucks (4Runner, Sequoia etc.) to get that kind of reliability. Except some stick shift cars, Honda's and Acura's cannot match this kind of reliability.
Honda's from the 90's were equally reliable. And a heck of a lot less boring, imo. (still pretty boring, sure... But not Toyota Camry boring).

The newer Toyota trucks disappointment me -- and I used to own a Tacoma and a Tundra. Toyota is riding on the coattails of their reputation and they're getting complacent. It bothers me that they charge over $40k for a Tacoma but still give you disk brakes and won't fully-box the frame.
 

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Honda's from the 90's were equally reliable. And a heck of a lot less boring, imo. (still pretty boring, sure... But not Toyota Camry boring).

The newer Toyota trucks disappointment me -- and I used to own a Tacoma and a Tundra. Toyota is riding on the coattails of their reputation and they're getting complacent. It bothers me that they charge over $40k for a Tacoma but still give you disk brakes and won't fully-box the frame.
That is why I did not mention Tacoma. 4Runner is the SUV to choose if you don't have money. If you do, Lexus GX.

Toyota is not boring, it is just friendly. Working with those interference engines gives people heartaches. But you can play with Toyota's engines whichever way you want to and there is no risk whatsoever. Once a guy replaces both timing belt, his view would totally change.
 

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That is why I did not mention Tacoma. 4Runner is the SUV to choose if you don't have money. If you do, Lexus GX.
I wanted a 4Runner so bad... Until I tried to test drive one. A moon roof is a required feature for me, and the moonroof-equipped 4Runner has NO headroom. I'm 6'1" and I couldn't fit in the vehicle. I tried adjusting the seat and it doesn't move down, at all. The sales person even acknowledged that it's a common complaint and he's lost other deals, as a result.

Toyota is not boring, it is just friendly. Working with those interference engines gives people heartaches. But you can play with Toyota's engines whichever way you want to and there is no risk whatsoever. Once a guy replaces both timing belt, his view would totally change.
Most modern Toyota engines are interference. I believe all the engines with VVT-i are interference designs. The 1GR-FE (4.0L V6) in the 4Runner is certainly an interference design.
 
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