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Discussion Starter #1
Getting ready to tackle this! MDX just broke 100k miles, but is now 11 years old. Thoughts on this list... anything overkill or anything I'm missing. Any help with part numbers would also be much preferred... figure I can get some of these in a kit at a place like Rock Auto.

Timing Belt 14400-RCA-A01
Timing Belt Hydraulic Tensioner 14520-RCA-A01
Idler Bearing 14550-RCA-A01
Adjuster/Tensioner Bearing 14510-RCA-A01
Camshaft Seals 91213-RP6-A01

Water Pump + Water Pump Gasket 19200-R70-A11
Radiator Drain and Fill, Honda Type 2
Water Hose Upper 19501-RYE-A10
Water Hose Lower 19502-RYE-A10

Serpentine Drive Belt 38920-RCA-A03
Drive Belt Tensioner 31170-RCA-A04
 

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2045 people have purchased this kit (has 96% of parts you need already from actual suppliers for Acura!

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Genuine-Aisin-OEM-Timing-Belt-Water-Pump-Kit-Honda-Acura-V6-Factory-Parts/171540570047?fits=Year:2010|Model:MDX&hash=item27f09d5fbf:g:XDUAAMXQlgtS2wl2&vxp=mtr

-In addition you you will need a water pump thermostat. (Stant brand )
-perhaps the right side motor mount.
-Upper and lower hoses. (Dayco or Gates)
-6 Ngk spark plugs not from Ebay or Amazon as too many fakes! (NGK)
-6 coil packs again avoid Ebay and Amazon ( have Used Standard brand with great results)
-2 jugs Honda type 2
 

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+1 on Aisin TB kit only and genuine NGK plugs. Too many reports of bad plugs right out of the box from fakes or other brands and premature failure of TB components on off brands. A seized water pump or tensioner/idler pulley and the belt breaks and you have a major engine repair on your hands. Not the place to save $50.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
2045 people have purchased this kit (has 96% of parts you need already from actual suppliers for Acura!

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Genuine-Aisin-OEM-Timing-Belt-Water-Pump-Kit-Honda-Acura-V6-Factory-Parts/171540570047?fits=Year:2010|Model:MDX&hash=item27f09d5fbf:g:XDUAAMXQlgtS2wl2&vxp=mtr

-In addition you you will need a water pump thermostat. (Stant brand )
-perhaps the right side motor mount.
-Upper and lower hoses. (Dayco or Gates)
-6 Ngk spark plugs not from Ebay or Amazon as too many fakes! (NGK)
-6 coil packs again avoid Ebay and Amazon ( have Used Standard brand with great results)
-2 jugs Honda type 2
Thanks for the list, that looks like a pretty great deal. I'm definitely looking for high quality parts.

-Looks like you're recommending to do the thermostat while I am in there? Probably a good idea for a $30-$40 part?
-I already am current on spark plugs (NGK). I replaced them about 20k miles ago. I think I'll leave alone for now then next time I change then I'll do the coil packs as well.
-I'm clueless on motor mount accessibility or difficulty to do that work... and cost, but open to opinions on it. I'm sure they're trashed by 100k miles and 11 years as original parts?
 

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Before you purchase you parts, have you found an installer that is willing to let you bring the parts to him?

A favorite 2nd generation MDX "e-bay" timing belt kit, which does not come with the serpentine belt 38920-rca-a03 nor the cam shaft seals, is the Aisin TKH002, for around $185.

The stant thermostat, from Wilsoncc's list should be added, to your list.

Notes:

Cam Shaft Seals: If it's the 1st timing belt service and the mechanic says that they are not leaking don't replace them.
Drive Belt Tensioner: If it's not squealing, don't replace it, as they will probably last another 10 years. If you decide to buy it, don't buy it on e-bay.

No need to replace the coil packs, at 100,000 miles
No need to replace the motor mount, at 11 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Before you purchase you parts, have you found an installer that is willing to let you bring the parts to him?

A favorite 2nd generation MDX "e-bay" timing belt kit, which does not come with the serpentine belt 38920-rca-a03 nor the cam shaft seals, is the Aisin TKH002, for around $185.

The stant thermostat, from Wilsoncc's list should be added, to your list.

Notes:

Cam Shaft Seals: If it's the 1st timing belt service and the mechanic says that they are not leaking don't replace them.
Drive Belt Tensioner: If it's not squealing, don't replace it, as they will probably last another 10 years. If you decide to buy it, don't buy it on e-bay.

No need to replace the coil packs, at 100,000 miles
No need to replace the motor mount, at 11 years.
Thanks for the input! I'm planning to DIY all of this work. While I've never done this timing belt before, I've done enough related jobs on this MDX and other cars that I think I can tackle it. A friend of mine has also done this job on 2 MDXs and offered to help when I get through the covers and to the belt itself.

I agree that I probably shouldn't waste the time with the drive belt tensioner if it is fine as is. Will definitely get the t-stat added.
 

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The Asin Kit parts are the same parts used in Our MDX which is why they are so popular but you can pay 3x the price at the dealer for the perceived "higher quality" and the stamped part number which does not seem to improve the reliability of the part , pr at least so i have found. if you doubt it pull a bearing ,belt ,tensioner or seal and see manufacturer. You can polish the water pump up a bit if you like the original finish?The Aisin TKH002 $185.00 kit is the better deal which is all i purchased as I did not want or need the cam seals. (It is sitting on my bench as I speak)


This socket is a "Great Investmen" for the balancer bolt removal which is the hardest part of the job if you do not have a high enough cfm compressor. .! https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-77080-Harmonic-Balancer-Socket/dp/B00RGNCV1U
 

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Now that you're going to do the project yourself...you'll need a 5" needle nosed vis-a-grip pliers, to get the lower radiator hose clamp off and back on the radiator.

You can get Zerex Asian red or blue anti freeze (for Honda and Acura), from Advance Auto or O'reilly. It might still have a $5 mail in/internet rebate.

I haven't found out the difference between the red and blue anti freeze, just get the same color that is already in you radiator.

There is another Lisle tool that is clear (Matco makes one too) so you don't have to stand over it to see the fluid level, when burping the coolant: https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-24680-Spill-Free-Funnel/dp/B00A6AS6LY/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=lisle+spill+free+funnel+24680&qid=1552186647&s=gateway&sr=8-1
 

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2045 people have purchased this kit (has 96% of parts you need already from actual suppliers for Acura!

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Genuine-Aisin-OEM-Timing-Belt-Water-Pump-Kit-Honda-Acura-V6-Factory-Parts/171540570047?fits=Year:2010|Model:MDX&hash=item27f09d5fbf:g:XDUAAMXQlgtS2wl2&vxp=mtr

-In addition you you will need a water pump thermostat. (Stant brand )
-perhaps the right side motor mount.
-Upper and lower hoses. (Dayco or Gates)
-6 Ngk spark plugs not from Ebay or Amazon as too many fakes! (NGK)
-6 coil packs again avoid Ebay and Amazon ( have Used Standard brand with great results)
-2 jugs Honda type 2
why would u want to replace the coils & motor mounts if there still good???
thats just throwing good money at it for no reason, ya they could fail but so can everything else
 

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Getting ready to tackle this! MDX just broke 100k miles, but is now 11 years old. Thoughts on this list... anything overkill or anything I'm missing. Any help with part numbers would also be much preferred... figure I can get some of these in a kit at a place like Rock Auto.

Timing Belt 14400-RCA-A01
Timing Belt Hydraulic Tensioner 14520-RCA-A01
Idler Bearing 14550-RCA-A01
Adjuster/Tensioner Bearing 14510-RCA-A01
Camshaft Seals 91213-RP6-A01

Water Pump + Water Pump Gasket 19200-R70-A11
Radiator Drain and Fill, Honda Type 2
Water Hose Upper 19501-RYE-A10
Water Hose Lower 19502-RYE-A10

Serpentine Drive Belt 38920-RCA-A03
Drive Belt Tensioner 31170-RCA-A04

I did not replaced the camshaft seals. Those seals are not exposed to high temperatures compared to other parts. The main crankshaft front seal is more appropriated to be replaced because I have seen it failing before 200K miles in most of my cars. Also, I did not replace the upper and lower water hoses. Mine were is good shape.


I did replaced the o-ring of the radiator drain. And, with the valve adjustment, I replaced the valve cover seals, the oil seals for the spark plug wells, and intake manifold upper seal and metal gasket. Again, these seals tend to fail between 100K and 200K before the next TB replacement.
 

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You are correct that coil packs are usually changed when they go bad! However on the wifes car I change them at 100000 mi as that is more than acceptable mileage for them as they deteriorate over time and the fact that i have saved over $1000.00 in labor makes changing the coils more of a precaution for her and the kids! The old ones become spares if needed.

In terms of the motor mount many have experienced problems with it being broken or breaking and why I say" Perhaps" is if they find that it is damaged after tearing into it!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Now that you're going to do the project yourself...you'll need a 5" needle nosed vis-a-grip pliers, to get the lower radiator hose clamp off and back on the radiator.

You can get Zerex Asian red or blue anti freeze (for Honda and Acura), from Advance Auto or O'reilly. It might still have a $5 mail in/internet rebate.

I haven't found out the difference between the red and blue anti freeze, just get the same color that is already in you radiator.

There is another Lisle tool that is clear (Matco makes one too) so you don't have to stand over it to see the fluid level, when burping the coolant: https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-24680-Spill-Free-Funnel/dp/B00A6AS6LY/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=lisle+spill+free+funnel+24680&qid=1552186647&s=gateway&sr=8-1
Thanks! I actually wrote the coolant DIY on this forum and didn't discover that funnel until the 2nd time I did it. Ended up using several shop/bath towels soaked through to do it. Would never do it again without that funnel!

https://www.mdxers.org/forums/74-second-generation-mdx-2007-2013/55914-diy-guide-step-step-how-change-coolant-acura-mdx-w-pictures.html
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I was calling around this morning to a few indy shops and my local Acura dealer. Here is what the dealer had to say:

--$980 for parts and labor for the timing belt, water pump and drive belt. No other parts changed out.
--Said he has never seen a issue with the cam seals on our MDX. Did say they sometimes see front crankshaft seal leaks.
--Said they do not replace the T-stat preventively with this repair, said they are bulletproof.
--Said they do not normally include the belt tensioners or adjusters or bearings.

He of course said they would do any additional parts I asked them to replace. Parts costs and very minimal labor since they are already in there. And obviously not saying he is right about everything, but wanted to share his opinion here.
 

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That's because they stand to make more money when the tensioner, bearings and T stat fail in the vehicle or charge you unnecessarily because they are there already and takes only 4 minutes to replace the bearings and tensioner for timing belt! You really gotta love how these folks pretend they are doing you a favor, I don't know how they keep from laughing their #$%@$ off in front of the customers or on the phone! I know they cant look themselves in the mirror.These are the people you want to trust? So Sad.:(
 

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Doing the job yourself has one problem, if you don't do it correctly, or the belt for some reason is bad out of the box and breaks shortly after you install it gernading the engine, you won't have the dealer to warranty the damage! I've actually seen, and heard of brand new belts that were installed by the dealer breaking within a couple of thousand miles, or a the idler bearing locked up and the dealer had to pay to repair the engine, it's one thing for a dealer to prove the belt broke due to faulty belt and not faulty installation and get reimbursed for the engine by the belt manufacture, it's another for a private person to prove that same thing and not be blamed for faulty installation. Most dealers will give you a 90 day warranty on these repairs, most independant places won't give you any warranty on a timing belt replacement because they don't want to be out the cost of an engine! that should tell you something. You should ask your dealer what they cover and how long after the repair in case of a premature failure of the new belt or idler pulley that causes engine damage.

READ THIS: https://www.aa1car.com/library/timingbelts_903.htm

How often does a premature failure happen? not often, but if it does you will have to pay for an engine, is that a risk you're willing to accept? you could have the dealer do the belt, pulley and water pump, and you do the hoses, serpentine belt, and the plugs etc. I wouldn't do the coils at all, if they test good then leave them, they will fail one at a time anyways when that happens replace them one at a time, if you live in a dry climate those coil packs will probably last the life of the car. Coil packs usually fail due to worn out spark plugs, so keep your plugs fresh; the other way they fail is improper engine washing with a high pressure water sprayer; and if you live in a high humidity area, sort of like improper engine washing, the moisture will eventually ruin the coils; and a final way for coil destruction is an oil leak onto the plugs and coils. There is another way coils fail but most people wouldn't do this anyways, and that is pulling the coil off the plug while the engine is running trying to figure out which cylinder has a misfire, the best way to do such a test is to disconnect the low voltage connector and leave the coil in place. The serpentine belt you should be able to eyeball it and see if it's still good, but if it's never been changed then perhaps its probably time.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Doing the job yourself has one problem, if you don't do it correctly, or the belt for some reason is bad out of the box and breaks shortly after you install it gernading the engine, you won't have the dealer to warranty the damage! I've actually seen, and heard of brand new belts that were installed by the dealer breaking within a couple of thousand miles, or a the idler bearing locked up and the dealer had to pay to repair the engine, it's one thing for a dealer to prove the belt broke due to faulty belt and not faulty installation and get reimbursed for the engine by the belt manufacture, it's another for a private person to prove that same thing and not be blamed for faulty installation. Most dealers will give you a 90 day warranty on these repairs, most independant places won't give you any warranty on a timing belt replacement because they don't want to be out the cost of an engine! that should tell you something. You should ask your dealer what they cover and how long after the repair in case of a premature failure of the new belt or idler pulley that causes engine damage.

READ THIS: https://www.aa1car.com/library/timingbelts_903.htm

How often does a premature failure happen? not often, but if it does you will have to pay for an engine, is that a risk you're willing to accept? you could have the dealer do the belt, pulley and water pump, and you do the hoses, serpentine belt, and the plugs etc. I wouldn't do the coils at all, if they test good then leave them, they will fail one at a time anyways when that happens replace them one at a time, if you live in a dry climate those coil packs will probably last the life of the car. Coil packs usually fail due to worn out spark plugs, so keep your plugs fresh; the other way they fail is improper engine washing with a high pressure water sprayer; and if you live in a high humidity area, sort of like improper engine washing, the moisture will eventually ruin the coils; and a final way for coil destruction is an oil leak onto the plugs and coils. There is another way coils fail but most people wouldn't do this anyways, and that is pulling the coil off the plug while the engine is running trying to figure out which cylinder has a misfire, the best way to do such a test is to disconnect the low voltage connector and leave the coil in place. The serpentine belt you should be able to eyeball it and see if it's still good, but if it's never been changed then perhaps its probably time.
Agree on all of your points. After I started assembling parts costs and my time to DIY this, I made a few calls to the dealer and a few local indy places with good reputations. I am now leaning towards paying for this work to be done.

I already did my spark plugs around 80k miles and I do live in a very dry location so agree no need to touch the coil packs.
 

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Doing the job yourself has one problem, if you don't do it correctly, or the belt for some reason is bad out of the box and breaks shortly after you install it gernading the engine, you won't have the dealer to warranty the damage! I've actually seen, and heard of brand new belts that were installed by the dealer breaking within a couple of thousand miles, or a the idler bearing locked up and the dealer had to pay to repair the engine, it's one thing for a dealer to prove the belt broke due to faulty belt and not faulty installation and get reimbursed for the engine by the belt manufacture, it's another for a private person to prove that same thing and not be blamed for faulty installation. Most dealers will give you a 90 day warranty on these repairs, most independant places won't give you any warranty on a timing belt replacement because they don't want to be out the cost of an engine! that should tell you something. You should ask your dealer what they cover and how long after the repair in case of a premature failure of the new belt or idler pulley that causes engine damage.

READ THIS: https://www.aa1car.com/library/timingbelts_903.htm

How often does a premature failure happen? not often, but if it does you will have to pay for an engine, is that a risk you're willing to accept? you could have the dealer do the belt, pulley and water pump, and you do the hoses, serpentine belt, and the plugs etc. I wouldn't do the coils at all, if they test good then leave them, they will fail one at a time anyways when that happens replace them one at a time, if you live in a dry climate those coil packs will probably last the life of the car. Coil packs usually fail due to worn out spark plugs, so keep your plugs fresh; the other way they fail is improper engine washing with a high pressure water sprayer; and if you live in a high humidity area, sort of like improper engine washing, the moisture will eventually ruin the coils; and a final way for coil destruction is an oil leak onto the plugs and coils. There is another way coils fail but most people wouldn't do this anyways, and that is pulling the coil off the plug while the engine is running trying to figure out which cylinder has a misfire, the best way to do such a test is to disconnect the low voltage connector and leave the coil in place. The serpentine belt you should be able to eyeball it and see if it's still good, but if it's never been changed then perhaps its probably time.
Paying someone to do this job simply to get a warranty against premature failure of a high quality part is not a wise investment, imo. You can put yourself right in the poor house buying insurance and extended warranties. Now, if you are not mechanically inclined, don’t have tools or space and insist on buying cheap aftermarket parts, I would say pay someone to do it. Of course, the odds of getting someone to do the job right is a real crapshoot too.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Paying someone to do this job simply to get a warranty against premature failure of a high quality part is not a wise investment, imo. You can put yourself right in the poor house buying insurance and extended warranties. Now, if you are not mechanically inclined, don’t have tools or space and insist on buying cheap aftermarket parts, I would say pay someone to do it. Of course, the odds of getting someone to do the job right is a real crapshoot too.
All good points. I would say that I much prefer to DIY because I'll know, without a doubt, that I did the job right and with the level and care and precision only I would deliver because it is my car. Most of the time, when mechanics ham up jobs, its the simple stuff that they stick their least experienced folks on.

My experience is that most good indy shops only employ a handful of mechanics... and they're all solid. Unlike dealerships, smaller indy shops cannot afford the financial burden of a botched job like a timing belt, rod bearings and dealing with insurance, etc.... They also can't afford all the time messing around with a return customer with problems from a botched job on a major service... therefore they usually put their best person on those jobs to get them done fast and with high quality.

I've only had two major services done in the past few years, but both times they stuck their best person on the job.

FWIW, I'm still debating DIY for this, but for me it is more about the time to do the job and how many busted knuckles I'll have when I'm done vs. the benefit of the warranty from a shop. :)
 
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