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I guess then American manufactures dont know how to program. But yeah, it is way better than CVT
[/QUO
Actually jeep did okay with it the problem was lifetime fluid which really does need to be serviced with proper service these transactions performed fine for a long time in 2019 although not perfect Acura did get them to shift much better a simple 3/12 quart drain and fill every 30k
 

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Very interesting thought. Who else using ZF trans besides those mentioned above? I might search for some feedback from Chrysler’s users to see how they reacted to the ZF. Any ZF9 used in European brands that don’t have similar issue Acura users are having.
Most of the problems chrysler having is after 70k miles while Zf doesn’t give specific service intervals I’ve heard every 30 k is the trick .My 2019 Acura mdx advance shifts just fine
 

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Most of the problems chrysler having is after 70k miles while Zf doesn’t give specific service intervals I’ve heard every 30 k is the trick .My 2019 Acura mdx advance shifts just fine
Jaguar Range Rover Ram trucks
 

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Very interesting thought. Who else using ZF trans besides those mentioned above? I might search for some feedback from Chrysler’s users to see how they reacted to the ZF. Any ZF9 used in European brands that don’t have similar issue Acura users are having.
ZF8 has been successful in BMWs, so Acura must have switched to it. Main difference being ZF9 is the first of it's series developed for front wheel drives.
 

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Very interesting thought. Who else using ZF trans besides those mentioned above? I might search for some feedback from Chrysler’s users to see how they reacted to the ZF. Any ZF9 used in European brands that don’t have similar issue Acura users are having.
Here is the following list of brands that uses ZF 9spd:
  • Acura/Honda
  • Nissan
  • JLR
  • Stellantis (formerly as FCA)
  • Vauxhaull/Opel
I found an article that there was a recall for Land Rovers for this same transmission.
 
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ZF8 has been successful in BMWs, so Acura must have switched to it. Main difference being ZF9 is the first of it's series developed for front wheel drives.
Acura switched to it because they did not have anything made in house at the moment and it is cheap (6 speed was ancient). ZF9 transmission is design for econoboxes not for performance vehicles. Do not compare it to 8 speed, it is much more superior to 9speed.
 

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I just also test drove a 22 MDX Tech an hour ago. Finally they allow for customization. Salesperson allowed me to have VTEC kick in, shifts are worlds smoother than the ZF 9spd. This is a true X5 and Rx 350 competitor minus the horrible infotainment interface. Camera is in HD compared to the 3rd gens SD camera.



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Test drove this car. Absolutely beautiful. It felt slower than my 2016 MDX. Does Acura have a govenor on this to protect the transmission? Felt underwhelming. What I don't like is the flush rear end. The mildest of parking bumps from a careless driver will damage the metal rear hatch door. Also, I don't like the fact that Acura still has a timing belt that has to be changed every 7 years. Some Honda/Acura models do have timing chains. . Lastly, why do Honda Pilots have 3rd row air conditioning vents but the MDX still doesn't? The Lexus RX350 has quad zone climate control. Everything else about this vehicle is quite impressive though.
As noted by another post, the new MDX (G4) is heavier and it uses the same 290hp engine, therefore marginally slower. I wasn’t happy about that but Acura figured most won’t care and they’re probably right. For people like me who DO care, the upcoming 355hp turbo V6 to come is the ticket (though I’d never buy a first year Acura). The timing BELT is CHEAPER to make and is MUCH QUIETER than a timing chain. Think of all the complaints from clueless owners bemoaning how the new engine was louder than the last one if it were equipped w/timing chain instead of a belt. As an added plus for Acura, a belt throws its dealers a massive bone, a lifetime annuity of sorts by forcing hundreds of thousands of new owners to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to dealers to change the timing belt at 100K that dealers would miss out on with a lifetime-lasting timing chain. Ergo, most customers are shortsightedly happy (quieter, slightly cheaper engine) while Acura satiates the dealers with a lucrative stream of future business.
 

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As noted by another post, the new MDX (G4) is heavier and it uses the same 290hp engine, therefore marginally slower. I wasn’t happy about that but Acura figured most won’t care and they’re probably right. For people like me who DO care, the upcoming 355hp turbo V6 to come is the ticket (though I’d never buy a first year Acura). The timing BELT is CHEAPER to make and is MUCH QUIETER than a timing chain. Think of all the complaints from clueless owners bemoaning how the new engine was louder than the last one if it were equipped w/timing chain instead of a belt. As an added plus for Acura, a belt throws its dealers a massive bone, a lifetime annuity of sorts by forcing hundreds of thousands of new owners to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to dealers to change the timing belt at 100K that dealers would miss out on with a lifetime-lasting timing chain. Ergo, most customers are shortsightedly happy (quieter, slightly cheaper engine) while Acura satiates the dealers with a lucrative stream of future business.
But timing chains also get replaced at or around the same intervals
 

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If it ain't broke, don't change; that's what the thing has been for the J series since its inception back in the 90s, with the timing belt. And I have to agree too, with the whole 3rd row doesn't get A/C vents in the MDX. I guess Honda made the MDX's 3rd row to be not used regularly or something.



K series are timing chains. All F series and older 4 cylinders are timing belts.
"If it ain't broke, don't change?"
aren't these interference engines (J)?
 

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"If it ain't broke, don't change?"
aren't these interference engines (J)?
Yes. Unless Honda decides to put a timing chain and remove the belt.

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But timing chains also get replaced at or around the same intervals
While my 14 MDX has a timing belt that is about to require replacement (I just passed 99K miles yesterday and they’re due at 105K), I also have an Infiniti G37 S coupe w/manual transmission. It and all the Infiniti cars I’ve had before were timing chain equipped (not belt), and each one was serviced at Infiniti dealers for most of their lives. On Infiniti V6 engines such as mine, the cam chain is considered a “lifetime part” which is only replaced if it were exhibiting signs of wearing out such as looseness, noises from the chain, etc. I once asked the Svc mgr and he said there’s no fixed interval to change the chain but on older cars they always look at it (listen and otherwise diagnose an impending problem). My previous Infiniti cars (FX35 and G20) went over 165K miles and 187K miles respectively before they were each involved in accidents which totaled them but the timing chains never needed service (both were regularly serviced at Infiniti dealers) and were never replaced.

My statement that belts were cheaper than chains oversimplified things, so I’ll add that timing chains also have chain adjustment guides/tensioners which keep the chains on track (toothed cogs instead of a belt’s pulleys) and add pressure against the chains to keep them from slipping. All that extra hardware is much more costly to build up front than cheaper (but relatively long lasting) belt and pulleys. Both are “different ways to skin a cat”. One costs more on the front end, the other more on the back end, so when buying new that’s a factor one might consider. If you keep your cars a long time (as I obviously do) then a timing chain means (all else being equal) that engine is more durable and cheaper to maintain than a timing belt-equipped engine. Timing belts break and do stretch far more frequently than timing chains - hence the replacement interval for belts. I know that I won’t be a happy camper come this summer when I have to shell out big bucks for the timing belt service (which admittedly includes much more than just changing the belt). For me the difference between Acura’s use of a belt vs some competitors’ use of chains is probably moot as I am leaning toward an electric vehicle when my MDX is ostensibly “done”; hopefully not for another 5+ years with scheduled service. As for my G37, I drive it less than 5K miles per year so it’ll easily last into the next decade, no timing chain replacement required.
 

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But timing chains also get replaced at or around the same intervals
Just curious - on which vehicles are you referring to where a timing chain must be replaced at around a 100K interval, if specified to be replaced at an interval at all? I've not seen a requirement that timing chains get replaced at a particular mileage interval like timing belts must although I can see that on an interference engine they might have a spec to replace one at an interval because of either wear or slop and I haven't exactly checked the maintenance intervals for every make of car.

I've only had one timing chain issue and the timing chain itself didn't break but the gear on the camshaft broke a tooth or two causing the chain to slip about 180 - which was a hassle to determine it actually was the timing off since it went 180. This was on an old USA V8 that's non interference so other than it not starting it didn't do any damage. If it had been an interference engine damage may have ensued. I replaced the parts myself in the carport of an apartment complex.
 

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Just curious - on which vehicles are you referring to where a timing chain must be replaced at around a 100K interval, if specified to be replaced at an interval at all? I've not seen a requirement that timing chains get replaced at a particular mileage interval like timing belts must although I can see that on an interference engine they might have a spec to replace one at an interval because of either wear or slop and I haven't exactly checked the maintenance intervals for every make of car.

I've only had one timing chain issue and the timing chain itself didn't break but the gear on the camshaft broke a tooth or two causing the chain to slip about 180 - which was a hassle to determine it actually was the timing off since it went 180. This was on an old USA V8 that's non interference so other than it not starting it didn't do any damage. If it had been an interference engine damage may have ensued. I replaced the parts myself in the carport of an apartment complex.
I just quickly googled timing chain replacement intervals came up 100k in general
 

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I just quickly googled timing chain replacement intervals came up 100k in general
Ummm, you mean timing belts? My previous car was timing chain and I didn't changed the chain at 105k miles. You don't change the chain till like 200k to 300k miles or maybe more.

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Ummm, you mean timing belts? My previous car was timing chain and I didn't changed the chain at 105k miles. You don't change the chain till like 200k to 300k miles or maybe more.

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Google it I’ve never replaced it timing chain on a69 caddy or 73 electra or a 70 town car but from what I see it doesn’t say slac adjustment it says replace besides how many cars are using chains today
 

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As noted by another post, the new MDX (G4) is heavier and it uses the same 290hp engine, therefore marginally slower. I wasn’t happy about that but Acura figured most won’t care and they’re probably right. For people like me who DO care, the upcoming 355hp turbo V6 to come is the ticket (though I’d never buy a first year Acura). The timing BELT is CHEAPER to make and is MUCH QUIETER than a timing chain. Think of all the complaints from clueless owners bemoaning how the new engine was louder than the last one if it were equipped w/timing chain instead of a belt. As an added plus for Acura, a belt throws its dealers a massive bone, a lifetime annuity of sorts by forcing hundreds of thousands of new owners to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to dealers to change the timing belt at 100K that dealers would miss out on with a lifetime-lasting timing chain. Ergo, most customers are shortsightedly happy (quieter, slightly cheaper engine) while Acura satiates the dealers with a lucrative stream of future business.
I have been curious as to why my 2001 MDX had a timing belt, but our 2003 Honda Element had a timing chain. The noise issue is a logical reason.
By the way, for those mentioning timing chain change at 100k, I still have a pdf of our 03 Element's manual and there is no mention of any maintenance for the timing chain, and maintenance is shown for up to 160k mi in the manual.
 

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But timing chains also get replaced at or around the same intervals
not. All vehicles I've owned with timing chains have no change interval. One has 290K miles on it, another has 230K miles, three more that I put 175-200K miles on, There were a VERY few engines made with marginal timing chains that would skip a tooth due to stretch and no auto adjuster in the 200K mile range.
 

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Just curious - on which vehicles are you referring to where a timing chain must be replaced at around a 100K interval, if specified to be replaced at an interval at all? I've not seen a requirement that timing chains get replaced at a particular mileage interval like timing belts must although I can see that on an interference engine they might have a spec to replace one at an interval because of either wear or slop and I haven't exactly checked the maintenance intervals for every make of car.

I've only had one timing chain issue and the timing chain itself didn't break but the gear on the camshaft broke a tooth or two causing the chain to slip about 180 - which was a hassle to determine it actually was the timing off since it went 180. This was on an old USA V8 that's non interference so other than it not starting it didn't do any damage. If it had been an interference engine damage may have ensued. I replaced the parts myself in the carport of an apartment complex.
Timing belts don't stretch, timing chains do.

That being said, I am always wondering the longevity of other components in the chain, like tensioners or idler pulley etc. Do they last a lifetime? Also water pump. Do they move water pump to drive belt when using chains? Thanks

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