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Discussion Starter #1
Never got around to posting this. I originally had the Fumoto valve, but when that engine blew and I had it replaced, the shop sent the old engine back to the wreckers with the Fumoto (and new sparks plugs, PCV valve, and who knows what else I forgot). So I ended up getting a Stahlbus and wow, is it great (the oil stain is from a traditional drain just before installation - it has never leaked).

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I always found the Fumoto's lever to be finicky, and at the same time I was paranoid about something hitting it and opening it, or clogging the tube. The Stahlbus has a cap that keeps the valve protected. It drains with a quarter-turn quick connector attached to a silicone hose. Best part is that hose end can be attached to the quick connector like a loop to keep it clean for storage.
 

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This is so much work that the good old drain plug seems quicker.

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I don't at all understand why people on every forum so passionately defend these drain valves...it's a $40 solution in search of a problem. Removing the drain plug ranks at the bottom of DIY oil change hassles; recycling the used oil, dealing with the filter (usually messy), jacking and supporting the car, rolling around on the ground, refilling without making a mess, getting the new oil level right, deciding which beer to consume, which music to listen to...then at the bottom of the list is the 14 seconds it take to remove a good old reliable drain plug.
 
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I don't at all understand why anyone doesn't understand the amount of time this saves from a conventional oil change. I can drain straight into a jug and I'm done. No buying crush washers, no jacking up the car, no searching for tools or setting torque wrench or risking stripping the drain bolt threads, no cleaning up an oil spill, no need for or cleaning an oil pan. My time is more valuable than the $45 I spent on this valve and if I didn't save so much time, I wouldn't have mentioned it. But hey, if you're happy with the way you do it, by all means, keep at it.
 

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I don't at all understand why anyone doesn't understand the amount of time this saves from a conventional oil change. I can drain straight into a jug and I'm done. No buying crush washers, no jacking up the car, no searching for tools or setting torque wrench or risking stripping the drain bolt threads, no cleaning up an oil spill, no need for or cleaning an oil pan. My time is more valuable than the $45 I spent on this valve and if I didn't save so much time, I wouldn't have mentioned it. But hey, if you're happy with the way you do it, by all means, keep at it.
-I am curious on how you rig a jug into an un-lifted MDX? I have a low profile oil pan and I think I can manage if I seriously wasnt in the mood on driving the MDX up the ramps but seems more like a hassle than a time saving procedure? Would like to see how you do that.

-Done about +500 oil changes in my life, I have never ever used a Torque Wrench to set up the torque in the drain pan... Never stripped or damaged a Honda drain bolt thread either, In my own cars I rarely replace the crush washers.. The crush washer is actually made to avoid stripping the threads not to seal them, So if you torque the drain bolt properly you can re-use the crush washer and never have a leak.. I think the one in the MDX has at the very least 4 oil changes in it with no leaks.

-How do you remove the oil filter without making a mess? Since is the filthiest part of the oil change I am again curious on how do you manage to keep it clean enough to not even clean the threads or base of the oil filter?

-Doing an oil change for me is a 15 min job tops... I am sure this type of drain plugs can save me 1 full minute on the job, 60 seconds of my life aint worth +40dlls at least for me but to each its own I guess.

I would never recommend these types of drain plugs to my customers, Since it add an unnecessary point of failure that could potentially destroy your engine.
 

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I bought my 2007 MDX with a stripped out/silicone packed oil plug.
I tapped it (used oil resistant gasket maker) and installed a valve.
I'm happy.
Otherwise, I try to use a torque wrench on aluminum parts and pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
-I am curious on how you rig a jug into an un-lifted MDX? I have a low profile oil pan and I think I can manage if I seriously wasnt in the mood on driving the MDX up the ramps but seems more like a hassle than a time saving procedure? Would like to see how you do that.
That's because you're still thinking traditionally. Put the jug under on its side, poke a small hole in the neck, and put the tube in. Then a piece of tape to cover the hole when you're done, which really only prevents splashing out because those jugs hold more than the 5 L that comes in it, and you don't get 5 L from the drain plug anyway.

-Done about +500 oil changes in my life, I have never ever used a Torque Wrench to set up the torque in the drain pan... Never stripped or damaged a Honda drain bolt thread either, In my own cars I rarely replace the crush washers.. The crush washer is actually made to avoid stripping the threads not to seal them, So if you torque the drain bolt properly you can re-use the crush washer and never have a leak.. I think the one in the MDX has at the very least 4 oil changes in it with no leaks.
I haven't had a traditional drain plug on my MDX for so long I can't comment on it specifically, but generally, crush washers deform to create an even seal between the oil pan and the bolt, not the threads themselves. No crush washer in the world is going to prevent stripping if you overtighten. Also, I don't believe the MDX is a true crush washer like the Subarus (that has an air gap between the two sides), it's just an aluminum washer. A lot of people can tighten sufficiently without stripping, but some can't. I personally prefer to avoid taking the risk.

-How do you remove the oil filter without making a mess? Since is the filthiest part of the oil change I am again curious on how do you manage to keep it clean enough to not even clean the threads or base of the oil filter?
Cut the top off a 2L pop bottle and let it drain into that while the rest of the engine oil is draining. I don;'t sit around watching the thing - I have other jobs to do while it's draining. By the time it's done, there's just a film of oil on the threads and bottom of the filter intake that you can choose to wipe or not. You're never going to get all the oil oil out no matter how long you let it sit. And some people like to oil up the o-ring of the new filter, so just spin it onto the residual oil and you're done.

-Doing an oil change for me is a 15 min job tops... I am sure this type of drain plugs can save me 1 full minute on the job, 60 seconds of my life aint worth +40dlls at least for me but to each its own I guess.
Exactly, as I said before, if you prefer the traditional way, keep at it. I'm just mentioning my own experience, which reflects that of many others who use these (even the Fumoto). No reason to trivialize this as a solution in need of a problem.


I would never recommend these types of drain plugs to my customers, Since it add an unnecessary point of failure that could potentially destroy your engine.
This is why I prefer the Stahlbus over the Fumoto, as mentioned above. Also, I only have these installed on some of my cars and bikes, not all. It depends on the location of the drain. The MDX is a prime candidate because it's up and out of the way on the horizontal plane.
 
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