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One of the reasons I got a 2nd gen mdx instead of a 1st gen is because the transmission.

I guess lawsuits are hard to win and can be costly even if you have a really good lawyer.

Have the people file a NHTSA complaint?

I remember my dad's VW Dasher had transmission issues back in 80s. We didn't sue given it was covered under extended warranty though. You bet, we sold that car 10K miles thereafter the odometer wasn't acting funny.
 

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After reading the thread, both sides of the argument are valid in some situations, but having been around Acura since the last of the Vigors rolled out of the showroom floor, I do find it interesting how the internet has impacted the consumer in relation to vehicles. Let me elaborate a bit.

Now this post is more of a history lesson in car and consumer rather than a judgement call, so take it for what it is.......

People talk quite frequently about the rock-solidness of the older Acuras, but they had their issues too. Around the "rust belt", the second-generation Integras were herendous for rust. We used to see 4 or 5 year old Integras (warranty was 3/36 back then) with low miles come in with the exhausts completely rotted from rust, fuel and brake lines leaking and rusted requiring all new lines, and busted stabilizer links about every other oil change. Legends, it was front springs. At the time, I worked for a small Acura franchise, and we stocked about a dozen sets. People would be presented with $300-$800 bills for repairs and simple servicing, and were happy to pay them. Strange but true, I was there. Heck, I remember one '89 Integra RS 4 door that an older couple absolutely loved that had well over $4,000 in repairs and maintenance done on it by the time it was 10 years old. Had about 200K on the clock. It was light blue. I can still picture that car in my mind. The biggest repair that we subletted out was to have parts of the frame reconstructed that were rotted through, making the car so it wouldn't pass inspection. I think that was around 1997 or 98.

Each Acura dealership back in the day had a transmission guy. That particular mechanic was assigned to do trans repair, I think the reman transmission program came in around 1998 or so. He'd come up to the counter, and we'd pull up a diagram, and he'd say "order this, this, this, this, and this", the car was down for a few days, and we'd do the repair in-house, saving the customer a decent chunk of change on customer pay work.

The Acuras made back then were great cars, no doubt, just as they are today. I do think that a major part of the reason that they tend to get better press then as opposed to today is that by the time that the internet came into vogue, most of the cars that people now wax philosophical about, were well out of warranty or had six figures on the odometer.

Different life in the 21st century, different problems.
 

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After reading the thread, both sides of the argument are valid in some situations, but having been around Acura since the last of the Vigors rolled out of the showroom floor, I do find it interesting how the internet has impacted the consumer in relation to vehicles. Let me elaborate a bit.

Now this post is more of a history lesson in car and consumer rather than a judgement call, so take it for what it is.......

People talk quite frequently about the rock-solidness of the older Acuras, but they had their issues too. Around the "rust belt", the second-generation Integras were herendous for rust. We used to see 4 or 5 year old Integras (warranty was 3/36 back then) with low miles come in with the exhausts completely rotted from rust, fuel and brake lines leaking and rusted requiring all new lines, and busted stabilizer links about every other oil change. Legends, it was front springs. At the time, I worked for a small Acura franchise, and we stocked about a dozen sets. People would be presented with $300-$800 bills for repairs and simple servicing, and were happy to pay them. Strange but true, I was there. Heck, I remember one '89 Integra RS 4 door that an older couple absolutely loved that had well over $4,000 in repairs and maintenance done on it by the time it was 10 years old. Had about 200K on the clock. It was light blue. I can still picture that car in my mind. The biggest repair that we subletted out was to have parts of the frame reconstructed that were rotted through, making the car so it wouldn't pass inspection. I think that was around 1997 or 98.

Each Acura dealership back in the day had a transmission guy. That particular mechanic was assigned to do trans repair, I think the reman transmission program came in around 1998 or so. He'd come up to the counter, and we'd pull up a diagram, and he'd say "order this, this, this, this, and this", the car was down for a few days, and we'd do the repair in-house, saving the customer a decent chunk of change on customer pay work.

The Acuras made back then were great cars, no doubt, just as they are today. I do think that a major part of the reason that they tend to get better press then as opposed to today is that by the time that the internet came into vogue, most of the cars that people now wax philosophical about, were well out of warranty or had six figures on the odometer.

Different life in the 21st century, different problems.

I agree, much like anything else the information flows freely, both bad and good. But Personally I have the 1st Gen MDX and yes had the TC and Tranny replaced. I came to the judgment if heaven forbid I had to change the tranny I would fight for a new one, even if part goodwill, since the rest of it is rock solid. 4k Is still cheaper than a new 42K car.
 
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