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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a 2010 MDX Tech/Entertainment with 94,000 miles. When I test drove it, I heard a clunking noise from the right rear of the car. Having read up on this here on the forum, I had the dealer put it up on a lift, and checked things out. Sure enough...a badly leaking shock. Wasn't a deal breaker for me. Came home and ordered KYB's from Rock Auto, and a few days later, they arrived and I went to put them on. To say the old shock was shot was an understatement...I compressed it, and it never rebounded! I had no problem removing the old shock and replacing it...but when I moved over to the other side (driver's side), I could not, for the life of me, break the lower shock mount bolt loose. I tried heating it with my little propane torch, to no avail, and then sprayed it with PB Blaster and let it soak. I broke out my electric impact gun, and hit it with that...but it wouldn't budge. I had an appointment at my Acura dealer a couple of days later, so I asked the service writer if he could have the techs break it loose for me, then snug it up so I could get it home to change the shock. At first, he said no problem, and even told me that there'd be no charge. But later, he came out to the waiting area, and told me that the techs said that to remove it, they'd have to heat the bolt, which would most likely cause it to not thread back in when I went to install the new shock. Their advice was to bring in the shock that I had already purchased and they'd install it for me....to the tune of $200! I told them to just leave it alone, went over to parts and ordered a new bolt, and will have a local, independent shop remove the old bolt for me. Has anyone else had this problem? Apparently, it's an Acura/Honda problem, as I've had the same problem when I went to change the rear shocks on my daughter's 2008 Honda Civic. I've changed lots of shocks in my time...but I've never had as much trouble with shocks as I've had with these two vehicles!
 

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pretty much all cars have this problem, my wife's infiniti had same problem....
 

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Same issue here. I ended up cutting the bolt. Sawzall and a lift should take care of it.
 

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This is a very common item with Honda/Acura Cars as in the past I have worked on numerous accords,civic/crx's, Integras,etc and since I live in NYC our snow/salt makes things worse.

Sometimes you can get away with PB Blaster and some heat but more often than not I would snap the bolts off and cut the other end off and replace the complete bushing if it was rusted bad.
 

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Has anyone else had this problem? Apparently, it's an Acura/Honda problem, as I've had the same problem when I went to change the rear shocks on my daughter's 2008 Honda Civic.

Yes, I've owned a dozen Honda/Acura vehicles and they all exhibit this issue, especially if driven in snow states.

As for PM, if you can break free any of the shock mount bolts, I recommend applying a little anti-seize compound and you should be set. If you use any other lube, it will eventually deteriorate and you will have to do it again. With anti-seize, it's usually set it and forget it until you have to touch it the next time.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I second the anti-seize compound. On the passenger side bolt, which came out easily, I wire brushed the bolt to remove as much rust/crap as I could, then coated it with anti-seize before reinstalling it. For those of you who cut the bolt...how did you get the remainder of it out of the threaded collar on the front side of the control arm?
 

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I second the anti-seize compound. On the passenger side bolt, which came out easily, I wire brushed the bolt to remove as much rust/crap as I could, then coated it with anti-seize before reinstalling it. For those of you who cut the bolt...how did you get the remainder of it out of the threaded collar on the front side of the control arm?
Alpine is correct..I always apply anti-seize to the entire bolt shaft and thread area completely whenever removing anything on all my cars, regardless of age. This is a good preventative measure that can save you a lot of headaches and busted knuckles in the long rung.

To answer the OP's question about the remainder of the bolt in the control arm sometimes I have been lucky enough where the part that is stuck in the threads will already be loose and can come out using a chisel but sometimes I needed to drill out the remaining part and tap the threads afterwards.
 
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