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Discussion Starter #1
I replaced RF (passenger) CV axle on my MDX today because of a badly leaking inner boot. I thought I would just replace the boot. However, when I removed the boot, the spider rollers and spider arms were badly worn, so I replaced the axle w/ rebuilt shaft from O'Riellys. I hope its a good one.

I haven't seen a detailed post of this procedure, so I'll recount my experience.

I first reviewed the factory procedure and thought this would be a "piece of cake", however I've been stung before w/ factory procedure being too brief and lacking important details. My experience suggests the shop manual leaves out some essential steps.

Next I ran the car up on ramps to see how difficult it would be to drive the CV axle housing off the splined shaft from the transmission. At first glance it looked difficult. There appeared to be no way to get a bar on the back side of the CV housing to apply some jar w/ a hammer to the bar end. However, I have several pry bars and one had a slight offset end which allowed the bar to go over exhaust pipes and contact back side of the axle.

I've removed a few cv axles and thought disconnecting knuckle would be similar to other Acura and Hondas I've worked on. However it didn't work out that way.

1) Loosen axle nut w/ wheel firmly on the ground. No problems here w/ a good air impact. I suspect it would be more challenging w/ a breaker bar and cheater pipe, but doable.

2) Raise vehicle on jack stands using floor jack on front center lift point. I applied support directly from jack stand V-support to the support tabs. This worked well. However, I kept the floor jack supporting some load on the front-center support as a safety. You have to get well under the car to do some of the work, so security of support is a must.

3) Disconnect anti-sway bar link to strut. (About only thing in the manual that worked OK)

4) Disconnect lower ball joint. I first tried rotating the knuckle to pull the axle out to the front. No possible way will this work IMO, but that is only way to remove shaft w/ knuckle completely assembled.

I have a ball joint lifter which has always worked for me, but it was too small for the MDX lower BJ. So I decided to sacrifice the boot and use a wedge fork to break the lower BJ. This worked OK, but damaged boot as anticipated.

5) I decided to also release the tie-rod BJ to allow knuckle to come outward. This was easy w/ the BJ Lifter tool.

6) I released the ABS wheel speed sensor and removed brake line support on strut. I still could not pull the knuckle off the lower BJ. The lower arm and strut are held together by spring force (lower arm wants to go up) which was too much for me to separate BJ from knuckle manually.

7) I removed the strut-knuckle bolts, and finally was able to pull knuckle away from axle shaft end and separate shaft from knuckle. Knuckle weight must be supported w/ a coat hanger wire to the strut coils.

8) After all my problems, I thought knocking the CV inner joint housing loose from spline shaft might not go well either, but the bar and 3-lb hammer worked easily to bump the housing off the shaft.

9) I tried to replace the boot, but was forced to source a replacement shaft when worn axle parts were found. Installation of new shaft was straightforward, lube splines slightly w/ light coating of grease and firmly push the housing over the spline shaft until fully seated.

10) Reinstall outer axle end in knuckle. Install axle nut loosely to avoid pulling out during reassembly of knuckle to strut.

11) Drop knuckle back over lower arm BJ. This takes a bit of physical effort to lift knuckle, but is doable. I found a spare BJ boot from an Acura TL which fit. Good thing since local Acura did not have a boot in stock.

12) Re-install knuckle to strut w/ 2-bolts. Torque is 116 ft-lbs. I found I had to install upper bolt first. A bit of force aligned lower bolt relatively easily.

13) Re-torque lower BJ nut and install safety clip. Same for tie-rod BJ.

14) I chose to apply the brake w/ a board pushing brake pedal w/ the power seat motor. This allowed the CV axle retaining nut to be torqued w/o wheel on the ground. I first torqued to 150 ft-lbs, and then used a cheater pipe and breaker bar to estimate final torque of 210 ft-lbs.

15) Reinstall wheel.

16) Remove jack stands and lower vehicle to ground.

If I had to do this again (hopefully not too soon), I would try removing the knuckle-strut bolts to see if the knuckle will swing out and around enough to release the CV axle. This would save all work on lower BJ and tie-rod BJ. However, a larger ball joint lifter is needed in case this approach won't work.

Time for a beer!

Regards
 

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Nice post! Both boots on my wife's mdx are leaking so this next week i am going to attempt to replace both cv axles and struts! These detailed instructions rock!! Thanks for explaining hope it goes good!<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
 

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I replaced RF (passenger) CV axle on my MDX today because of a badly leaking inner boot. I thought I would just replace the boot. However, when I removed the boot, the spider rollers and spider arms were badly worn, so I replaced the axle w/ rebuilt shaft from O'Riellys. I hope its a good one.

I haven't seen a detailed post of this procedure, so I'll recount my experience.

I first reviewed the factory procedure and thought this would be a "piece of cake", however I've been stung before w/ factory procedure being too brief and lacking important details. My experience suggests the shop manual leaves out some essential steps.

Next I ran the car up on ramps to see how difficult it would be to drive the CV axle housing off the splined shaft from the transmission. At first glance it looked difficult. There appeared to be no way to get a bar on the back side of the CV housing to apply some jar w/ a hammer to the bar end. However, I have several pry bars and one had a slight offset end which allowed the bar to go over exhaust pipes and contact back side of the axle.

I've removed a few cv axles and thought disconnecting knuckle would be similar to other Acura and Hondas I've worked on. However it didn't work out that way.

1) Loosen axle nut w/ wheel firmly on the ground. No problems here w/ a good air impact. I suspect it would be more challenging w/ a breaker bar and cheater pipe, but doable.

2) Raise vehicle on jack stands using floor jack on front center lift point. I applied support directly from jack stand V-support to the support tabs. This worked well. However, I kept the floor jack supporting some load on the front-center support as a safety. You have to get well under the car to do some of the work, so security of support is a must.

3) Disconnect anti-sway bar link to strut. (About only thing in the manual that worked OK)

4) Disconnect lower ball joint. I first tried rotating the knuckle to pull the axle out to the front. No possible way will this work IMO, but that is only way to remove shaft w/ knuckle completely assembled.

I have a ball joint lifter which has always worked for me, but it was too small for the MDX lower BJ. So I decided to sacrifice the boot and use a wedge fork to break the lower BJ. This worked OK, but damaged boot as anticipated.

5) I decided to also release the tie-rod BJ to allow knuckle to come outward. This was easy w/ the BJ Lifter tool.

6) I released the ABS wheel speed sensor and removed brake line support on strut. I still could not pull the knuckle off the lower BJ. The lower arm and strut are held together by spring force (lower arm wants to go up) which was too much for me to separate BJ from knuckle manually.

7) I removed the strut-knuckle bolts, and finally was able to pull knuckle away from axle shaft end and separate shaft from knuckle. Knuckle weight must be supported w/ a coat hanger wire to the strut coils.

8) After all my problems, I thought knocking the CV inner joint housing loose from spline shaft might not go well either, but the bar and 3-lb hammer worked easily to bump the housing off the shaft.

9) I tried to replace the boot, but was forced to source a replacement shaft when worn axle parts were found. Installation of new shaft was straightforward, lube splines slightly w/ light coating of grease and firmly push the housing over the spline shaft until fully seated.

10) Reinstall outer axle end in knuckle. Install axle nut loosely to avoid pulling out during reassembly of knuckle to strut.

11) Drop knuckle back over lower arm BJ. This takes a bit of physical effort to lift knuckle, but is doable. I found a spare BJ boot from an Acura TL which fit. Good thing since local Acura did not have a boot in stock.

12) Re-install knuckle to strut w/ 2-bolts. Torque is 116 ft-lbs. I found I had to install upper bolt first. A bit of force aligned lower bolt relatively easily.

13) Re-torque lower BJ nut and install safety clip. Same for tie-rod BJ.

14) I chose to apply the brake w/ a board pushing brake pedal w/ the power seat motor. This allowed the CV axle retaining nut to be torqued w/o wheel on the ground. I first torqued to 150 ft-lbs, and then used a cheater pipe and breaker bar to estimate final torque of 210 ft-lbs.

15) Reinstall wheel.

16) Remove jack stands and lower vehicle to ground.

If I had to do this again (hopefully not too soon), I would try removing the knuckle-strut bolts to see if the knuckle will swing out and around enough to release the CV axle. This would save all work on lower BJ and tie-rod BJ. However, a larger ball joint lifter is needed in case this approach won't work.

Time for a beer!

Regards
Hopefully this will help someone. Your hindsight approach does work. You can get away with removing the just the knuckle strut bolts and single bolt holding the ABS sensor line, and swing the knuckle and turn it. It's tight but you can remove the axle this way. No need to mess with the ball joint or the tie rod. I'm relatively sure it could be done with the stabilizer link in place also, though mine was out for replacement anyway. The way that I was able to bump the axle free was with a 36" 1/2 drive extension, up over the top of the exhaust parallel with the axle. You can just get a straight bar onto the end of the axle if you position it just right. Mine was a bit less inclined to come off than yours, the way it sounds. All in all it's back together.

By the way, this was done on a 2004.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
FWIW, I had a nasty experience w/ Autozone CV axles on my 94 Accord EX. For over 1.5 yrs, I had vibration in the drive/engine/body under acceleration. I replaced both CV axles twice w/ AZ warranty replacements w/ no effect. I even replaced the rear motor mount a second time thinking something had to be loose. No change.

I finally decided it had to be the axles and first replaced the long axle w/ a Raxles product. Vibration was down sharply but not totally eliminated. I bought the 2nd axle from Raxles and problem cured. What a releif.

Raxles cost about twice as much as AZ axles w/o core credit, about $130 and over $200 w/o core credit. Raxles won't take an AZ axle as a core credit. Lucky for me they didn't. I went back to AZ and they gave me a store credit car for both axles. I don't think I'll be using any more AZ or O'Riellys axles in future.

good luck
 

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I had similar issues with both Autozone and eBay axles. I didn't have the vibration issue, but in both cases the boot ripped apart within a year. Who cares of they are under warranty with what a pain they are to replace. I only get axles from Acura/Honda now. Cost a bit more, but likely to last well more than 100,000 miles. That's an additional $0.001 cost per mile more than the autozone axles. And worth every fraction of a penny.

FWIW, I had a nasty experience w/ Autozone CV axles on my 94 Accord EX. For over 1.5 yrs, I had vibration in the drive/engine/body under acceleration. I replaced both CV axles twice w/ AZ warranty replacements w/ no effect. I even replaced the rear motor mount a second time thinking something had to be loose. No change.

I finally decided it had to be the axles and first replaced the long axle w/ a Raxles product. Vibration was down sharply but not totally eliminated. I bought the 2nd axle from Raxles and problem cured. What a releif.

Raxles cost about twice as much as AZ axles w/o core credit, about $130 and over $200 w/o core credit. Raxles won't take an AZ axle as a core credit. Lucky for me they didn't. I went back to AZ and they gave me a store credit car for both axles. I don't think I'll be using any more AZ or O'Riellys axles in future.

good luck
 

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I had clicking OEM axle's with torn boots awhile ago so I replaced them with junk EMPI axles. Those lasted about 20k miles and then started to vibrate, and click really bad. Luckily I saved my OEM worn axles, and sent them out to Raxles for rebuilding. The quality of the OEM rebuilds "Raxles" does really makes it worth the price. It cost about $300 including shipping which is double the price of Vatozone aftermarket, but for the extra money you get OEM quality that will outlast 3 or 4 sets of chinese. Well worth the money! The owner of Raxles "Marty" is really a good guy. My rebuilds ride like butter!

Raxles, America's premier supplier of OE quality CV Axles and CV joints - Raxles Inc.
 

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Hopefully this will help someone. Your hindsight approach does work. You can get away with removing the just the knuckle strut bolts and single bolt holding the ABS sensor line, and swing the knuckle and turn it. It's tight but you can remove the axle this way. No need to mess with the ball joint or the tie rod. I'm relatively sure it could be done with the stabilizer link in place also, though mine was out for replacement anyway. The way that I was able to bump the axle free was with a 36" 1/2 drive extension, up over the top of the exhaust parallel with the axle. You can just get a straight bar onto the end of the axle if you position it just right. Mine was a bit less inclined to come off than yours, the way it sounds. All in all it's back together.

By the way, this was done on a 2004.
I had a hard time last week tapping out the RF axle, trying to get a good angle. Once I removed the bolts holding the under-engine exhaust collector, the extra 1" of clearance made it all easy. No need to remove the collector, just pull it down as far as the rubber exhaust mount will allow.
 

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One of my front passenger side inner CV boot was leaking. I ordered the OEM CV boot and went to one of my local mechanic who refuse to change just the boot but the whole axle. So I went to the other favorite mechanic 15 miles away and he charged me only $60 labor to R&R the inner boot. I thought it was a bargain as it took him about one hour to remove the axle & change the boot. Always use OEM boot as the old one lasted more than 90k.
 

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One of my front passenger side inner CV boot was leaking. I ordered the OEM CV boot and went to one of my local mechanic who refuse to change just the boot but the whole axle. So I went to the other favorite mechanic 15 miles away and he charged me only $60 labor to R&R the inner boot. I thought it was a bargain as it took him about one hour to remove the axle & change the boot. Always use OEM boot as the old one lasted more than 90k.
I just went to az today and looked at a reman. I was skeptical becase some of the abs splines had nicks in them. What type of clamp did he use, was it the crimp type or fold over and did it hold up?
 

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I just went to az today and looked at a reman. I was skeptical becase some of the abs splines had nicks in them. What type of clamp did he use, was it the crimp type or fold over and did it hold up?
I didn't check it out while he was replacing the CV boot. The only part I ordered was the OEM front inner CV boot. I think the boot clamped to the axle. So far it 's running smoothly for almost a year.
 

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I'd like to add some supplemental information to this tread. Just went through cv stuff recently. One of my half axles just needed to be reclamped. Boot was in good shape, I suspect the oem's are made out of neoprene and not rubber as they appear to hold up even past 150k. Clamps also seem to hold up. What doesn't is the grease. Mine eventually liquified and was leaking out of the boot (I suspect the inner boot is not air tight / not sealed to allow for expansion and contraction of the boot).

What I found is that the proper boot clamps are hard to find. az & advanced auto did not have the good stuff. Ya have to find a real parts store (one where mechanics get their stuff). I found mine at a place called Symth automotive. They also had the special wind up tool ($10) that tightens it up. Then I pinged the retainer down with a hammer. This kind of clamp is already very tight even without pinging it down. I also bought a pack of cv grease (speedy boot brand). Put that axle back to together and all is well.

Now the other axle had a damaged abs spline so I decided to replace that one. Smyth auto had brand new driver side for $65 (made in china). They appear to be using the crimp type clamp which I believe is not as good as the kind you ping down, but hey the grease will probably wear out before then anyway. Also I'm guessing the probably use rubber boots and not neoprene.

Afterwards I also found a fair amount of salvage yards that had used axles on car-part.com which stand a good chance of being ok (might just need new grease and clamps).

Basically if you decide to replace with "re-manufactured" be very skeptical, inspect all the splines. I suspect a lot of them may just replace boots and clamps and try to resell.

If you rebuild to do it right the axle needs to be removed which really isn't all that hard to do. Should to interesting to see which one holds up longer the brand new Chinese made one or the oem I rebuilt myself.
 

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my 2009 mdx CV boots are leaking. Planning to bring it next week to stealership. I just want to ask if This included in Acura Care Extended warranty?
 

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Obviously too late to help the last poster, but I just did this job today (the grease in both axles had thinned out so much that it was seeping out, so figured might as well replace them; glad I did, the boots were on the verge of tearing anyway).

First, I can confirm (as others have) that you can free the axle from the hub by just disconnecting the knuckle from the strut and pulling it toward you. There's plenty of room to compress the inner joint and bend it out.

Second, each of the axles proved a different kind of challenge to get free of the transmission. On the driver's side, I used my biggest flathead screwdriver to pry it off. I would have loved another 1/2" of clearance to play with, but eventually it popped off.

On the passenger's side, I put a socket on the end of a 3" wobble extension, which I then attached to a 6" wobble extension. I was then able to thread this chain up over the exhaust pipe, put the socket against the axle cup, and bang it out with a couple whacks from a small sledge. Once I got that combination set up and put into place, it was actually easier to pop out than the driver's side.

Hopefully that helps somebody down the road.
 

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After market CV Axles

I had mine replaced by local mechanic shop with aftermarket brand (cannot recall which one), about a month later I start getting vibration again while accelerating, they replace using another aftermarket brand, lasted about a year, now I need to replace again. Several other posts also report similar issues with aftermarket, I'm going with OEM this time.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well my O'Riellly axle installed at front end of this thread was found to be failed today when I was replacing front pads. If I had known earlier I would have purchased an Raxle but press of time means I have to purchase something today. I've gone w/ a new AZ axle.

I just got done removing the old axle. I could not find my 3-lb sledge hammer and no amount of pounding w/ my regular hammer would bump the axle out. I finally managed to remove by prying w/ hammer blows on a pry bar fulcrumed against the exhaust pipe and bearing on the rear of axle housing. I don't recommend this method, but if you don't have a good small sledge hammer you may have to consider this option. No damage to exhaust pipe.

I'm hoping the AZ axle is as good as the O'Riellys it's replacing.

good luck
 
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