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Discussion Starter #1
Finally found some time over the weekend to change the rear diff fluid.
Ordered the DPSF and crush washers(and few other items) from bernardi parts.
Thought it would be an easy task but had trouble getting the fill bolt out. Ended up dropping the spare tire and used power tool to get it out. After that, the process was quite easy. Used a fluid pump to pump DPSF. Drained oil was light brown in color and was not dirty at all, could have easily gone for another 20K miles but I like to stick with recommended schedule. Even the magnetic drain bolt was pretty clean, no residue at all.

Will do transfer case & coolant change during my next oil change.
 

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Are you following your MID for service intervals?
 

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The nice thing about changing the DPSF when it's still relatively fresh is that it doesn't stink like crap like most burnt gear oil does lol
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Are you following your MID for service intervals?
I am the second owner and I don't think the previous owner took good care of the vehicle so going through a round of fluid changes and fixes. Anyway, my MDX is currently at 54K miles, so few fluid changes are overdue.

BTW, I am yet to see any notification on MID regarding service.
 

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The rear diff relies on friction modifiers in the fluid to keep things smooth. The friction modifiers degrade much more rapidly than the base oil, so don't go by appearance of the drained fluid. If in doubt, change it! Cheap insurance.
 

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What trouble did you have that you had to drop the spare?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What trouble did you have that you had to drop the spare?
Fill bolt was too tight for me to get it out with a hand tool, so, dropped the spare to get more room for my electric impact tool. I did all the work without jacking the car up, so space was kind of tight.
 

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What trouble did you have that you had to drop the spare?
Fill bolt was too tight for me to get it out with a hand tool, so, dropped the spare to get more room for my electric impact tool. I did all the work without jacking the car up, so space was kind of tight.
Ahh. Were you trying to use a wobble extension through the hole? I found with mine the first time I attempted to crack it open it was too tight. I had to attach the ratchet directly to the plug and it popped open.

Glad you made sure you can get the fill open before you drained ??
 

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Most ratchets to too short for any meaningful leverage, get yourself a 3/8" drive breaker bar for difficult to remove hardware.
 

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Most ratchets to too short for any meaningful leverage, get yourself a 3/8" drive breaker bar for difficult to remove hardware.
Or just us a 1/2" to 3/8" socket adapter on a 1/2" ratchet and the additional length and heft of the 1/2 ratchet provides the leverage for loosening tighter nuts/bolts/etc. These adapters are included in many socket sets and otherwise are easy to find and inexpensive. I use it on my 1/2" torque wrench as well, which is pretty long handled and provides a lot of leverage. I then use the torque wrench anyway to re-install the plug and torque to spec.

I can't remember exactly which wrench setup I used for removing the rear diff plug (probably the 1/2" torque wrench with the 1/2 to 3/8 adapter) but I don't remember it as being any problem getting it loose, and I was the first one to loosen it.
 

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^^

For rear differential the extension will need to be long enough to fit through the hole in the frame. Otherwise the 3/8 fits right into the plug without the need for an extension which for me I like better.

https://youtu.be/dz64reYyb6Q
 

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^^ I have lots of different extensions so that's not anything I really even think much about - I just use whichever one seems appropriate for the purpose. I mostly wanted to point out that a convenient and easy way to get additional leverage for some of these applications is to use a 1/2" wrench with a 1/2 to 3/8 converter on it - the longer handle of the 1/2" ratchet, and especially of the 1/2" torque wrench, makes removing some stubborn 3/8 items much easier.
 

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^^ I have lots of different extensions so that's not anything I really even think much about - I just use whichever one seems appropriate for the purpose. I mostly wanted to point out that a convenient and easy way to get additional leverage for some of these applications is to use a 1/2" wrench with a 1/2 to 3/8 converter on it - the longer handle of the 1/2" ratchet, and especially of the 1/2" torque wrench, makes removing some stubborn 3/8 items much easier.
Your 1/2" ratchet may be longer than your 3/8" ratchet... but that is not a universal truth.

My primary 3/8" ratchet is a flex head with a long handle -- longer than my standard 1/2" ratchet handle.

Of course I've got a 2' and 3' breaker bar for when I need a little more leverage. 0:)
 
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^^ But my 1/2" torque wrench is longer than your primary 3/8 flex ratchet. ;)


...I have a 3/8 flex ratchet that has a longer handle than a standard 3/8 ratchet as well and also have breaker bars. Nevertheless, the 1/2 to 3/8 trick works well in a number of occasions - try it sometime if you haven't already done so.

When it comes to tools there's often more than one way to twist a bolt.
 
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