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Hello Folks

Proud and Happy 2016 Pilot owner here. Purchased brand new. It came with Bridgestone Dueler HP Sport AS tires

Those tires have a 40,000 mile warranty. I am almost half-way there.

With that said, and as one who is OCD with tires/maintenance, I am planning ahead for the next set.

What brand/etc tire have folks found to be good for this car. My 2004 Pilot, the mid-2000's everybody was putting Michelin Cross Terrains on them, with great satisfaction. Wondering if a similar recommendation exists for these new models yet

Lean towards Michelin brand, FYI



Thank you
 

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Michelin Premier LTX is my choice.
 

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I just replaced the original worn Continentals on my 2014 MDX with Michelin Premier LTX. I researched tires quite a bit and ended up with a tossup between Michelin Defender and Michelin Premier LTX and went with the latter.
 

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I also went with the Michelin Premier LTX in the end. Costco had a deal on them (and the Defender LTX), so America's Tire price matched it for me. They are quite a bit smoother and quieter than the OEM Contis. Wife loves them and the MDX her is primary daily now.
 

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I own both a 17 Honda Pilot and 14 MDX and will state my opinion. I have the stock Continentals on the Pilot currently and while they have been OK, I'm just not a fan of them when compared to my previous experiences with them vs Michelin and Pirelli. I just installed the 20" Pirelli Scorpian Verda A/S on my MDX and while I cannot speak to the longevity of them yet, I can state that the overall experience has been very positive (smooth ride, quiet, good grip, etc) and they were less money than the Michelin. When the stock Continentals need replacing on the Pilot, I'll likely go with Pirelli's at that time, assuming my existing set on MDX don't disappoint.
 

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Michelin Premier LTX is my choice.
Hands down for all season radials, especially if you live in a part of the country where you have to drive in snow and ice, the Michelin Premier LTX is the best option.

I did a lot of research online to figure out what all season radials to get for my FX35, I live in MN and have to deal with extreme cold as well as snow and ice. My OEM Bridgestone Dueller HP's suck in snow, so I wanted something better in winter performance. After reading all sorts of reviews and ratings online the Premier LTX was rated the best in nearly every category, so I decided to buy a set and I haven't been disappointed.

I got new Premier LTX this fall and after driving the past few months in winter I can say I believe I made the right choice. These are probably the best all season radials you can get for year round traction in all weather conditions. Also very quiet on the road.
 

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I actually went the other way than most people here and got the Defender LTX M/Ses. On TireRack.com, they get as good as if not a better rating in all categories from buyers. They also have a longer treadwear warranty - 70,000 vs 60,000 miles. The tires went on my wife's MDX, which only gets driven around 7500 miles/year, so I wasn't terribly concerned with the possibility of a lower mpg vis-a-vis the Premiers. But their biggest draw for me was their reported snow/ice performance. Because of how little she drives it's not really worth it to get a separate set of winter wheels & tires for the MDX. From what I've read/heard, the Defenders' have superb snow/ice performance for an "all"-season tire.
 

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If you want year-round tires in snow country you don't want all-season tires, you're far better off with all-weather tires for winter conditions. These are essentially all-season but with proper severe snow service rating (mountain-snowflake logo on sidewall). The Michelins are fine for all-season but can't hold a candle to Nokian WR-G3s or the comparable Toyo model in winter conditions, which rank in the middle of the pack compared to winter tires. Goodyear and Goodrich also offer all-weather tires. They are mostly intended for areas with occasional winter conditions, or trips up skiing. If you don't have to deal with snow then the Michelins, Pirellis, or others would be a better choice.

I drove on Nokian WR-G2 and WR-G3 (different generations) for more than a decade and loved them in all conditions. When the OEM Michelins get worn a bit more (before next winter) I will be putting on the newly announced Nokian WR-G4 SUV tires.
 

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If you want year-round tires in snow country you don't want all-season tires, you're far better off with all-weather tires for winter conditions. These are essentially all-season but with proper severe snow service rating (mountain-snowflake logo on sidewall). The Michelins are fine for all-season but can't hold a candle to Nokian WR-G3s or the comparable Toyo model in winter conditions, which rank in the middle of the pack compared to winter tires. Goodyear and Goodrich also offer all-weather tires. They are mostly intended for areas with occasional winter conditions, or trips up skiing. If you don't have to deal with snow then the Michelins, Pirellis, or others would be a better choice.

I drove on Nokian WR-G2 and WR-G3 (different generations) for more than a decade and loved them in all conditions. When the OEM Michelins get worn a bit more (before next winter) I will be putting on the newly announced Nokian WR-G4 SUV tires.
How well do these fare once the weather turns 90+ degrees in summer? Are they a true all-season radial with rubber that won't burn up in the summer but still stays soft enough to be productive in winter? Also what mileage are they rated for and how's tread pattern for road noise?

For true winter performance obviously you want dedicated snow tires, however that requires you to have 2 sets of wheels one for winter and one for summer.
 

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Hello Folks

What brand/etc tire have folks found to be good for this car. My 2004 Pilot, the mid-2000's everybody was putting Michelin Cross Terrains on them, with great satisfaction. Wondering if a similar recommendation exists for these new models yet

Lean towards Michelin brand, FYI



Thank you
I think it would be helpful if you let us know what kind of driving conditions you usually encounter and what you're looking for in a tire.

Both of the Michelins recommended in this thread are good, but they're not a "one size fits all" solution. I know it's been mentioned in the forum that the Premier LTX seem to do better in comfort, and wet and dry handling while the Defenders should be better in terms of winter traction and tread wear. Based on what I wanted in a tire, I ended up choosing the Defender LTX.

There's also a "Tires" subforum in the 3rd Gen MDX area if you're interested in doing more reading. Here's the link:
Tires - Acura MDX Forum : Acura MDX SUV Forums

If you're not averse to trying out a non-Michelin tire, I'd say to at least stick with one of the more reputable brands.
 

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How well do these fare once the weather turns 90+ degrees in summer? Are they a true all-season radial with rubber that won't burn up in the summer but still stays soft enough to be productive in winter? Also what mileage are they rated for and how's tread pattern for road noise?
That's a lot of questions - if interested you should do some research on the web. As for heat, I usually have only a couple of weeks over 90 (daytime highs, much lower at night) so I can't personally attest to that other than to note that I have never noticed any degradation in performance (on my old car). They are rated 105H (load 2039#, speed 130mph). The warranty is for 5 years, 50k treadlife (UTQG 600AA) - but I have never put any faith in the treadlife warranty of any tire as they are mostly a scam to sell replacement tires. The SUV versions appear to be a little more aggressive than the car versions; I never noticed noise on my car but reviews for the SUV version do note some noise and some lower treadlife as the cons for this tire - take a look around for the reviews as they are extremely positive.

For true winter performance obviously you want dedicated snow tires, however that requires you to have 2 sets of wheels one for winter and one for summer.
No, I don't agree. When I wrote that they tested in the middle of the winter tires that means that half of the winter tires get worse performance, so you stand a good chance to get worse performance with winter tires. And guaranteed you will get much worse performance on dry pavement with winter tires. The arguments for separate winter and summer tires are 1) you live in an area where the roads are covered with snow for months at a time, and 2) you want high performance in the summer. For the first, unless you are buying the very best (Nokian Hak's or Blizzaks) for winter use there is no advantage. There is no argument with the second: if you are going to drive hard on winding roads in the summer then performance tires will have a speed advantage but probably not a treadlife advantage. So it is possible to get a small advantage if you are willing to spend the money for the best of both winter and summer tires, but that doesn't mean you will always have the right tires mounted. Around here it can rain a lot pretty much any time of year, and the WR's high resistance to hydroplaning is thus always nice to have. YMMV
 

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For true winter performance obviously you want dedicated snow tires. . . .
This isn't necessarily true. In dry conditions winter tires may actually take a longer distance to stop than summer tires.



 

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There's obviously a thousand variables to consider and exceptions to every rule. Anyone can cherry pick specific examples of certain tires and/or conditions that may draw different conclusions. In the end there is no such thing as a "perfect" tire for all weather conditions. Each seasonal specific design (all season vs winter vs summer) all make trade-offs based on the road conditions they are designed for.

All I was attempting to say is that in general, most people recommend if you live in a part of the country where winters can be severe with both very cold temperatures as well as slush, snow and ice for several months at a time (such as MN, ND, etc) then a tire designed for winter specifically will typically outperform an all season radial. I had a rear wheel drive G37s with summer tires on it, which was obviously great in the summer but worthless in winter. I bought a set of Blizzak's and it drove like a completely different vehicle. I didn't try out all variants of winter tires in order to identify if there is another tire that would perform better.

As to the "winter" vs "summer" tire discussion, for most people this means driving on your stock or all season radials in the summer with a dedicated winter tire in winter. Obviously a cheap winter tire isn't going to perform as well as a Blizzak for example, so not all winter tires are created equal. The reason for winter specific tires is because stock all season radials don't drive very well in 3-6 inches of snow or slush or ice. No you will not have 3" of snow on the roads at all times. But when you drive every day and snow comes and goes for 4 months, it's nice to have a tire that can handle inclement weather when it inevitably does come (again provided you live in a part of the country where you truly experience winter conditions for several months straight). I'd gladly sacrifice some stopping distance on dry pavement for better traction in snow and ice considering where I live roads are very rarely dry and in pristine condition in the winter.

Since all season tires are designed to operate in a wide range of temperature conditions as well as need to handle dry roads, wet roads to prevent hydroplaning, as well as handle snow and ice. Addressing each means trade-offs for specific conditions.

If you live in a part of the country that very rarely gets snow or ice and/or the temperature isn't below freezing for 3 months straight, which is likely the majority of people on this forum, then I agree a dedicated winter tire isn't for you as to points made earlier you'll be making sacrifices on road conditions you're likely to encounter a majority of the time (dry roads, wet roads, relatively warm temperatures).
 

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Agree with that. Where do you live? If I were living in NH or VT as I once did then winter tires are a no-brainer. I have friends who live up in Sand Point, ID, and that is another place for winter tires. In those places the transition periods are typically short and predictable as well, so it does make sense to simply swap wheels twice a year. OTOH if I lived in SoCal I would probably go straight to summer tires and not even own all-seasons. The point I was trying to make is that all-weather tires are easily good enough for occasional snow storms, with the benefit of meeting certain legal requirements in some places, and all-season tires are not. Also, they are better for wet conditions year-round, and especially for hydroplaning.

Yesterday I spent some time checking reviews and found it enlightening. One guy ("Jimmy the Banker") compared the WR G3s on a Highlander to the Nokian snow tires he had a year earlier, and not surprisingly found that they were much better in snow than all-seasons but the dedicated winter tires were just that much better. Of course he was comparing them to what is considered one of the very best winter tires, and there is a lot of dross out there - simply buying any old winter tire will in no way guarantee an improvement over all-weather. Other reviews compared all-season, all-weather, and winter tires on a single car under identical conditions; no surprise that the all-weather performed in between the other two (for better or worse). It is clear that all-seasons are a bad idea for winter driving, and winter tires are a bad idea in summer but also pretty poor on cold, dry roads. The all-weather tires work adequately in all conditions but won't match the performance of the specialized tires in their intended use.

I have been a fan of Nokians because of my experience with them but I am not necessarily arguing for them but rather the all-weather category. The Toyo Celsius have been out for a few years now and are very competitive with the Nokians. The Goodyear and Goodrich offerings are just too new to say much about. I certainly would like to see Michelin come out with an all-weather tire - they have some highly rated all-season and winter tires so are clearly in a great position to produce an all-weather tire, and their marketing would help gain acceptance. BTW there is a push in the industry to rebrand "all-season" to "3-season" to more accurately describe them. Good idea.
 

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If you live in a part of the country that very rarely gets snow or ice and/or the temperature isn't below freezing for 3 months straight, which is likely the majority of people on this forum, then I agree a dedicated winter tire isn't for you as to points made earlier you'll be making sacrifices on road conditions you're likely to encounter a majority of the time (dry roads, wet roads, relatively warm temperatures).
Parts of Texas have had more snow this "winter" than most of Wisconsin. Just sayin...

I don't disagree about dedicated winter tires, but it's a big gamble to run summer performance tires all the time in most of the USA. I have helped push performance cars out of their parking spaces after 0.5 inches of snowfall because their summer performance tires couldn't deal with the 0.5% grade away from the curb. Now imagine what happens on the highway. "All-season" tires vary in their winter capabilities, but few are as bad on ice and snow as summer performance tires. BTW, ice can form on overpasses when there isn't a snowflake within a hundred miles. IIRC Florida has had multiple freeze events in the past couple years.

I am happy with the Michelin Defender LTX M/S tires I installed on my 2016 Pilot Touring last spring. But they get a rest for winter when I swap on the Blizzaks. I spend much of the winter actively chasing snow, so it makes sense to be able to deal with it when I find it. :grin:

Another advantage of the Defender LTX is they are better for light off-road use than most "passenger car" all-season tires.

I'm still not sure about the next pair of 3-season shoes for my wife's 2014 MDX, but the Defenders have a healthy lead over Premiers at the moment. Partially because of tread wear, but also because our seasonal changes are a bit unpredictable.
 

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Parts of Texas have had more snow this "winter" than most of Wisconsin. Just sayin...

I don't disagree about dedicated winter tires, but it's a big gamble to run summer performance tires all the time in most of the USA.
I'd be willing to gamble that no part of Texas has had more snow this winter then here in MN. The past week alone we've gotten over a foot of snow, my back yard probably has a good 3-4 feet of snow. And we're still below average for a typical winter. We don't see temps below freezing, and thus impossible for ice on the road, from Mid-may through September usually. Late October is usually our first chance at measurable snow fall. So October is a logical time to swap between "summer" and "winter" tires.

In my previous posts I didn't intend to imply that I ran "summer performance tires". What I meant was that my standard all season radials don't do jack in winter so I needed a 2nd set of tires for winter. I purchased dedicated winter Blizzak snow tires for the "winter", meaning my all season radials would now become my "summer tires".

I've never purchased dedicated summer performance tires, my G37s came with them from the factory so I wasn't about to throw away brand new tires. But that was a sports car, not an SUV.

In an SUV like the MDX, regardless of where you live, you'd be better served with a solid performing all season or all weather tire. A true high performance summer tire doesn't belong on the MDX at all in my opinion because the MDX isn't a high performance sports car.
 

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... all-weather tires are easily good enough for occasional snow storms, with the benefit of meeting certain legal requirements in some places, and all-season tires are not.
I guess I wasn't making the distinction between "all weather" and "all season" tires as separate categories. To your point people buying tires should base that decision on road conditions they are likely to face a vast majority of the time. If where you live you'll only see an inch of light snow twice a year, then perhaps an "all season" tire isn't for you and you'd be better served by an "all weather" tire. Regardless of the category it would be important to look at reviews and ratings to as not all tires are created equal. If you get a lot of rain you want something that is highly rated for hydroplaning.

Most AWD SUVs from the factory I'd assume come stock with some form of "all season" tire correct? For most people the OEM tires are just fine for a vast majority of driving conditions. I only complained about my FX35 stock Dueller HP's in the snow and ice, other then that they were fine the rest of the time.
 

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It seems this is a pretty sensible group. I love it when people argue that they want high performance tires on their SUV. Acura encourages them by saying the MDX handles like a sports sedan; having owned a sports sedan for the previous 30 years I think that is just laughable. The MDX handles better than any other mid-size SUV in its price range, but the ground clearance and suspension don't deliver "performance" handling no matter which tire is used, and most of us don't want to live with the low treadwear ratings.

I'm glad I was able to get the "all-weather" category across to at least one person. Whether it is the right choice or not is another matter. I just think it is important that it is understood that all-seasons are not designed to operate in snow, and are really rather dangerous there, while the all-weather are good (not necessarily great) there. It seems it is an option that is not commonly known.
 
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