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What tire PSI do you keep your 2nd gen MDX's tires inflated at?

  • 28-32 psi

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 32-36 psi

    Votes: 9 90.0%
  • 36-40 psi

    Votes: 1 10.0%
  • 40 or greated psi

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    10
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Discussion Starter #1
So it seems that 32psi is an optimal/commonly recommended tire psi that many 2nd Gen MDX owners keep their air pressure at in their tires year round.....i have 255 55 R18 tires on my MDX (using the stock sport wheels- common on the 2007-2009 MDX)...is 32 PSI in fact the best PSI to keep your tires inflated on year round? Does the wheel size affect this recommended '32 psi' setting, is this number universal in terms of good tire pressure for all tires regardless of wheel/tire size?

I came across a thread here where one Acura vehicle owner keeps their tires inflated at up to 45psi year round! (which seems excessive to me)...I have always tried to keep my PSI around 32-35psi year round, and have noticed that this week (temperatures in Detroit, MI have dipped down to near zero) that my recently inflated tires (@32psi each) are now all reading about 29psi in the morning....

What tire PSI do you try best to keep your 2nd gen MDX tires inflated at?
 

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Remember that the PSI is spec´d while COLD once the tires heat up you should see 35-36PSI which is optimal for Highway use..
If your area is too cold you should see a drop in PSI as the colder the tire gets you lose PSI.. So if you Sped´c out 32PSI at 32°F it wont be the same reading when outside is at 28°F.
If you live in a constant freezing area then you would want to Spec´d the tires when HOT to your desired pressure (34-35PSI) so when the car gets colder it will lower to a steady 31-32PSI.
I personally run them on 34-35PSI Cold so my running pressure is about 37-38PSI (Tire maximum pressure for my tires is 44PSI).. This way I can have the least rolling resistance for best MPG gains.

This comes at a loss though.. The more you inflate the stiffer the tire gets which ruins the Ride...
So the lowest the PSI = Best Ride/Less MPGs, The highest the PSI = Worse Ride/Higher MPGs.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Remember that the PSI is spec´d while COLD once the tires heat up you should see 35-36PSI which is optimal for Highway use..
If your area is too cold you should see a drop in PSI as the colder the tire gets you lose PSI.. So if you Sped´c out 32PSI at 32°F it wont be the same reading when outside is at 28°F.
If you live in a constant freezing area then you would want to Spec´d the tires when HOT to your desired pressure (34-35PSI) so when the car gets colder it will lower to a steady 31-32PSI.
I personally run them on 34-35PSI Cold so my running pressure is about 37-38PSI (Tire maximum pressure for my tires is 44PSI).. This way I can have the least rolling resistance for best MPG gains.

This comes at a loss though.. The more you inflate the stiffer the tire gets which ruins the Ride...
So the lowest the PSI = Best Ride/Less MPGs, The highest the PSI = Worse Ride/Higher MPGs.
thanks- yes I always consider the reading of my 2nd gen. MDX's tires PSI before the car is even started/driven....even though I maintain PSI in all tires at about 32PSI, during these last few days, the PSI on all tires have dropped down to about 29psi on the digital reader/dashboard at startup...any more loss and the 'low tire pressure' alert will eventually rear its head :surprise:
 

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I have 255/45/20 Conti DWS 06 tires and I usually put around 34-35 in summer and 35-37 winter according to the TPMS (not hand help gauge). The PSI always goes up in summer because of the heat. It can sometimes drop 1-4 PSI depending on how cold it is in the winter.

I also have to adjust a little because of +5000 feet of altitude. A hand held gauge can be 1-3 PSI or more off the higher you go in altitude compared to TPMS.

I think hand held gauges are calibrated for sea level and you are comparing the tire PSI to the outside air pressure. TPMS is just reading the tire PSI only. I'm really just guess-i-mating and splitting the difference as long as I'm above 28-29 PSI on the coldest morning.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have 255/45/20 Conti DWS 06 tires and I usually put around 34-35 in summer and 35-37 winter according to the TPMS (not hand help gauge). The PSI always goes up in summer because of the heat. It can sometimes drop 1-4 PSI depending on how cold it is in the winter.

I also have to adjust a little because of +5000 feet of altitude. A hand held gauge can be 1-3 PSI or more off the higher you go in altitude compared to TPMS.

I think hand held gauges are calibrated for sea level and you are comparing the tire PSI to the outside air pressure. TPMS is just reading the tire PSI only. I'm really just guess-i-mating and splitting the difference as long as I'm above 28-29 PSI on the coldest morning.
Thanks- I managed to secure a brand new set of Continental (Ultra High Performance All-Season) Continental EXTREMECONTACT DWS 06 255/55ZR18 that's being held for me at a local tire Midwest chain tire shop...final price with tax (including mounting, TPMS kit, road hazard protection etc.) is a little bit over $900 total...

considering these will be on my MDX (daily driver) year round, overall I feel comfortable with this tire particular selection and may keep the PSI on these new tires around 35-37 PSI as well (though I don't know if it will matter that you have 20 inch wheels and I'm still using the 18 x 8 stock wheels...)- of if wheel/tire size is irrelevant when it comes to recommended tire PSI. :nerd:

<img src="http://www.tirerack.com/images/trans.gif" width="60%" height="60%">
 

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All season 18" stock alloy wheels = 34-35 PSI

Winters 17" Steel wheels = 34-35 PSI

I keep the same PSI on my wife's Mazda 3 all weather/winters.
 

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PSI is dependent on the make of your tires and as well the conditions you drive in and the vehicle itself.

With the Sport shocks and 120+K, I run 40PSI in the rears and 35 on the fronts. That reduces rear tire wear and keeps them from cupping/feathering even though the alignment is spot on. As well I get great feedback from the steering and don't loose traction at all. This is with the Dunlop SP Sport Signatures. Going to put on Pirelli's soon and will post the finalized pressures.
 

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Some folks like to run the front tires at a slightly higher pressure than the rears to give a crisper steering feel and less sidewall roll over when turning. My rule of thumb is if running the stock tire/rim size for any vehicle is to go by the sticker on the front door jam/pillar. Always best to see what your tire pressure of choice actually does to the wear pattern on your tires. Any tire shop can look at your tires and tell you if you are running too high a pressure or too low. High pressure tends to show a wear pattern more in the center portion of the tread and less so to the outsides. Low pressure shows just the opposite. Perfect pressure = even wear. If you don't want to fuss with adjusting tire pressures due to changes in temperature, consider having your tires inflated with Nitrogen at your tire dealer. Nitrogen expands/contracts much less than "air". They might put green caps on your valve stems.
 

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35psi here.

Also remember since you live in an urban area, the more your tires are inflated, the less chance for rim damage on potholes. For your situation though it shouldn't be as noticeable since you are riding on factory setup. Also temp variations will reduce pressure. IIRC every 10 deg change in temps can reduce pressure by 1psi.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
went to tire shop this past weekend and had some brand new Continental EXTREMECONTACT DWS 06 255/55ZR18 tires installed on my 2009 MDX with the TPMS rebuild kits (for which the young tire STEALERSHIP rep. kind of tried to pull a fast one on me at the last moment)- he wanted to add additional charges for the TPMS rebuild kit just prior to swiping my card- good thing i called the store the day before and spoke to (and quoted) Manager to quote the FINAL, out the door price (with tax and WITH TPMS kit rebuild kit already, definitively included)-- the tire shop minion representative couldn't drain an additional $50 from me this time and I could see the anguish on his poor little face...bwaahahaha...>:)

in any event, haven't had much time to assess the new tires (at least they look new and still have the red marker line along the outer tread of each tire) as my 2nd gen MDX is currently at the dealership having warranty work done- but I did notice that all new Continental tires were registering about a 40psi tire pressure (cold) reading when I had left the tire stealership...i'll see how this 40 PSI/tire setting rides in the near future, I can always lower it down to about 35psi later if necessary...:wink:
 
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