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Discussion Starter #1
I need to do a brake job on my 2004 MDX. I've never been happy with the amount of brake force required to stop the car. I don't think this is a reflection of any substandard brake part, seems it's just how the vehicle is. Before I buy the normal array of rotors and pads I'd like to ask if anyone has any thoughts how to address this. For example, would track pads (EBC yellow) be the easiest/lowest cost way to address this or perhaps the master cylinder is under powered for the vehicle and that is the issue?
 

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My 2006 MDX has more brake aggressiveness than any vehicle I've owned, though I've mostly driven SUVs and sedans that aren't known for awesome brakes.

Does yours have a OEM brake booster, and no vacuum leaks? Have you followed the service manual troubleshooting for low brake performance? Moisture in brake fluid can cause bad performance.

You could look for slotted rotors which release out gassing for better performance at the expense of pad life.

I'm planning on trying Akebono pads next time, which Scotty Kilmer likes for a good mix of performance and longevity with low dusting.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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My MDX came (from the previous owner) with slotted rotors. I never liked them, because I could feel the slight oscillation from the slots. The MDX is a 4,400 pound SUV, so it's never going to have "sports car brakes". I do believe that there would be pads that are a little stickier that might improve the braking, but if you are getting the telltale ABS pedal shaking when you plant your foot on the brake pedal, you're not going to stop any faster with the stickier pads - you'll just get to the ABS point with a little less pressure on the pedal.

FWIW, my "real braking challenge" was a 12,000 pound RV with three "axles". Disc brakes up front (which always worked pretty well) and two "bogie" rear "axles". After some research, I put fatter slave cylinders on the middle axle (since it is capable of more braking force without locking up the wheels than the rear axle), and sticky pads all around. That improved the braking so that every drive in traffic was no longer a white-knuckler... still won't stop as fast as a car (or even an MDX), but it's a WHOLE lot better. So yeah, sticky pads do work. ;-)
 

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Any idea the history on a brake fluid flush? Nasty old brake fluid that has accumulated water can certainly impact brake feel.
Good point. I will change the brake fluid, but the last time I did that (a few years ago) braking feel didn't improve.

I am used to smaller cars that handle better than a heavy SUV, so I suppose that has something to do with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My 2006 MDX has more brake aggressiveness than any vehicle I've owned, though I've mostly driven SUVs and sedans that aren't known for awesome brakes.

Does yours have a OEM brake booster, and no vacuum leaks? Have you followed the service manual troubleshooting for low brake performance? Moisture in brake fluid can cause bad performance.

You could look for slotted rotors which release out gassing for better performance at the expense of pad life.

I'm planning on trying Akebono pads next time, which Scotty Kilmer likes for a good mix of performance and longevity with low dusting.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
I haven't tested the booster for a vacuum leak so I will try that. The engine runs beautifully though so if I had to guess I would say it's not a vacuum leak.
 

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My MDX came (from the previous owner) with slotted rotors. I never liked them, because I could feel the slight oscillation from the slots. The MDX is a 4,400 pound SUV, so it's never going to have "sports car brakes". I do believe that there would be pads that are a little stickier that might improve the braking, but if you are getting the telltale ABS pedal shaking when you plant your foot on the brake pedal, you're not going to stop any faster with the stickier pads - you'll just get to the ABS point with a little less pressure on the pedal.

FWIW, my "real braking challenge" was a 12,000 pound RV with three "axles". Disc brakes up front (which always worked pretty well) and two "bogie" rear "axles". After some research, I put fatter slave cylinders on the middle axle (since it is capable of more braking force without locking up the wheels than the rear axle), and sticky pads all around. That improved the braking so that every drive in traffic was no longer a white-knuckler... still won't stop as fast as a car (or even an MDX), but it's a WHOLE lot better. So yeah, sticky pads do work. ;-)
What pads did you use?
 

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I know exactly what you're referring to the brake pedal requires an "unnatural" amount of brake force/more than you'd expect which required some getting used to in my '03, but I prefer a harder pedal to a softer one. I believe they recalibrated braking in the '05 and '06 both the '06's I have require very minimal effort compared to my '03 and have a much more predictable brake pedal. its a night and day difference. I just did all four rotors and pads rear calipers and a brake flush on my '03 and the brake pedal still has the same "feel" so i don't know if theres anything you can do unless you can figure out exactly what they changed on the newer ones.
 

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On our 06, I’ve tried Hawk heavy duty pads that were supposed to improve stopping in front with stock rotors. Didn’t notice any significant improvement in stopping but the extra dust was a pain. The EBCs might dust more but maybe worth it if you really need extra stopping power or less fade.

I ended up going with Hawk slotted rotors up front and Alebono pads all around. I went with slotted to keep the pad wear flat and that does work. I would describe the Akes as having as good as stock stopping with less dust and much better price.

Braking also depends on tire and extra weight. On the tires you might check tread and braking grade for A rating. I’ve run SUV style Michelins since new except for Yokohamas one time and I got rid of those early as they were too soft when cornering. Braking didn’t seem diminished with the Yokos.
 

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I need to do a brake job on my 2004 MDX. I've never been happy with the amount of brake force required to stop the car. I don't think this is a reflection of any substandard brake part, seems it's just how the vehicle is. Before I buy the normal array of rotors and pads I'd like to ask if anyone has any thoughts how to address this. For example, would track pads (EBC yellow) be the easiest/lowest cost way to address this or perhaps the master cylinder is under powered for the vehicle and that is the issue?
You need something like that
 

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I need to do a brake job on my 2004 MDX. I've never been happy with the amount of brake force required to stop the car. I don't think this is a reflection of any substandard brake part, seems it's just how the vehicle is. Before I buy the normal array of rotors and pads I'd like to ask if anyone has any thoughts how to address this. For example, would track pads (EBC yellow) be the easiest/lowest cost way to address this or perhaps the master cylinder is under powered for the vehicle and that is the issue?
I shop through CardID.com. Buying performance braking for my 2012 MDX advanced. I also pull a 4500lbs trailer
 
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