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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My 2014 MDX SH-AWD Tech just reached 83k and dealer suggested that I replace the rear brake pads. Detroit area Acura dealer quoted me $300 for rear PADS only, and another $170 for brake fluid flush! I tried to bargain for a couple percentage discount, but they wouldn't budge. I did some research and found out that genuine Acura pads are just $45 a set (rear wheels). So I did some Youtube learning and was able to replace the rotors & pads for both Front and Rear plus brake fluid flush at around $450 for parts cost. It's actually easier than I had imagine. I have been an avid "dealer only" guy for all my maintenance and oil changes....but after that crazy quote just for rear pads, I decided to learn DIY maintenance jobs and ended up doing all of the following for my 83k MDX in a week:
1. Brake rotors & pads replacement
2. Brake fluid flush
3. Tire rotation
4. Rear differential fluid change
5. Transfer case fluid change
6. ATF transmission fluid change (3x3)
7. Engine air filter & cabin filter replacements (they normally charged me $50-$60 per filter!)
8. Engine oil & filter change

I can't believe how much we can learn from Google & Youtube nowadays. Had that dealer agreed to give me a $100 discount, I wouldn't have known how to do these basic maintenances myself. I'm a very meticulous person, so I'm really enjoy doing all these works myself and feel like I can trust myself more than Acura techs now (LOL). Anyhow, enough of my bragging. I just want to share this major accomplishment as the result of reading & learning from many helpful tips from this forum. Thank you!

P.S.
Does anybody have some tips or helpful instruction on flushing the coolant fluid? That job seems the most complicated for me at the moment. TYIA.
 

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It's super easy. It's just a drain and refill.

I can't attach the service manual page from tapatalk stupidly but basically on the bottom of the radiator and engine block are two drain ports. Then dump the coolant from the overflow tank. Then refill radiator and coolant overflow tank, then purge air bubbles by running the engine with loose rad cap until the fan comes on twice (this i actually don't like about acuras's procedure, as you basically just get coolant dumping from the radiator fill neck when an air bubble reaches it, so use a towel around the neck. On other cars, i run the heater full hot and run the car to temp and wait for the fans. Then when the car is stone cold the next morning, i top off the rad and overflow). Then turn off the car, check the rad and overflow and top off. Then rad cap back on and run again and check for leaks.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

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Does anybody have some tips or helpful instruction on flushing the coolant fluid? That job seems the most complicated for me at the moment. TYIA.
Well done. I do most of them in my garage as well, unless I don't have proper tool(s) and/or experiencing problem to remove parts. I don't recall when the coolant fluid is required (code 5), but I have my technician perform that while changing timing belt and water pump on my 1st Gen MDX and TL.
 
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks Neoshi & JTM.

Neoshi, is there any way you can send mea screenshot of the locations of drain plugs, especially on the engine block? Thank you in advance!

Below is the Youtube link to flush out coolant in a Honda pilot. Is the coolant drain on engine block the same @2:20 minute into the video?
 

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I love hearing this. Great Job.

This was exactly me and something similar happened and it was the waiting time that put me over the edge.

I hope you came across one of my videos on YouTube (DIY Dave)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, LocalBar. Your videos are in my Acura MDX Youtube library. Thank you soooo much for the bag trick when removing the oil filter. I did it for my MDX and showed my brother in law this trick on his RDX too. He was impressed!
 

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Yes, LocalBar. Your videos are in my Acura MDX Youtube library. Thank you soooo much for the bag trick when removing the oil filter. I did it for my MDX and showed my brother in law this trick on his RDX too. He was impressed!
Makes me warm inside to hear that. Try one of these next: Form-a-Funnel

Form a Funnel Reusable Flexible Draining Tool Deformable and Quick cleaning Funnel Funnel Extended for Pour olive vegetable oil Car oil (14.6 X 6.7 INCH) (Silica Gel material) Amazon.com: Form a Funnel Reusable Flexible Draining Tool Deformable and Quick cleaning Funnel Funnel Extended for Pour olive vegetable oil Car oil (14.6 X 6.7 INCH) (Silica Gel material): Kitchen & Dining
 
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Thanks Neoshi & JTM.

Neoshi, is there any way you can send mea screenshot of the locations of drain plugs, especially on the engine block? Thank you in advance!

Below is the Youtube link to flush out coolant in a Honda pilot. Is the coolant drain on engine block the same @2:20 minute into the video?
Yep it's the same engine block so should be.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

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I am also interested to do this one too. Mine is @ 106K and haven't drain and fill yet. Do you guys have the procedure step by step for DIY on this?
 

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I have another question regarding to Coolant flush. I have an AWD model, do I have to remove the Bleeder plug when drain and fill the coolant? Or just remove the drain and fill only?
 

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I love hearing this. Great Job.

This was exactly me and something similar happened and it was the waiting time that put me over the edge.

I hope you came across one of my videos on YouTube (DIY Dave)
What a surprise, I also started watching your videos right after I got the MDX, thank you so much for the educational videos.
 

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My 2014 MDX SH-AWD Tech just reached 83k and dealer suggested that I replace the rear brake pads. Detroit area Acura dealer quoted me $300 for rear PADS only, and another $170 for brake fluid flush! I tried to bargain for a couple percentage discount, but they wouldn't budge. I did some research and found out that genuine Acura pads are just $45 a set (rear wheels). So I did some Youtube learning and was able to replace the rotors & pads for both Front and Rear plus brake fluid flush at around $450 for parts cost. It's actually easier than I had imagine. I have been an avid "dealer only" guy for all my maintenance and oil changes....but after that crazy quote just for rear pads, I decided to learn DIY maintenance jobs and ended up doing all of the following for my 83k MDX in a week:
1. Brake rotors & pads replacement
2. Brake fluid flush
3. Tire rotation
4. Rear differential fluid change
5. Transfer case fluid change
6. ATF transmission fluid change (3x3)
7. Engine air filter & cabin filter replacements (they normally charged me $50-$60 per filter!)
8. Power steering fluid flush
9. Engine oil & filter change

I can't believe how much we can learn from Google & Youtube nowadays. Had that dealer agreed to give me a $100 discount, I wouldn't have known how to do these basic maintenances myself. I'm a very meticulous person, so I'm really enjoy doing all these works myself and feel like I can trust myself more than Acura techs now (LOL). Anyhow, enough of my bragging. I just want to share this major accomplishment as the result of reading & learning from many helpful tips from this forum. Thank you!

P.S.
Does anybody have some tips or helpful instruction on flushing the coolant fluid? That job seems the most complicated for me at the moment. TYIA.
Way to go!!!
 

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oh the joy of learning to do it all yourself 🥰

Yes dealers are not nice, I really dont know how they even survive for that matter.
 

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My 2014 MDX SH-AWD Tech just reached 83k and dealer suggested that I replace the rear brake pads. Detroit area Acura dealer quoted me $300 for rear PADS only, and another $170 for brake fluid flush! I tried to bargain for a couple percentage discount, but they wouldn't budge. I did some research and found out that genuine Acura pads are just $45 a set (rear wheels). So I did some Youtube learning and was able to replace the rotors & pads for both Front and Rear plus brake fluid flush at around $450 for parts cost. It's actually easier than I had imagine. I have been an avid "dealer only" guy for all my maintenance and oil changes....but after that crazy quote just for rear pads, I decided to learn DIY maintenance jobs and ended up doing all of the following for my 83k MDX in a week:
1. Brake rotors & pads replacement
2. Brake fluid flush
3. Tire rotation
4. Rear differential fluid change
5. Transfer case fluid change
6. ATF transmission fluid change (3x3)
7. Engine air filter & cabin filter replacements (they normally charged me $50-$60 per filter!)
8. Engine oil & filter change

I can't believe how much we can learn from Google & Youtube nowadays. Had that dealer agreed to give me a $100 discount, I wouldn't have known how to do these basic maintenances myself. I'm a very meticulous person, so I'm really enjoy doing all these works myself and feel like I can trust myself more than Acura techs now (LOL). Anyhow, enough of my bragging. I just want to share this major accomplishment as the result of reading & learning from many helpful tips from this forum. Thank you!

P.S.
Does anybody have some tips or helpful instruction on flushing the coolant fluid? That job seems the most complicated for me at the moment. TYIA.
Nice job. When I was younger I liked to do stuff like that. I am sure the work you outlined would total well over $1,000. I still like to fool with the cars (I have 18 at last count) but I am dependent on my handy dandy 2 post lift. I like to get under them as it seems most issues are on the bottom half of the darn things.
 

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That $300 includes rear pads and resurfacing the rotors. Dealerships do not just slap pads on without resurfacing.
 

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oh the joy of learning to do it all yourself 🥰

Yes dealers are not nice, I really dont know how they even survive for that matter.
Dealers do just fine, in fact the service department is the biggest cash cow on the property. Let's face it, not everyone can or should try to turn a wrench on their own car. Independent shops run the gamut in terms of good to just plain horrible and some people are just plain incapable of figuring out which is which. The dealer offers a level of consistency much like booking a Hilton vs a no name hotel. Yes, you'll pay more. And the dealers are all reliant on good survey results for their new inventory allocation which you can't say about an independent shop.

No, I am not a pro dealer shill. Haven't been in one for other than warranty service since I bought my last new car in December 2005 and have only once paid a dealer for customer pay work which was my first Honda timing belt in 2009. That's a job I still pay to have done, but now I have a great side work guy that does it for $250 and I supply the Aisin kit. Like every other retail operation from the Dollar store all the way to a Lambo dealership they have a target customer they serve. It just doesn't happen to be many of us here because most of us work on our own cars.
 

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Dealers do just fine, in fact the service department is the biggest cash cow on the property. Let's face it, not everyone can or should try to turn a wrench on their own car. Independent shops run the gamut in terms of good to just plain horrible and some people are just plain incapable of figuring out which is which. The dealer offers a level of consistency much like booking a Hilton vs a no name hotel. Yes, you'll pay more. And the dealers are all reliant on good survey results for their new inventory allocation which you can't say about an independent shop.

No, I am not a pro dealer shill. Haven't been in one for other than warranty service since I bought my last new car in December 2005 and have only once paid a dealer for customer pay work which was my first Honda timing belt in 2009. That's a job I still pay to have done, but now I have a great side work guy that does it for $250 and I supply the Aisin kit. Like every other retail operation from the Dollar store all the way to a Lambo dealership they have a target customer they serve. It just doesn't happen to be many of us here because most of us work on our own cars.
I don’t work on my own car. I would think a lot of people on here do not work on their car.
 

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I don’t work on my own car. I would think a lot of people on here do not work on their car.
Yes, a higher percentage of members here do not as would be expected for what is considered a mid-luxury brand. As the cars age though they get picked up by 2nd or 3rd owners and those are far more hands on.
 

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I would like to work on my own cars . Just don’t have space to do it .
For now going to local shop works .
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
So, I finally had a chance to flush out the coolant in my 2014 MDX. Thanks to the instruction Neoshi sent. It wasn’t as bad as I had thought. However, it’s not as smooth as it supposed to be either. I discovered that the phillips screws holding the front bottom splash guard were all stripped. The Acura tech must have used power tools on those phillips screws on the last maintenance job. It took me awhile to finally drill those phillips out and replaced with new ones.
Then came the copper hex on the engine block where we would connect a hose to to drain coolant - the copper hex was already rounded! There was no way I could loosen it. So I had no choice but to loosen the bigger, 17mm bolt where the copper nipple attaches to. Luckily, the “form a funnel” tool that LocalBar recommended was a genius design. I was able to lead the coolant from the drain down to an actual funnel, then into the oil pan on the ground. Not a sign of coolant on my driveway at all. Overall, very clean process. But this teaches me a lesson that Acura technicians don’t give a crap about your vehicles. They use power tools and try to get the job done in the shortest time and leave any inadvertent mess for the next guy to deal with - in this case the stripped screws and copper hex.

One thing to make note is that if you ever have to remove the 17mm bolt to drain the coolant like me, the 18mm crush washer for it has a different part number (90401-P8A-A00) than the more-common 18mm crush washer used on the transmission & rear differential drains. Local Acura & Honda dealers don’t normally carry it. They have to order it in. However, I spent a good amount of time to compare & find the difference between the two 18mm washers, and can’t really tell. So, I used the common 18mm washer that I have handy and found no issue/leakage at all. One important note though: NEVER use knock-off crush washers from eBay, even if it costs $1 a piece that makes you think it’s legit! Knock-off washers are made of steel and doesn’t deform or got crushed at all by pressure from the bolt, thus cannot completely seal any gap. I had learned it the hard way....
 
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