Acura MDX SUV Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,761 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Had an opportunity to test some microfiber towels I got from Steve Paski, my local Zaino distributor. He has a wash mit, chamois, and polishing cloth available. Here's the rundown/review:

WASH MIT: Holds a decent amount of water and suds, and
is excellent for cleaning nooks and crannies, including trim
and around body-side moldings where I always seem to miss.

I think I prefer the Royal Velvets/Charismas for the big parts
(hood, roof, side panels) as an RV hand towel holds probably
2x or 3x as much water and suds. Keep in mind, though,
that I've never been a huge fan of any washmit and on the MDX
you actually need to be able to swing the towel by its end to
reach the middle of the roof :)

Like I said, the mit was far superior for the nooks/crannies/trim
areas. No mircomarring.

MF CHAMOIS: I use the "full open nozzle" method to sheet
water off the car. Typically, 1 bath size or bath sheet RV
is adequate to dry the whole thing.

I used 2 chamois and needed to grab a hand towel to finish
up. Might've preferred them to be a little bigger.

One thing that was nice about the chamois is that it does a
better job of getting the non-etched, not-too-old water spots
off the paint. You know, the ones that you inevitably get right
after the wash, and rely on some hard(er) pressure w/the RV
or some z6 to eliminate. The chamois takes them off in 1
pass with no additional pressure.

I think my strategy will be to sheet the water, use a RV bath
towel for a prelim dry, then the chamois for the "final" dry.

Also used the chamois to remove z5 and some 3M paste glaze
(review forthcoming). Leaves no residue and is a "one-swipe"
deal. Will continue to use the MF chamois for zaino/wax removal.

DETAIL MF: Good size. Only did a z6 with it. Easy to use,
easier to handle than a RV hand towel, didn't soak like the RV
tends to do, and therefore no folding required. No micromarring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,761 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
m2pc said:
What is mico-marring?
Basically, light scratches (most noticable on darker colors) that ya put there yourself w/a towel, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
go ahead -
ask him to explain the difference between micro-marring and spider-webbing ;)

good input on the towels . . .

ive finally taken the plunge and am a day or two away from stocking and selling M/F towels finally. took a lot of work to find great quality at very good orices - and consistent supplies plus previous customer reviews led me to a vendor . .

microfibre can be very time consuming to research . . . sheeesh

im glad they will save me detailing time . .. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
mc0818 said:
Any hopes of getting a Group buy going for the towels?
You can get them most any place and I'm told by the Meguiars rep. that they're all basically the same except for the size and thickness - none will damage the finish.

One thing though is to be careful they are CLEAN when you use them. They do a wonderful job in trapping the dirt but make sure you've got a clean one if you're doing the final polishing. Recommended that you wash them separately as they will pick up lint and stuff from other towels.

Costco has some "High Performance Microfiber Towels" by Microfiber Unlimited, Inc. - 10 towels (in Easter pastel colors) 14x16 inch were about $12. I bought a zillion packs and have done more house cleaning in the past 3 weeks than I've done in a long while - they work great!! And are great for getting the haze off glass - work well even dry.

Happy polishing!!

Barb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
beep beep - back up the MDX . . . .;)

the meguairs rep who told you they were all basically the same was greatly misinforming you !
there are serious differences in the market place on microfibre.

i'll stick a little cut and paste a friend of mine slapped together - a compilation of facts published in various sites . . . it summarizes longer articles well..

its one reason i took a year to find a vendor to sell me items for resale - quality issues in a lot of cases, inconsistent goods, etc . .
----------------------------------------------------

There are 2 processes needed for making a microfibre cloth.

The First is to make raw microfiber thread. This is the relatively cheap and easy part.
Typical microfibre is 80% polyester and 20% polyamide (high end stuff is 70/30). It's intended to be super-fine, with a standard denier of < 0.2. The "good stuff" is about 0.13 denier. Denier is a measurement based on the mass of 9000 meters of thread. 1 denier means 9,000 meters has a mass of 1 gram. The smaller the denier, the finer the threads.
To put it into comparison, extemely fine silk has a denier of about 1.25. This makes quality microfibre about 10 times finer than silk. Smooth and Soft!

Cheap Factory Trick #1: There's no real laws set on how fine microfiber has to be. A blend with a 0.9 denier is still "microfiber". A cheaper cloth is likely to be coarser. Granted, it's still finer than silk.

2nd part of making a cloth. Process it into a cloth.
Now, the neat thing about microfibre is that it's superfine, and thus can be super-tightly woven. If you weave microfibre thread into a towel, it forms a barrier that is practically waterproof! For a car... this is worthless. You probably bought a microfiber cloth to lift wax or remove water. A water resistant cloth is just going to smear stuff around.
The expensive part is what the industry just calls "splitting". Individual threads are split out and exposed like hooks so that they can absorb water and grab dirt and wax. A split microfiber cloth will happily suck up to 7 times it's mass in water, or burnish 5 cars before it needs washing.

Cheap Factory Trick #2: Don't split the fabric. No laws that say you NEED to. If you bought a cheap towel, you are running 80%+ odds that it's NOT split.


A good 80/20 cloth generally costs about $5-8 USD each ($15-$20 US for a 3-pack). The 70/30 blend "Magic/Miracle Towels" cost about $15 US for just one.
There is a huge difference between a cheap microfiber and a good one. If in doubt, stick to cotton
-------------------------------------------------------------
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
So why, given the "common knowledge" that even a speck of polyester in a bath towel will absolutely destroy your paint, will polyester in a microfiber towel NOT scratch? People have warned on every car forum I have visited that polyester is a terrible thing.

If the answer is that the fiber is smaller, I'm not quite a believer, because a smaller fiber could cause smaller scratches, as long as it's bigger than the molecules in paint, and I'm sure that's the case.

To be honest, I've have never believed, and have said before, that a polyester bath towel won't put scratches in car paint. That's from experience, not from reading the several websites that warn to ONLY use PURE cotton towels (and watch for edge threads in towels claimed to be 100% cotton, etc.) So I DO believe that the microfiber towels won't by themselves scratch. I think under magnification, polyester actually looks like a fiber less likely to scratch than cotton, although there would be more to it than just looks.

But one comment I do have on microfiber towels, if they are anything close to microfiber jackets and other clothing in texture (in other words, smooth), is that it seems like they could easily trap atmospheric fallout dust/dirt (or dirt missed in washing, or picked up from a wheel well or whatever) between the towel and the clean paint and end up scratching. With a terry cloth towel, the same dirt would end up between the fibers due to the texture of the towel. Any truth to this? (I did read the last post regarding splitting of the microfiber, but it still seems like the texture is going to be much smoother than terry cloth. If it isn't, why not just use terry cloth? It's cheap and effective.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,761 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Dale MDX said:
But one comment I do have on microfiber towels, if they are anything close to microfiber jackets and other clothing in texture (in other words, smooth), is that it seems like they could easily trap atmospheric fallout dust/dirt (or dirt missed in washing, or picked up from a wheel well or whatever) between the towel and the clean paint and end up scratching. With a terry cloth towel, the same dirt would end up between the fibers due to the texture of the towel. Any truth to this?
I think that's a valid concern. You're talking about the "nap", or lack thereof, to trap the dirt AWAY from the paint finish. The MF washmit I used had a pretty deep nap, although the chamois was more of a "waffle weave" and the detailing cloth was much like MF clothing (smooth).

The presumption, of course, is that when you're drying or polishing, the car has already been washed so there shouldn't be any dirt on there that needs to be pulled away. As long as the fibers are soft and non-abrasive, you won't scratch the paint.

Re: the Meg's guy saying they're all the same. Homer's right. Not true based on some pretty extensive testing that's gone on at Autopia.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Homer2 said:
the meguairs rep who told you they were all basically the same was greatly misinforming you ! there are serious differences in the market place on microfibre.

There is a huge difference between a cheap microfiber and a good one. If in doubt, stick to cotton.
Thanks for the information - yes, I've only used cotton so far on my vehicle finishes as I wasn't totally convinced that ANY polyester fabric was less harmful than cotton. My concern was why I asked the microfiber quality question of the Meguiars rep during a MB club detailing clinic.

I'll stick with the cotton for now but have asked the dernier and fabric thread splitting question of the Microfiber Unlimited folks and will post info once I receive it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
I won't use a MF towel for washing

No matter how deep the nap is I've noticed that much of the dirt sticks to the top of the towel and it is also very difficult to rinse the dirt out of the MF towel.

My personal preference is to use a very deep nap cotton chenille mit or pad. Even then I rinse the mit with clean water after every swipe on the car. I used to do the two bucket routine but now I just use the hose to rinse the mit between every wipe.

Here's a link to the MF towels I use.

Two Big Grey towels will completely dry the X and I use the glass towel on glass with Stoner glass cleaner.

http://www.microfibertech.com/towels.html

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
Homer2 said:
go ahead -

ive finally taken the plunge and am a day or two away from stocking and selling M/F towels finally. took a lot of work to find great quality at very good orices - and consistent supplies plus previous customer reviews led me to a vendor . .

microfibre can be very time consuming to research . . . sheeesh

im glad they will save me detailing time . .. :cool:
HI Homer, BTW, thanks for the Zaino tips e-mail you sent me.

Glad to hear your stocking MF towels. I had bought some before you announced. But here are my thought :rolleyes:

The MF for buffing is great! Easy to remove the Zaino as well as general buffing and NO lint!. As for washing....I am having second thoughts about using the MF mits again. It seems very difficult to get particles out of the mit. So are you selling MF towels now? Whats your product line that you are carrying? Inquiring minds want to know :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Microfiber towels are made up of Polyester and polyamide. This fiber has less diameter than the silk strand. These are tightly woven and has high absorbency. They used to wash cars with detergent or car soaps. After the wash, we couldn't leave the car as it as to dry. It causes spots on it. These high absorbency microfiber towels remove the spots without making lint and scratches.

High Absorbency, Lint-free, scratches free, long-lasting, these features making microfiber towels ideal for car wash and detailing services.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,239 Posts
I've gone 100% micro fiber for washing, drying, and interior cleanings. I also did ceramic coating, use ceramic boosting soaps, and foam gun to hand wash. I like to wash at home because I have a water softener that helps with spots. I also did Ceramic Pro on interior surfaces to see how that works compared to oil based conditioners that leave hazy windows and dusty interiors. So far, micro fiber wipe downs with same ceramic soaps are keeping dust and hazy interior windows at a minimal.

I wash all micro fiber drying towels, detail cloths, and wash mitts every few weeks in cold water with a tide pod only and air dry. Heat drying in the dryer can melt the micro fibers. I sometimes put them in the dryer with no heat to fluff them up and remove any lint that might be on them.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top