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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have Cross Terrains on my 2006 MDX. The car now has about 93,000 miles on it. This is the second set on the car, and have about 40,000 miles on them. For the past 8,000 miles or so, I have been trying to get these balanced and have been unsuccessful. There is vibration, I believe, from at least two of the tires starting at about 70 mph and getting worse as my speed increases. It looks like they are out of round. The tires have around 6/32nds tread left. The most recent Michelin tire dealer I talked with recommended I get a new set all around and did not address any warranty for the existing tires. He inspected the tires and did not find anything wrong. They are not allowed to drive a car above speed limit.
These tires are speed rated way above 70mph. Should I expect to have vibration like this on these tires?
Thanks for any opinions.
 

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My 2004 MDX was similar to yours. When I bought it with 113K miles in January 2011, it came with Michelin Cross Terrains, not the original set (since they were manufactured in 2007), and all had 6/32" of tread depth on them at the time.

I like to drive my tires down to 2/32", even though that means significantly degraded traction on wet pavement and even worse in snow (which is why the Tire Rack recommends replacement at 4/32"). However, every one of these tires developed a vibration by the time it got down to around 3.5/32", and it could not be cured by balancing. (The balancing machine said that it could not be balanced.) I just replaced them, one by one, without worrying about the warranty. I suspect this is just a characteristic of this particular tire.

As far as any compensation from the warranty, you would have to talk to your local Michelin dealer or their national customer service line. Either way, you would probably need to start with your local Michelin dealer, just to satisfy them that it's not a balancing issue. However, as for the likelihood they would give you anything under the warranty, their workmanship and materials warranty says they would pro-rate a replacement, within the first six years of purchase. So if you convinced them there is something wrong with the tires, you might be able to get around one third of your money back, assuming you were the original purchaser and still have your receipt. It's also possible they might only give you that credit if you buy another set of the same tire, which is impossible since they've been discontinued. Or, they might give you a credit on another Michelin tire they sell. Hard to tell unless you ask them about it. And, as you've already found, if you can't convince them there's something wrong with the tires, you won't get anything, which is apparently the position you've found yourself in. That's just an inherent problem with any warranty situation; sometimes it comes down to your opinion against theirs.

As for my personal opinion, since they're already down to 6/32" of tread, they really don't owe you anything, and I think you're being petty worrying about compensation for a tire that you've already gotten plenty of use out of. Just my opinion. After experiencing those same balancing problems, I was just happy to get rid of the Cross Terrains and move on to another make/model of tire. There are plenty of good tires out there on the market, and some of the best - such as the Bridgestone Dueler H/L 422 Ecopia ($145/tire after rebate at the Tire Rack) and the Continental CrossContact LX20 ($135) - are much less expensive than comparable Michelins. So my advice is to just cut your losses, get rid of the vibration-prone Cross Terrains, and get one of these other, superior tires. Move on, and don't agonize over trying to get something back on your worn tires.
 

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Have you tried road-force balancing or just regular balancing? If you're not familiar with road-force balancing, it uses a special machine and costs more, but it can often fix problems that regular balancing doesn't fix. See http://www.gsp9700.com/search/findgsp9700.cfm to find someone near you who does this.

Also, keep in mind that vibration can be from a problem other than the tires. Rotating your tires and seeing if the vibration changes position can help you determine this.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Nsxtasy for your quick and detailed answer. I have been looking around at a number of tires. There was a Land Rover in the parking lot yesterday that had a set of the Ecopia's on, and they looked pretty nice. I am hoping to get a good set of new tires, so want to be sure to review the best. Thanks again for your input.
 

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Have you tried road-force balancing or just regular balancing? If you're not familiar with road-force balancing, it uses a special machine and costs more, but it can often fix problems that regular balancing doesn't fix. See http://www.gsp9700.com/search/findgsp9700.cfm to find someone near you who does this.

Also, keep in mind that vibration can be from a problem other than the tires. Rotating your tires and seeing if the vibration changes position can help you determine this.
Mine had the exact same symptoms and was definitely the tires. (Of course, there's no guarantee that his problem is the same as mine, but still.) Each time I experienced vibrations, I isolated which tire it was, replaced it as a test with one of my winter tires (the vibration went away when I did so), and took the bad tire to the shop where they used a Hunter GSP9700 road-force balancing machine only to find that the machine said the tire could not be balanced. I then had them replace the tire with another tire (I bought some almost-new Bridgestone Dueler Alenza tires), after which the vibration was gone, until it started happening with another one of the Cross Terrains still on the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Lion9mdx: The Michelin tire dealer I took the tires to did have a new Hunter 9700. I am not sure if he used it when he balanced my tires. I had rotated the tires at home the day before and it did make a big difference. The shake in my steering wheel changed to a vibration in the seat. I'm just wondering if this is a common occurrence. Best regards
 

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The shake in my steering wheel changed to a vibration in the seat.
Then chances are, the vibration is in one of the tires that you moved from the front to the rear. As noted above, in my experience, it doesn't happen to all of them at the exact same time. So if you wanted to (a) replace them one at a time, changing out only the tire causing the vibration (as I did), or (b) live with the vibration in the rear where it is less notable, those are options for you, in addition to the option of replacing all four tires.

I'm just wondering if this is a common occurrence.
As I've testified, you're not the only one. :)
 

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Do you know if, as part of the roadforce balancing, that they tried rotating the tire on the rim by either 180 or 90 degrees? Many times an out of round situation can be remedied or improved by moving the tire on the rim and then rebalancing. This is what an experienced tire tech will do, even without a roadforce balancer.

Andy
 

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Do you know if, as part of the roadforce balancing, that they tried rotating the tire on the rim by either 180 or 90 degrees? Many times an out of round situation can be remedied or improved by moving the tire on the rim and then rebalancing. This is what an experienced tire tech will do, even without a roadforce balancer.
I don't know the answer to what was done with mine, and I don't disagree with what you're saying. However, that's probably only worth doing for a tire that's still got a lot of tread depth left. Once the tire is already quite worn (and I'd say that about a tire with 6/32" or less of tread depth), it's probably not worth spending the time or money trying to get additional life out of it by dismounting/remounting/rebalancing and hoping that cures the vibration. For one thing, there isn't all that much life left on a tire that's pretty worn, and for another, that part of the tire's life has the worst performance, due to poor traction particularly on wet pavement or in snow when the tread depth is shallow. (Similarly, it's probably not worth spending the time or money to repair a puncture on a tire that's already quite worn.)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Do you know if, as part of the roadforce balancing, that they tried rotating the tire on the rim by either 180 or 90 degrees? Many times an out of round situation can be remedied or improved by moving the tire on the rim and then rebalancing. This is what an experienced tire tech will do, even without a roadforce balancer.

Andy
Andysinnh:
Not sure if they rotated the tires on the rims. They didn't say they did. Judging from the amount of time they took, I would say no. It doesn't seem to be any better as far as the amount of vibration though. The most improvement I got was moving the tire from the front to the back. Probably a result of not feeling it in the steering wheel anymore. While it would make sense to rotate a tire on the rim when first purchased, I wonder if it would help with a tire that develops a vibration over time?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Nsxtasy:
Do you have any experience with other tire brands developing a vibration when they accumulate wear? Thanks for any info.
 

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I don't know the answer to what was done with mine, and I don't disagree with what you're saying. However, that's probably only worth doing for a tire that's still got a lot of tread depth left. Once the tire is already quite worn (and I'd say that about a tire with 6/32" or less of tread depth), it's probably not worth spending the time or money trying to get additional life out of it by dismounting/remounting/rebalancing and hoping that cures the vibration. For one thing, there isn't all that much life left on a tire that's pretty worn, and for another, that part of the tire's life has the worst performance, due to poor traction particularly on wet pavement or in snow when the tread depth is shallow. (Similarly, it's probably not worth spending the time or money to repair a puncture on a tire that's already quite worn.)
I don't disagree. But everyone has a different tipping point of when tire wear crosses the "buy new tires" threshold. My tire place charges the same whether they have to reposition a tire or not. It's part of their normal balancing service. So even when half worn it might make sense to at least give it a shot.

Andy
 

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Andysinnh:
Not sure if they rotated the tires on the rims. They didn't say they did. Judging from the amount of time they took, I would say no. It doesn't seem to be any better as far as the amount of vibration though. The most improvement I got was moving the tire from the front to the back. Probably a result of not feeling it in the steering wheel anymore. While it would make sense to rotate a tire on the rim when first purchased, I wonder if it would help with a tire that develops a vibration over time?
My local shop does this level of work on a tire when they install it brand new to ensure the best spin and road force reading. And they also offer free lifetime rotations every 5k miles, which they include rebalancing the tires they move to the front, including repositioning if needed. To me, this level of service is the norm, and I never have to go back with a problem. They also do lifetime flat repair with full rebalancing.

Andy
 

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While it would make sense to rotate a tire on the rim when first purchased, I wonder if it would help with a tire that develops a vibration over time?
It may, or it may not; you would need to try it. And, as noted above, it may not be worth worrying about if the tire doesn't have all that much life/tread remaining on it. (Also, given my experience, with all of my Cross Terrains experiencing vibrations when worn, I doubt that all of them just happened to be mounted on the wheels in exactly the worst position for balancing.)

If you like, you could give this a try and see if it helps. Whether you try this, or decide to replace the tire that's causing the problem, either way your first step would be to continue to move the tires around the car until you can isolate the (presumably) one tire that's causing the problem. (You already know it's a tire that you just moved from the front to the rear, but in saying that I'm guessing you did that with two of the tires, so you still need to identify which of those two is the problem tire.)

Nsxtasy:
Do you have any experience with other tire brands developing a vibration when they accumulate wear?
No. These are the only tires I've ever had this happen with, in my decades of driving various cars. However, as with many tire characteristics, what's important is not just the make, but the model. What I mean by that is, while I suspect the vibration problems when worn is a common characteristic of the Michelin Cross Terrain, I would not automatically assume this to be true of other Michelin tires. OTOH, as already noted, Michelin tires are frequently more expensive than comparable tires from other manufacturers, so that's an additional reason to consider other brands.
 

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My 2002 MDX has 176,000 miles, and a severe front end vibration only at low (25-30) speed mph. I recently installed new Yokohamas and still have the problem. The dealer says its the front axle (?) but Im not sure its the transaxle, or drive shaft, etc..

Could it be the new Yokos are out of round?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Tlynch:
It doesn't seem like that would be the case. If your tires are so out of round that they have a severe vibration at low speed, the vibration would probably still be there at higher speeds. But, you can always find a Hunter machine and have them checked.
 

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Vibration at slow speeds

My issue is at low speeds (10-15 mph approx) and with uneven road conditions. It's only for a few seconds, then it stops.

I have Cross Terrains on my 2006 MDX. The car now has about 93,000 miles on it. This is the second set on the car, and have about 40,000 miles on them. For the past 8,000 miles or so, I have been trying to get these balanced and have been unsuccessful. There is vibration, I believe, from at least two of the tires starting at about 70 mph and getting worse as my speed increases. It looks like they are out of round. The tires have around 6/32nds tread left. The most recent Michelin tire dealer I talked with recommended I get a new set all around and did not address any warranty for the existing tires. He inspected the tires and did not find anything wrong. They are not allowed to drive a car above speed limit.
These tires are speed rated way above 70mph. Should I expect to have vibration like this on these tires?
Thanks for any opinions.
 

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Same Problem With Michelins

Had same problem with Michelins on my 2007 MDX. Could not get them balanced. Have 2014 MDX and the tires are Continental (German Company). Had choice between Cont. or Miche. Chose to try the Cont. For one thing the replacement value will be less. I'll post results when mileage gets on up.
 

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After reading your issue, it all makes sense now. I've had vibration issues all the time with 2 sets of CT's and was always having the shop rebalance and rotate to no avail. I now have the new Latitudes and problems gone. I completely forgot about the vibrations until reading this. It makes sense to me now that there were probably issues with the CT's and not just in my head all these years...... Next time I'm at the shop, I'll let them know about this and we'll have a good laugh since I was driving them crazy with the vibration issue. By the way, I bought the Latitudes last summer, and not the CT's since I read that the CT's were going to be discontinued. I didn't want to be stuck getting a different tire if I had a flat or warranty issue. This way the new Latitudes will be around for awhile.
 
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