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Discussion Starter #1
Those who have advanced package. Can you please review these features? I'm really interested if you find them useful.
Would they stand up to the test of rush hour traffic?

Thanks!
 

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I have Advance 2014 (1-week old) and and using LKAS + AAC. Drove 350 miles with two 100 miles trips.

First, I don't think LKAS + AAC is good for rush hour traffic, but they are GREAT for highway.

LKAS is a very interesting feature that I didn't expect. (AAC is pretty well known) LKAS is keeping the vehicle in the middle of the lane by slightly rotating the steering wheel. It feels like someone is rotating the wheel :) Very funny. It dramatically minimizes effort in steering on highway. But, LKAS isn't for autonomous driving. Your hand (at least one) must be on the steering wheel. Otherwise, there will be a warning. LKAS will be easily disengaged/overridden when you give a force to the steering wheel. So, no resistance when you want to change the lane. Of course, LKAS is working so long as the car can detect the lanes. It doesn't work on heavily curved lanes. There are a number of technical limitations in the system. See the owner manual.

http://techinfo.honda.com/rjanisis/pubs/OM/Z51414/Z51414OM.pdf

ACC + Low speed follow does work. But, it doesn't well give the feeling of safety. Sometimes the braking is abrupt. I'm not ready providing full impressions for this feature. Need to use more a couple of weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have Advance 2014 (1-week old) and and using LKAS + AAC. Drove 350 miles with two 100 miles trips.

First, I don't think LKAS + AAC is good for rush hour traffic, but they are GREAT for highway.

LKAS is a very interesting feature that I didn't expect. (AAC is pretty well known) LKAS is keeping the vehicle in the middle of the lane by slightly rotating the steering wheel. It feels like someone is rotating the wheel :) Very funny. It dramatically minimizes effort in steering on highway. But, LKAS isn't for autonomous driving. Your hand (at least one) must be on the steering wheel. Otherwise, there will be a warning. LKAS will be easily disengaged/overridden when you give a force to the steering wheel. So, no any resistance when you want to change the lane. Of course, LKAS is working so long as the car can detect the lanes. There are a number of technical limitations in the system. See the owner manual.

http://techinfo.honda.com/rjanisis/pubs/OM/Z51414/Z51414OM.pdf

ACC + Low speed follow does work. But, it doesn't well give the feeling of safety. Sometimes the braking is abrupt. I only used once in 35 mpg in a city traffic. But, I'd rather just drive by myself. However, AAC is great for highway as well with LKAS.
thanks

gotta love this new tech :)
although the tech package doesn't have it. haha
 

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Yes.. that's the biggest down in 2014 MDX. They are selling a stupid ENT system (cost of almost $2500) in Advance package. The same rip off can be found in JX35.

Yes.. it does work like the video. I tested a couple of times in 35-mph city traffic and 75-mpg high traffic. But, it could be dangerous if a car abruptly is approaching from the other lane. But, of course, ACC is much better then a normal cruise control.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
oh btw congratulations on your new MDX. I can't wait to test drive one. :)
 

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Like barcarole I have used these extensively on a couple of long trips throughout the mountains here in Colorado, one 2-lane mountain highways and on I-70. I love both features when I am on a modestly curving interstate with moderate to little traffic and traffic that is moving at a similar speed (within 10 MPH or so of what you want to do.) That was not very well said. Let me see if I can break it down.

When I love ACC
- Interstate where I set CC at the speed limit +5 and the traffic is not heavy or aggressive. I did this a lot this week and it was very nice. You don't need to leave it on all the time. If traffic gets a bit tight or twitchy then Cancel it for a minute or so and re-enable when things loosen up a bit. That's enough to give the legs a break. I find this much more useful than standard cruise control.
- 2-lane highways with modest to low traffic. I used it a lot for this scenario this week and found it quite useful. One interesting example was when I was following a car on one of these highways using ACC and we came upon one of those small towns where the speed drops down to 35. The car in front of me adjusted gradually down to 35 and so my MDX did as well. Of course I never would have gone through that little town over the speed limit. ;-) (There was a copy sitting a block inside the town just waiting.)

When I would avoid ACC
- When you want to drive aggressively ;-) Seriously, if you want to follow closely behind the car in front of you or do a lot of lane changing you won't be using this.
- Large differences in traffic speeds. This won't be a problem for the technology but if you are comfortably flying down the interstate at 70 and come upon a motorhome struggling uphill at 55 the ACC is may apply the brakes more aggressively than you would have. Of course, if you change lanes so that slow motor home is not in front of you then you will be fine.
- Mountain interstates or highways with lots of curves. You really want to be in control at this point. In fact, cruise control in general is not always good when you are going up and down steep grades, trying to move around slow trucks in the right lane, etc.

When I like LKAS (notice I said "like", not "love")
- Relatively straight, well-lined highways or freeways when I want to give the hands/arms a break. To me that is probably the biggest benefit. On long road trips I can hold the steering wheel it bit lighter and more relaxed because LKAS will "help" me around the turn.

When I would not use LKAS
- Curvy mountain roads. (If there is little to no other traffic I like to cut corners which would drive LKAS crazy.)
- Poorly lined roads (it needs well marked lines)

Other comments on ACC
- I very much like the information displayed in the MID. This is the first cruise control where I can see the MPH that I have set. I also like the display indicating more or less "distance" to be maintained from the car in front.
- With respect to that last one, I do find myself adjusting the distance between myself and the car in front. (Easy to do by repeatedly pushing the ACC button.) I find that the max distance makes the ACC a little more aggressive in slowing you down and leaves enough distance that a semi truck could try to squeeze in. That would be useless in CA where bumper riding at 70 seems common.

Hope that helps. I have some very long road trips coming up in August/September. I will make heavy use of both these features to reduce the stress and fatigue on my hands/arms (LKAS) and especially on my right leg (ACC).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Like barcarole I have used these extensively on a couple of long trips throughout the mountains here in Colorado, one 2-lane mountain highways and on I-70. I love both features when I am on a modestly curving interstate with moderate to little traffic and traffic that is moving at a similar speed (within 10 MPH or so of what you want to do.) That was not very well said. Let me see if I can break it down.

When I love ACC
- Interstate where I set CC at the speed limit +5 and the traffic is not heavy or aggressive. I did this a lot this week and it was very nice. You don't need to leave it on all the time. If traffic gets a bit tight or twitchy then Cancel it for a minute or so and re-enable when things loosen up a bit. That's enough to give the legs a break. I find this much more useful than standard cruise control.
- 2-lane highways with modest to low traffic. I used it a lot for this scenario this week and found it quite useful. One interesting example was when I was following a car on one of these highways using ACC and we came upon one of those small towns where the speed drops down to 35. The car in front of me adjusted gradually down to 35 and so my MDX did as well. Of course I never would have gone through that little town over the speed limit. ;-) (There was a copy sitting a block inside the town just waiting.)

When I would avoid ACC
- When you want to drive aggressively ;-) Seriously, if you want to follow closely behind the car in front of you or do a lot of lane changing you won't be using this.
- Large differences in traffic speeds. This won't be a problem for the technology but if you are comfortably flying down the interstate at 70 and come upon a motorhome struggling uphill at 55 the ACC is may apply the brakes more aggressively than you would have. Of course, if you change lanes so that slow motor home is not in front of you then you will be fine.
- Mountain interstates or highways with lots of curves. You really want to be in control at this point. In fact, cruise control in general is not always good when you are going up and down steep grades, trying to move around slow trucks in the right lane, etc.

When I like LKAS (notice I said "like", not "love")
- Relatively straight, well-lined highways or freeways when I want to give the hands/arms a break. To me that is probably the biggest benefit. On long road trips I can hold the steering wheel it bit lighter and more relaxed because LKAS will "help" me around the turn.

When I would not use LKAS
- Curvy mountain roads. (If there is little to no other traffic I like to cut corners which would drive LKAS crazy.)
- Poorly lined roads (it needs well marked lines)

Other comments on ACC
- I very much like the information displayed in the MID. This is the first cruise control where I can see the MPH that I have set. I also like the display indicating more or less "distance" to be maintained from the car in front.
- With respect to that last one, I do find myself adjusting the distance between myself and the car in front. (Easy to do by repeatedly pushing the ACC button.) I find that the max distance makes the ACC a little more aggressive in slowing you down and leaves enough distance that a semi truck could try to squeeze in. That would be useless in CA where bumper riding at 70 seems common.

Hope that helps. I have some very long road trips coming up in August/September. I will make heavy use of both these features to reduce the stress and fatigue on my hands/arms (LKAS) and especially on my right leg (ACC).
thank you.
 
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