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Purchased on 4/24...nice car. Installed a receiver hitch this afternoon for carrying a bike rack. New wipers and cabin filter...easy stuff. What else do I need to look for on this car? When do spark plugs need to be replaced? Does it have coil packs? Diff fluids? 34k miles...
 

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Sparks are due at 105k miles alongside the timing belt and water pump but you will get a code for it in the MID. Just check the service records if the brake fluid has been changed since Honda recommends every 3 years (Honda owns Acura lol).

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Acura is owned by Honda??? I better slap my grandma! lol

What about differential, transfer case and transmission fluids?
 

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At 34k miles, I'd change the rear diff fluid in case it's not been done. Normal maint is first change at 15K miles, then 30k increments thereafter. Tranny fluid on the 9 speed isn't due till like 60k, and you'd normally do the transfer case at the same time. Only other thing is after 3 years Honda recommends replacing the brake fluid as a normal matter of course. Only other thing are the air and cabin filters at least at this point in its life.

andy
 

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I would also check the spare to make sure the PSI is set to 60. I usually add road hazard warranty from Discount Tires that includes rotation/balance if your tires are new-ish. That will save you some $$$ compared to what the dealership charges for just one rotation/balance. I also upgraded to a full size spare since my MDX is my main travel vehicle. Some aftermarket hitches can't take a full size spare like the OEM hitch.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Checked the spare when I installed the receiver hitch…was at 30psi.


Thanks everyone for your help!!!
 

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^^^ Good list, PDXsailor!

Had my MDX at the dealer yesterday for them to check several things. They recommended to do transmission, rear differential and transfer case service. Also replace the PCV Valve. Had them take care of it. They also checked the AC, fixed the sliding door on the center console and a few other warranty items.
 

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^^^ Good list, PDXsailor!

Had my MDX at the dealer yesterday for them to check several things. They recommended to do transmission, rear differential and transfer case service. Also replace the PCV Valve. Had them take care of it. They also checked the AC, fixed the sliding door on the center console and a few other warranty items.
PCV valve? You 100% sure it needed to be replaced? At that low mileage... sounds like they tryna rip you off unless its really bad.

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Is this really any different than filling them with nitrogen? I think that is equally amusing...
Say what you want about nitrogen not being any different or a rip off, but living in a northern climate with wide temperature fluctuations, I've had it ever since it was included when I bought my Infiniti going on on 13 years ago, and it is different than using air from a compressor. Besides typical pressure changes as u drive the cold pressure is very consistent and I never need to top them off or anything.

There is obviously the subjective argument around whether it's worth it to an individual or not, so I won't argue that, but I will argue with the result. It is night and day difference if you have wide seasonal temperatures fluctuations. Even @ -20F, I don't see tires losing pressure to the point its low requiring a top off ever. When I didn't have it I always had low pressure when it got cold and required top off a few times a year.

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If you are "living in a northern climate with wide temperature fluctuations" then nitrogen is even more pointless - because you must continually add or remove gas as the temperature changes, and doing so with nitrogen is a nuisance that is unnecessary. You are going to have to check and adjust pressures either way, but I use a 12VDC electric air pump and you chase down nitrogen (or otherwise you are defeating the purpose). Both permeate through the rubber, the pure nitrogen slightly slower, and both change pressure with temperature. In extreme applications it makes some sense, but not for your daily driver. See this article for a debunking: Should You Use Nitrogen in Your Car Tires? I appreciate that once you buy into something like this it seems like it must be better (confirmation bias) but it isn't. Really.
 

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Say what you want about nitrogen not being any different or a rip off, but living in a northern climate with wide temperature fluctuations, I've had it ever since it was included when I bought my Infiniti going on on 13 years ago, and it is different than using air from a compressor. Besides typical pressure changes as u drive the cold pressure is very consistent and I never need to top them off or anything.

There is obviously the subjective argument around whether it's worth it to an individual or not, so I won't argue that, but I will argue with the result. It is night and day difference if you have wide seasonal temperatures fluctuations. Even @ -20F, I don't see tires losing pressure to the point its low requiring a top off ever. When I didn't have it I always had low pressure when it got cold and required top off a few times a year.

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Say what you want about nitrogen not being any different or a rip off, but living in a northern climate with wide temperature fluctuations, I've had it ever since it was included when I bought my Infiniti going on on 13 years ago, and it is different than using air from a compressor. Besides typical pressure changes as u drive the cold pressure is very consistent and I never need to top them off or anything.

There is obviously the subjective argument around whether it's worth it to an individual or not, so I won't argue that, but I will argue with the result. It is night and day difference if you have wide seasonal temperatures fluctuations. Even @ -20F, I don't see tires losing pressure to the point its low requiring a top off ever. When I didn't have it I always had low pressure when it got cold and required top off a few times a year.

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all gases observe boyle's law relating pressure to temperature. For the temperatures and pressures observed in tires, gases can be treated as ideal gas. The reason nitrogen filled tires are often more stable for pressure over temperature has almost nothing to do with nitrogen, it has to do that there is NO WATER, either as a liquid or vapor in the air going into the tire. A side effect of generating a nitrogen source. A tire filled with DRY 80% nitrogen/20% oxygen will exibit virtually the same pressure change over temperature. Another slight advantage of Nitrogen is that even though it's atomic weight is less than oxygen (14 vs 16), it is a larger molecule which means it will not leak through the tire as quickly as oxygen does. Less pressure loss over time, but that difference is pretty minor.

Normal air compressors generally have a lot of water in the tank as a result of water vapor in the air, and the tank is often warm, which means the RH of the air going into the tire is high, lots of water vapor to expand as temps go up and condense and not contribute to pressure as temps go down. And many stations don't do a good job of draining the water out of the tanks either. Compound that with an environment that has a high relative humidity, and the problem gets compounded.

So, yes, there are conditions where a dry air fill, nitrogen being one of the cheapest and easiest to come by, will result in less pressure change over temperature.

What you are likely experiencing is water vapor condensing at low temperature significantly reducing tire pressure, especially as temps go below freezing. As the tire warms up and some of the water vaporizes, it behaves like any other gas and increases tire pressure. It takes very little water vapor to effect the pressure. And the water vapor is not a constant gas volume, it can vary considerably with temperature.

So.... fill up with a source that has minimal water vapor. That's the trick. If it's a nitrogen source that works. If it is a dry air source, works as well.
 

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Nitrogen molecules are also larger so they don't permeate through the sidewall of the tires. That and the moisture are the 2 main reasons. Even if "regular air" is 70% nitrogen and nitrogen is 90%, that's still 20% less of the molecules that are small enough to permeate through the tire itself, which lends credence to more stable pressure.

Again I'm not arguing whether it's worth it to you or others, that's subjective. I already have nitrogen in my tires and I'm just commenting on my observations

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