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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, just got a 2005 MDX 2 weeks ago, it has 160k. I did a tire rotation today and noticed this CV Boot leaking. The grease seems to be getting thrown everywhere. I haven't heard a noise at highway speeds. I am good with oil changes and spark plugs, etc, but have never changed out a CV axle. My question is, how urgent is this? Do I need to drop everything and fix this or can I replace this in the next few months?

Any input is appreciated.
 

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I've experienced torn CV boots with an older accord, so I assume it's not too different for MDX. When there was no longer enough grease left in the CV joint, it still ran for a while but there was noticeable clicking/clunking sound when the car was moving. I assume the noise will get worse over time as the CV joint wears out due to insufficient lubrication, and eventually malfunction. I'm not sure if it's possible for the joint to break apart. I'm no expert but I assume if it gets really bad it could affect your steering, and potentially dangerous. But I suppose most people notice this problem only when they start hearing the clicking sounds, so that is usually the time it gets fixed, so I assume it is usually safe to drive up to that point.

Some people try to save money and just re-grease the joint and replace the boots, which could get very messy if not used to the task. I have my doubts with just re-greasing and replacing the boots unless you know for sure the CV joint has not been compromised already. When I had the problem with my accord, I just replaced the half-shaft assembly. But that required more work as it involved removing it from the wheel hub, which required a special hub nut socket (I was able to borrow one from oreilly auto parts store). I also had to maneuver around the suspension. The other end had to be disconnected from the transaxle, which meant refilling the tranny oil afterwards. I'm sure it will be at least that much work on the MDX.
 

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Hey, just got a 2005 MDX 2 weeks ago, it has 160k. I did a tire rotation today and noticed this CV Boot leaking. The grease seems to be getting thrown everywhere. I haven't heard a noise at highway speeds. I am good with oil changes and spark plugs, etc, but have never changed out a CV axle. My question is, how urgent is this? Do I need to drop everything and fix this or can I replace this in the next few months?

Any input is appreciated.
Hard to see in your pic; but is there a band around the rubber boot(smaller end around the shaft)?
There should be one to make a seal against the shaft.
 

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1) Depends on how much grease you lost (ooo a lot I see in the pic)
2) Is there a hole in the CV boot or did they just not clamp it down? If a hole, get repaired asap.
Looks more like you lost a Clamp, I don't see anything in that pic that looks like a clamp on the smallest part of the boot (The leaking part)
3) Habby guy could probably post how long it takes.
 

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forbin404, thanks for the faith, but I have yet to do an MDX axle. That said, I've done plenty of others, and they are pretty much the same in the basics. I just had my son's Subaru axle out yesterday - took about 30-45 minutes (it took a little longer when I had to pull a pull a preload adjuster out to replace a seal). I assume the inside joint on the MDX axle is like the one on the Subaru (and my old Volvo), with three donut-shaped rollers riding on a three-pronged carrier. If so, you'd need to cut off the old boot (to save time) and then pop the inner joint apart (by prying, most likely). Then, clean and repack the bearing with synthetic grease, slide on the new boot, line up the carrier and give it a good thump with a soft mallet - or do what I did (after accidentally pulling my son's Subie axle apart when removing it), and stand it up on end and drop it onto the inner shaft (the weight of the rest of the shaft should pop the rollers through the little indents into their channels).

You can buy two different types of bands. The "best" is flat, circles the boot twice and requires a special tool to pull the band into tension tight and then it cuts off the excess and folds it over to keep the tension on (that's the type the original boot had). The other type is the one most home mechanics will use - it's got lots of holes (looks a little like a really long hose clamp). You just squeeze it around the boot and push down the "hook end" so that it grabs the "tightest holes" it can - then you just give a squeeze to the protruding bit with a pair of side cutters to squeeze it tight. I put one of those on my son's car yesterday, and it worked just fine - I wouldn't expect to ever have trouble with it (unlike the nylon zip tie the "professional mechanic" put on previously).

That's all fine as long as the CV axle isn't damaged from running too long with too little grease, or contaminated grease. If that's happened (or if there's any doubt) a new axle will save you time and energy - just slap it in and you're off to the races. There are a lot of youtube videos on the subject - the biggest trick is disconnecting the hub enough to get enough movement to allow sliding the axle stub out of the hub - and then getting it reconnected (normally, that means disconnecting a ball joint). Not rocket sciences, but you'll want to have a floor jack and something to pry with for most cars (again, I've never done an MDX, and hope to keep it that way). ;-)
 

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What I learned when I replaced the pass side axle was to go borrow the cv joint tool that incorporates a slide hammer. I've been wrenching my entire life, pulling down my diesel truck motor soon, and I couldn't pry the darn axle out no matter what it tried. I went and got the tool and in 3 increasingly hard whacks, less then 5 seconds, it was out. I was back at the store so fast the AutoZone guy thought I never left the parking lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Put it in

Got it put in today. Took less than an hour after watching multiple you tube videos. I went with after market. I think the OEM was 200$ and the Advance part after 30% off coupon was 60$. I learned that I had to whack the old axle way harder than I would have imagined. A 22 oz hammer didn't cut it. I had to use a 4 lb sledge hammer. Also, getting the new one was a pain and had to make certain that the new one was flush with the transmission. The other thing is that the original nut was 26 mm and the replacement was 25 mm. was Next step is changing out the radiator. I have read too many folks on here have issues. I have 160k on the original.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
noise

So, I have had this thing in for a week now and there is an audible noise coming from it. When I go from P to R there sounds like a metal "Clink" noise. The same noise happens when I go from R to D, there is the same "Clink" noise. It sounds like a wrench is tapping on a piece of metal. I haven't had the car long enough to know if it always did this. It doesn't make any noises when turning. I checked and the CV joint is seated correctly in the differential. Should I return to the store and get another one?
 

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A bad CV joint is only one of many things that can cause a clunk noise when the drivetrain is loaded and unloaded. Motor mount failure on Gen. 1 vehicles is well known.

Try listening under the hood as someone shifts the gears. You may be able to isolate the area or component.

Search youtube for "MDX motor mount"
 

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A motor mount that's got a really wasted bushing can cause that kind of noise. Have someone shift P-R-D-R-P (while standing on the brakes, of course) while you look at the engine/transmission to see how much it rotates. It should "jump" a little, but if it's rotating an inch or more, chances are you've got a bad mount somewhere.

And of course, some movement IS normal, so anything that's out of place enough to cause metal to metal contact could be suspect. Exhaust, hoses, metal shields, etc.

You can check out the new axle (to a point) by jacking up the front corner and spinning the wheel back and forth. There is some play in the transmission, but the sound you'll get is fairly muted (sounds like gears inside the transmission since that's what it is). If you're hearing a higher-pitched metallic "clink", it could be the axle. If it is, I'd expect there to be some twist in one of the boots (where you can grab the axle on either side of each boot, and twist in separate directions and get more than a tiny bit of rotation). If you ARE getting movement across one of the boots (and quite possibly some noise), then you've ID'd your problem, and you get to get even better at swapping out axles by doing another R&R. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Video of Noise

Here is a video of the noise. The CV joint seems flush with the transmission, all of the bushings seem ok. I am seriously at a loss. That, and as you can see I have noticed a transmission fluid leak from the axle's connection to the transmission. I am not sure if I need a new CV joint or new CV Axle Seal. Oh and checked motor mounts and they seem fine. Had one replaced when I did the timing belt service.

https://youtu.be/aqxH7eSdQ7Q
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Looks like the CV joint was defective. I swapped out for another one from Advance and no noise. Bad news is I put in an aftermarket Axle Seal and the transmission fluid poured out. I put some RTV on the outside of the seal and am waiting for it to cure. It fit snug, but not enough. I am hoping that this is the cure.
 

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Congrats on finding the source of the noise - no doubt that CV axle was bad (and going to get worse pretty fast, too, I'd guess).

You might get lucky on that seal - if you're just trying to get the seal to stay attached to the housing. The seal seems to be designed with a rubber-like outer shell to help keep the leaks down, so it's clear they're not expecting much torque on the seal. I'd say that if you were able to get the seal out and put a good schmear around the bore and around the seal's outside edge, it would probably be fine. If you just packed in some RTV... maybe. If you got it really, really clean first, probably. ;-)
 

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Yeah I have come to the realization. Aftermarket stuff some will work most won't. At this age Im at the point I just say forget it. Ill pony up the money and do it once.
 
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