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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Through trail and error I have found the best tool to remove those pesky retaining screws on the rotors.

It’s a Vessel P3 Impacta Driver:

Vessel 125943 908 P3x150 Impacta Screwdriver https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003BGTTSE/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_kg87AbR13F9PQ

It’s not a Phillips Head instead it’s a JIS P3 impact driver - which is what those screws are (JIS P3)

This driver took me 2 whacks with a 3lbs hammer and the screws loosened with no problem.

It only turns one way on impact so there is no mistaking the direction setting.

I have broken several PH3 impact driver bits trying to remove those pesky retaining screws. In the past I broke all my bits and had to resort to an air hammer to remove the screw. While highly effective it requires an air hammer and compressor but it was not as easy as this tool.

Best $15 I spent on a tool - hands down!
 

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Yep, I have some Vessel screwdrivers. They're my favorite screwdriver brand. Working on Japanese motorcycles would be a futile effort without them.

Impact screwdrivers are also great for rusty/stuck screws.
 

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Since you DIY pretty much all your maintenance (and you live in the snowbelt), I'd also recommend going forward that you address those rotor screws at the first opportunity when the wheels are dismounted. I try to do this early on when I get a new vehicle, like if I'm doing a tire rotation. You can either apply some anti-seize on the threads, or remove them altogether if you don't feel the need to keep them on. You'll pretty much have no worries about those screws a few years down the road when the brakes are due for replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Since you DIY pretty much all your maintenance (and you live in the snowbelt), I'd also recommend going forward that you address those rotor screws at the first opportunity when the wheels are dismounted. I try to do this early on when I get a new vehicle, like if I'm doing a tire rotation. You can either apply some anti-seize on the threads, or remove them altogether if you don't feel the need to keep them on. You'll pretty much have no worries about those screws a few years down the road when the brakes are due for replacement.
With this tool you really don’t need to preemptively worry. It really is the right tool for the job.

I normally would just leave them off but I found they actually help with aligning the caliper with with rotor when doing a full brake job (pads and rotors) especially the rears where the parking brake pushes on the inner drum.

With this tool I really have no concern anymore about leaving them on. I did apply anti-seize before putting them back on (just in case)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yep, I have some Vessel screwdrivers. They're my favorite screwdriver brand. Working on Japanese motorcycles would be a futile effort without them.

Impact screwdrivers are also great for rusty/stuck screws.
They are some good tools especially for Japanese vehicles. You live and learn - I am getting the full set now.
 
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