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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've had my mdx for almost 4 years now and this is the first time it's broken down. it has just under 170k on it right now. It became hesitant to start a few days prior to it dying but was hesitant to accelerate for a few months and bucked at times when accelerating. When it died going down the road I had no acceleration and upon coming to a stop it cut off and hasn't started since. It cranks but won't start. So far I've replaced the fuel pump, because that's what a family member said was wrong with it, and have since checked all the fuel related fuses. Another friend came over to try and diagnose what was wrong with it when he covered the driver side exhaust pipe it seemed to have started for a second and I'm guessing when he pulled his hand away is when it died out again. Has anyone else experienced this or can shed some light as to what could be wrong? My one friend has me worried as he thinks it's jumped time. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Also before the battery died I was getting the following codes; p0036, p0056, p0135, p0141, p0161, p0154, p0134, p0443, p0205, p0301, p0302, p0303, p0306, p0300, p0305, p0155, p2254, p0304. Some of these codes were constant and some of them didn't show up after clearing all the codes and resetting the CEL. Also the VTM-4 light sometimes accompanied the CEL, most often after initial start, but sometimes would pop on within the first mile or two driven.
 

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Replacing components based on something as generic as your symptoms was a shot in the dark (with predictable expensive and unsuccessful results).

All the codes you got with a dead battery are just spurious codes caused by your computers all getting scrambled by the low voltage. You did the right thing by clearing them.

The "new codes" all seem to be relating to O2 sensors. Interesting, but I don't think anything that will cause your current problems.

Here's what I'd do if it was my car.

1) Get a can of starting fluid and spray a few seconds worth into the air box, and see if it fires up for a few seconds. If it does, you know you have a fuel system problem, and can proceed accordingly. If it doesn't fire up, you know you have a compression and/or ignition problem.

2) (and this is the one that's probably going to show you what's wrong) Pull back the timing belt covers on top of the engine, and look to see if there's any sign of a bad belt. If it's got any (!) visible damage, you know that's gonna be the problem. If the car has never had a new timing belt, it's WAY (!!!!!) overdue. The real check would be to line up the crank pulley timing mark and see if the cams are both also lined up (I'm betting they're not).

And then just in case you thought I wasn't going to try and scare you, if the problem IS the timing belt, AND if it slipped more than a couple teeth, the valves would have gotten into a fistfight with the pistons, and reduced your engine (or at the very least, one or both heads) to large, expensive paperweights.

An aside - usually when a Honda timing belt slips, the engine will sound "lumpy" when you engage the starter - different than it did when it was right.

The symptom is also consistent with a bad crank position sensor, but that almost always throws a code (which yours didn't). That's the first thing I'd check AFTER the timing belt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tried the starting fluid as well previously sorry forgot to mention that looks like I need to look at the timing belt. To the best of my knowledge it has never been changed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So the o2 sensor codes were due to the fact that the electrical connectors weren't plugged in all the way. Once I plugged those in it seems like it wants to start more so than before. I haven't had the time to check the timing belt just yet.
 

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Careful - if the problem IS that the timing belt is off a couple teeth, continually trying to start the engine could cause it to slip more, which could take the repair from "new timing belt" to "new engine".
 
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