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Discussion Starter #1
When I replaced my front struts and shocks, there was no noise from the front right wheel after driving for a couple days. Then I did the alignment, balanced, and rotated tires. That was when I start hearing the noise. I thought maybe the noise was caused by the tire rotation. I've never rotated before. Also, the tire was 1/32 thread lower than the left side, and dried-crack. I've just replaced four new tires [Michelin Premier LTX], alignment and balanced and all, but the noise is still there on the right front wheel.

Any ideas?
 

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Three ways to check for a wheel bearing issue:

1. Make a note of the speed, when the noise begins start to accelerate. Does the noise increase? If it does it's a bearing going bad and will eventually get louder.

2. Make the noise noticeable, as you approach a sweeping, right bend in the road. If the noise goes away, your bearing is bad. Repeat while going into a sweeping, left bend in the road. If the noise goes away, your bearing is bad.

3. Get both front tires off of the ground and the vehicle on to jack stands. Grab a tire at 6 & 12 o'clock and wiggle. There should not be any movement. Do the wiggle test at 3 & 9 o'clock also. Repeat on the other front tire.

The good thing about bad bearings is, they will bug you until you get them replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've just replaced the front bearings two weeks ago. The noise was before it. Maybe the brake pads rubbing the rotor? I put new brake pads on but did not replace the rotors. The oem replacement pads were a little larger than what I replaced.
 

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Check to make sure you didn't bend your brake dust shield in anyway to contact the rotor.
 

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Did you push the caliper pistons all the way back in before you put the new pads on? Are the slide pins needing re-greasing?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Did you push the caliper pistons all the way back in before you put the new pads on? Are the slide pins needing re-greasing?
Yes, the caliper pistons were pushed in for me to be able to slide the new pads in. The slide pins were removed, cleaned, and re-greased with 3M silicone paste/gel.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
"noise" is pretty vague. could you provide a better description of the noise itself or when it occurs?
I don't know how to describe it, it's not high pitch sound. Slow speed I can hear faint rubbing. High speed it becomes like "hmmm".
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Could a little dimple on one of the lug nut made the wheel not snuggly tight? I'm going to try a couple things tomorrow.
1. move that dimple lug nut to the other side.
2. then move the rotor to the other side.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
From TireRack

Tires are comprised of many layers of rubber, steel and fabric. Due to these different components, your new tires require a break-in period to ensure that they deliver their normal ride quality and maximum performance. As tires are cured, a release lubricant is applied to prevent them from sticking in their mold. Some of the lubricant stays on the surface of your tires, reducing traction until it is worn away. Five hundred miles of easy acceleration, cornering and braking will allow the mold release lubricant to wear off, allowing the other tire components to begin working together. It is also important to note that your old tires probably had very little tread depth remaining when you felt it was time to replace them. As any autocrosser or racer who has tread rubber shaved off of his tires will tell you, low tread depth tires respond more quickly. Don't be surprised if your new tires are a little slower to respond (even if you use the exact same tire as before). Their new, full depth brings with it a little more tread squirm until they wear down.

"...your new tires require a break-in period to ensure that they deliver their normal ride quality and maximum performance. "

Note: Be careful whenever you explore the capabilities of your new tires. Remember that every tire requires a break-in period of 500 miles for optimum performance.

I'm heading to Canada tomorrow, the trip will give me 650 miles round trip. Let's see if the noise is reduced when the tire is broken in.

I did jack up the car after work, and spun the wheels. It made noise....sounded like a flute on both front wheels. The sound is very low, and it comes from the brake/caliper assembly. It must be the new pads scratching the old rotors. I can see the inner area with new scratch mark...about 1/16th.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well..It seems the new tires made those noise. ABout 150 miles into it, I noticed lesser noise. After 600 miles later, no pronounced noise. Just typical road noise now.

Just noticed too...new Michelin Premier LTX is 8/32nd. I hope I don't need new tires within a year.
 
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