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Discussion Starter #1
Somehow my battery knew it was over 4 years old now so it decided to fail. It's about 4 years and 3 months since I purchased the vehicle new.

Symptom -
The door unlocked, the rear gate still worked, the seat adjusted itself, but when I hit the start button it was like New Year's with headlights rapidly flashing on/off, many lights on the dash on, lots of clicking from relays in the dash area, but the engine wasn't turning over.

Troubleshooting -
This took about 1 second - I immediately knew it was almost certainly the battery, and it was. To take it an extra step, I measured the voltage on the battery and it was 12.09v - somewhat low but not as low as I expected. Nevertheless, it was a 'non-load' measurement which means it likely dropped tremendously once the started tried to engage - but I didn't bother to measure that.

Replacement Battery -
I bought an Exide Global Extreme, part number 24FX, form factor 24F, which is the same as 24R (which is the form factor of the factory battery), at Home Depot for $99. This replacement battery is 800 Cold Cranking Amps whereas the factory one was 610 CCA. This new battery has a 40 month full replacement warranty. You can buy the same or similar batteries elsewhere but the Home Depot one was convenient for me and is a good price for a good battery - hopefully it'll prove to last at least as long as the factory and the specs in CCA are higher than the factory one.

Replacement Procedure (it's quicker to do than it looks - should take 10-15 minutes) -
- Pop open the hood.
- Pop off the large plastic shroud that covers the radiator area that goes the full width of the engine bay.
- Use a small screwdriver or specialty tool to remove the few plastic retainers of the air intake plastic duct that's directly over the battery (front right side of vehicle when standing in front facing the engine bay). I used a specialty tool that I bought for this eventuality that I keep in the vehicle - I think less than $10 from Amazon. Pop the intake duct off of the air filter box by just twisting it a bit and pulling - there's a rubber seal holding it there. This part is easy to do.
--> Always disconnect the negative terminal first in order to prevent an accidental short that could happen if the positive is removed first - i.e. when the wrench might connect between positive and a metal part of the vehicle.
- Use a 10mm socket to loosen the battery clamp on the negative terminal and remove the cable from the terminal and stuff it out of the way.
- Use the same 10mm socket to remove the positive cable.
- Use the same 10mm socket (I used a deep one) to remove the plastic wire hold down that's on the top of the battery hold down threaded retainer on the right side.
- Use the same 10mm socket to remove the 2 threaded bracket retainers and remove the hold down bracket.
- Remove the thin plastic box surrounding the battery - just lift it off.
- Lift out the old battery.
--> Always connect the positive battery clamp first to avoid the possibility of causing a short with the wrench.
- If there's any rust or white acid corrosion fluff on the terminals, clean them with a wire brush or a paste made of water and baking soda. My positive was completely clean and the negative had just a bit of the white stuff on it, which I cleaned off with a wire brush - battery terminal cleaner brush.
- Put in the new battery and reverse the procedure to secure it. Don't over tighten the cable clamps - they s/b snug but don't go overboard here.
- Start the vehicle to make sure it works okay now and when the infotainment indicates 'Enter Code' press the power button for around 2 seconds for it to set itself with the code - i.e. you don'treally need to enter a code on this screen.

Mine did 'not' lose the driver preference settings even though the battery was disconnected.

When done take the old battery to Home Depot (in my case) to get the core charge refund ($15 at my Home Depot) and so it'll get recycled.
 

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Thanks MDXstang.

It would be better if you can do a video on how to remove/replace a battery, that will be very helpful for others. Just saying lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
^^ I didn't do a video for this but based on your suggestion I attached an image of the original battery since many people probably haven't seen the battery underneath the plastic shrouds. It shows the form type, CCA, etc. as well as how the hold down bracket looks.

Replacing the battery is really quite simple, straightforward, and quick and doesn't require much in the way of mechanical knowledge - just heed my warnings about the negative cable being the first cable disconnected and last cable reconnected to avoid accidentally shorting the wrench you're holding in your hand.
 

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Remember to perform the "idle learn" procedure, and you may also have to reset the auto window down/up feature, if it stops working.
 

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Remember to perform the "idle learn" procedure, and you may also have to reset the auto window down/up feature, if it stops working.
Thanks for the heads-up but I don't see anything in the owner's manual referring to an 'idle learn' procedure or necessity. I did google it and can see it applied to a bunch of older Acura/Honda vehicles. It seems like a silly requirement to me (not that my opinion matters) and if it is a requirement for such a routine incident like a battery replacement, it should be in the owner's manual. Better yet, it shouldn't be necessary at all. The vehicle should, like most computerized vehicles on the road, be smart enough to know when it needs to perform a learning procedure and just do it on its own.

I googled around a bit but didn't see where it was explained exactly why an idle learn procedure needed to be done and what the symptoms are if it's not done. If someone knows this, and if you know if it specifically applies to the 3rd gen MDX, please post it here. Just because it was something necessary on a Honda 10 or 15 years ago doesn't mean it still needs to be done with more current models - at least I hope vehicles have gotten smarter since then.

I'd say 'most' people who replace a battery will know nothing about an idle learn procedure, won't have access to (or bother to consult with) specialized service manuals possibly containing a procedure for this, and won't perform one. It's unreasonable to expect most people to go to an Acura dealer for something like a battery replacement - especially when they fail and stick the vehicle somewhere other than an Acura service bay. Most likely it'd be a random AAA person who replaces it, someone at some random garage, someone at an independent shop, some shade tree guy next door, or someone like me.

Given that, I checked the seat settings for driver 1 and 2 - still works. I checked the infotainment settings for stations and pairing to my phone - still works. I checked the auto up/down windows - still works. I checked the garage door opener - still works. The idle itself - was still smooth (I've had some initial roughness on some other vehicles after a battery change until it learned for a couple of minutes to smooth out). If the vehicle retained all those settings I think there's an excellent chance it retained 'learning' settings.

In short, despite the battery being disconnected for maybe 10 minutes or so, all the settings were retained. Maybe if it was dead or without a battery for days there'd have been some issue in the retained memory settings and a need for some learning - hopefully automated rather than the goofy procedure I saw for older Hondas.

If I end up noticing a problem I'll post it here.
 

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I don't understand why you all just don't use a Memory Saver. Simple when changing batteries. Most cars have memory settings, code settings, etc. Especially, if you have multiple vehicles, a memory saver is a must have. With a Memory Saver...you don't have to worry about settings or codes.
 

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Not sure about any other makes, but I believe that Nissan products have a similar reset procedure for their engines as well.

I thought that Honda engines do eventually go through the idle learn procedure on their own, it just takes much longer and the car has to be run and driven for a certain amount of time. It seems like the purpose of doing the idle learn procedure immediately after a battery replacement was to get the engine running optimally right from the get go.

When I had the battery disconnected on my Nissan product and my older Honda, I never bothered to perform any of those reset procedures; and I never noticed anything wrong or different with how they ran afterwards.
 

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Just did mine. It seem to have kept all memory except your A and mpg history. Acura in Canada wanted about $250 for a battery change. Bought a 24F with 710 CCA at Costco for $125 and did it myself in about 15 minutes.
 
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