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2016 MDX Adv/Ent Sh-AWD, 52K miles

B123 service sign came on and when I called the dealer, I was told the cost is $600! I know most of the listed services are for preventive measure. Do I really have to get this done, other than the oil change, or should I wait until the next service when it goes over 60K?

Also does anyone here get your services at somewhere other than the dealership?
 

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B123 is:


B = Oil + filter change
1 = Tire rotation
2 = Engine air filter + cabin air filter change
3 = Transmission and transfer case fluid change


The "3" is why the cost is so high.


YES YOU NEED TO DO THESE SERVICES!
Do not delay them.


DIY of B, 1, and 2 are super easy.
DIY of 3 is harder, as it requires either a CANBUS compatible scan tool, HDS, or similar. If you have access to that, then you can DIY, otherwise you should use the dealer.
 

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Curious as to why a scan tool or similar is needed for #3...Thanks..

Someone other than dealer for service...Yes, I use a local Honda/Acura specialist..owner used to be one of the main Techs at local Acura dealer...but I’m south of Atlanta...
 

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Curious as to why a scan tool or similar is needed for #3...Thanks..
The ZF9HP48 transmission, which is used in the 2016 MDX, uses ATF Type 3.1 fluid. ATF Type 3.1 changes volume, based on temperature. As the fill plug is at a fixed height in the transmission housing, you must check the transmission fluid level within a narrow range of temperatures. The transmission fluid temperature is measured by a sensor, and that data is published on the CANBUS. You need an appropriate tool to read that data.

Honda Diagnostic System is the official way to read that sensor data.
However, any decent scan tool with CANBUS support can also read that sensor data.

The least-expensive method for reading that sensor data is probably the ScanGauge II, which can be had for around $160.


If you have access to one of these tools, then you can properly DIY the transmission fluid change. If you do not have access to the appropriate tool, then you should not attempt the procedure. I would suggest NOT using a generic mechanic for this procedure UNLESS they are familiar with this transmission and already know how to properly change the fluid level. I would not trust a mechanic who just tries to use a fluid exchange machine -- or even worse, tries to use an infrared thermometer.
 

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The ZF9HP48 transmission, which is used in the 2016 MDX, uses ATF Type 3.1 fluid. ATF Type 3.1 changes volume, based on temperature. As the fill plug is at a fixed height in the transmission housing, you must check the transmission fluid level within a narrow range of temperatures. The transmission fluid temperature is measured by a sensor, and that data is published on the CANBUS. You need an appropriate tool to read that data.

Honda Diagnostic System is the official way to read that sensor data.
However, any decent scan tool with CANBUS support can also read that sensor data.

The least-expensive method for reading that sensor data is probably the ScanGauge II, which can be had for around $160.


If you have access to one of these tools, then you can properly DIY the transmission fluid change. If you do not have access to the appropriate tool, then you should not attempt the procedure. I would suggest NOT using a generic mechanic for this procedure UNLESS they are familiar with this transmission and already know how to properly change the fluid level. I would not trust a mechanic who just tries to use a fluid exchange machine -- or even worse, tries to use an infrared thermometer.
All that sounds like a problem looking for a solution. Remind me to avoid that 9 speed. 14 and 15 sound like the way to go on the 3rd gen to me. But thanks for the answer.
 

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All that sounds like a problem looking for a solution. Remind me to avoid that 9 speed. But thanks for the answer.
This is not unique to the ZF. This is becoming common in the industry. Even GM is doing it with their 6, 8, and 10 speed transmissions.



 

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This is not unique to the ZF. This is becoming common in the industry. Even GM is doing it with their 6, 8, and 10 speed transmissions.
I watched the video you posted. That's quite a process to just check the fluid level or replace it.

This also demonstrates the importance of the particular trans fluid type in some (most) transmissions as well as understanding the correct procedure to follow. I've seen various posts from people wondering if they can just get 'whatever' trans fluid brand from Autozone or the like and use it instead of the OEM fluid - or even try to 'better the fluid' by using an aftermarket source. I've stated before that today's transmissions in particular are designed for specific fluids, not just the brand but even a subtype within the brand, and that IMO it's best to just go with the OEM fluid rather than something else. It's the safest bet.

And if a transmission has a complex method for replacing/checking the fluid level then in some cases it may be best to just have the dealer do it who's familiar with the proper technique, and I mean the dealer or a specialized qualified mechanic - not a kwik-e-lube type place where the person changing the fluid often (probably usually) has no specific training on the particular transmission and perhaps no specialized test equipment, and could end up ruining the trans or at least make it so it doesn't operate correctly. I'm saying this as a DIY type person. Luckily, the trans fluid in all my vehicles, including the 2014 MDX (6 speed) is more straightforward and easier to replace and foolproof than something like the procedure in that video.
 

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This also demonstrates the importance of the particular trans fluid type in some (most) transmissions as well as understanding the correct procedure to follow. I've seen various posts from people wondering if they can just get 'whatever' trans fluid brand from Autozone or the like and use it instead of the OEM fluid - or even try to 'better the fluid' by using an aftermarket source. I've stated before that today's transmissions in particular are designed for specific fluids, not just the brand but even a subtype within the brand, and that IMO it's best to just go with the OEM fluid rather than something else. It's the safest bet.
I agree. This is also why I always recommend the proper fluids and recommend against additives, such as LubeGuard.



And if a transmission has a complex method for replacing/checking the fluid level then in some cases it may be best to just have the dealer do it who's familiar with the proper technique, and I mean the dealer or a specialized qualified mechanic - not a kwik-e-lube type place where the person changing the fluid often (probably usually) has no specific training on the particular transmission and perhaps no specialized test equipment, and could end up ruining the trans or at least make it so it doesn't operate correctly. I'm saying this as a DIY type person. Luckily, the trans fluid in all my vehicles, including the 2014 MDX (6 speed) is more straightforward and easier to replace and foolproof than something like the procedure in that video.
Yes and no. For some people who don't have the time/patience/tools to do the procedure properly, the dealer may be the lesser of the evils. I absolutely cringe at the thought of someone using a quick-lube place, however.



Personally, I will be doing my transmission fluid, myself. It's been my observation that no one cares more about my vehicle than I do, and I'm motivated to do things properly, even if that means taking longer to do the job.
 

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Personally, I will be doing my transmission fluid, myself. It's been my observation that no one cares more about my vehicle than I do, and I'm motivated to do things properly, even if that means taking longer to do the job.
That's a factor for me as well in why I do most service myself. Of course, it's also less expensive but also more convenient to do it myself rather than taking it somewhere out of my way and sitting around waiting for them to get it done or worse, getting a courtesy car and then having to come back yet again when they get done with it - it's just much easier to change fluids myself in my driveway.
 

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I agree that the recommended oil should be used until someone makes a better oil.! The number of times the manufacturers have changed the recommended trans oil is surprisingly high! The outcome is usually a fully synthetic trans fluid taking all metals into consideratiom. Regardless $600.00 for a B123 service is absurd! You had better go get yourself the Can Bus reader which there are many and perform the task yourself. This is not rocket science and as stated you are likley going to do the job correctly even if it takes you an hour longer! You will be using it a number of times and you will have paid for it with the first change!
 

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I don't know how you guys feel about by having the dealer to replace the trans fluid. The thing Is i don't have the tools around and the trans is still warranty so i wouldn't want to mess up. Even after dealer replaced the fluid, the car drove not smooth at all, very jerky and too heavy. I don't know if the tech follow the procedure on how to replace the 9sp trans. Time will tell.
 

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Irobot2090 This is the reason why many do not take their cars to the dealers as they seem to be less informed then the actual owners! Gone are the days when mechanics actually had to complete training and demonstrate their knowledge of the procedure, those who had not undergone these training sessions could not conduct the work untill they had. Seems to day they let anyone work on them just reading the procedure from a computer screen without any actual training on the new stuff. So the theroy is that You are better off doing the maintenance yourself as you will give it some thought and do it with care and know that it was done correctly. There is so much fear put out there that only the dealership can,should service the vehical which is nonsense on these scheduled fluid changes. Keep in mind that you can find out the actual procedure and purchase a tool that you can keep to perform the same procedure for a fraction of the cost especially the procedure needs to be repeated a number of times over the course of ownership.




Do keep us up to date on if things smooth out and jerkyness goes away.
 

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Well, I am an DIY guy, I did everything myself except the 9sp Trans, it's just too new and of course it's still under warranty so i wouldn't bother to touch it.
 

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Well, I am an DIY guy, I did everything myself except the 9sp Trans, it's just too new and of course it's still under warranty so i wouldn't bother to touch it.
Your actions do not match your words.
 

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Just did B123 at a dealer by San Jose, CA. Cost was about ~$1K, which was really surprising as I thought I had it all covered under the maintenance plan (Acura Care) I had purchased previously when I bought the car. Turns out the maintenance is scheduled for right after the plan expires lol. Nice business model I guess. And the brake service they said it needed when the maintenance plan was still in effect wasn't done, so they tacked that on as well. Nice dealer, very nice.
 

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Just did B123 at a dealer by San Jose, CA. Cost was about ~$1K, which was really surprising as I thought I had it all covered under the maintenance plan (Acura Care) I had purchased previously when I bought the car. Turns out the maintenance is scheduled for right after the plan expires lol. Nice business model I guess. And the brake service they said it needed when the maintenance plan was still in effect wasn't done, so they tacked that on as well. Nice dealer, very nice.
For a Grand, I would contact Acura Customer Relations and ask for some consideration. Possibly a refund on the Acura Care policy?
 
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