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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if anyone dumped the spare for weight and or ride improvement?

Personally, I prefer a tire slime kit to having to mess with wheel removal in case of flat.
 

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why would anyone want to remove the spare? it's not that heavy anyway. the car is like 4000lbs already, +- 100 isn't make any difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
why would anyone want to remove the spare? it's not that heavy anyway. the car is like 4000lbs already, +- 100 isn't make any difference.
Well it must have some benefit, probably to the rear suspension, otherwise why would the FWD version delete it?

And like I said, if you carry tire slime and would never use the spare anyway...
 

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The last two flats I had on my RDX needed a spare tire. Slime, air compressor, or plugs can't repair anything in the sidewall or something larger than a nail in the tread. I like having a donut spare in the RDX with a full size spare at home if I can't fix/replace the tire for a while (RDX mostly a commuter vehicle). I dumped the donut spare for a full size for the MDX (main travel car and usually towing or maxed out in space in the rear when traveling).

I would do a dount spare at a min and still keep the slime.
 

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The MDX is already 60/40 weight distribution that I would prefer to actually keep it on. Our front rotors are 12.6" vs 13.0" in the rear anyway, so I'd hate to shift the distribution more front with the puny rotors we have.
 

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Well it must have some benefit, probably to the rear suspension, otherwise why would the FWD version delete it?

And like I said, if you carry tire slime and would never use the spare anyway...
they remove it in the FWD version to keep the cost down.
 

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they remove it in the FWD version to keep the cost down.
THIS.

The FWD version is tailored to cut costs.

with AWD my spare was preinstalled + I carry slime/plugs just in case. at 40k/year on the road, I'd rather have my bases covered. a few pounds of weight isn't worth the headache when I need to swap tires (there are road hazards out there beyond a simple nail/screw, you can't slime a gashed sidewall)

A spare tire is the difference between needing to wait for a flatbed on the way to something more important. I'll take the spare.
 

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otherwise why would the FWD version delete it?
I'll echo what others said - to keep costs down.

I've had flats before that would have stuck me where I was, including some out of the way places with no cell phone coverage, if not for an actual spare tire. If there's sidewall damage it won't be able to be repaired with a can of fix-a-flat or the like.

In addition, when one uses the fix-a-flat technique there's always a certain anxiety when driving on it because it could blow out at any time depending on the type of puncture.

An actual spare tire, including the one included with the AWD MDX, is far better than the can of slime and if I had purchased a FWD MDX I would have also purchased a spare tire kit and installed it - either the actual spare tire kit or a regular full size wheel/tire for the purpose.

I doubt if the added weight would even make a noticeable difference in mileage. As far as handling - the dynamics of handling encompass a large number of variables and the vehicle is designed with those variables. I doubt the spare tire, especially given its location down low in the middle side to side, has a significant impact on the handling. As far as the actual ride - it may have a positive effect on the ride due to adding at least a bit of weight for the rear dampers. Have you ever noticed how a pickup truck (or SUV) is less skittish with a bit of weight over the rear axle?
 

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or get a set of runflats for a peace of mind. While the ride may be a bit harsher, I actually prefer them over regular tires especially while traveling. Not a fan of changing or repairing tire on the interstate.
 

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or get a set of runflats for a peace of mind. While the ride may be a bit harsher, I actually prefer them over regular tires especially while traveling. Not a fan of changing or repairing tire on the interstate.
I've heard of run flats being messed up and cars needing to be towed. I guess it's mostly cars like BMW. People being stuck overnight because a local dealer didn't have a tire. I'll take having a spare. Besides,don't we have roadside assistance for 4 years? Or AAA or insurance including roadside assistance? There is no sure fire solution.
 

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I've heard of run flats being messed up and cars needing to be towed. I guess it's mostly cars like BMW. People being stuck overnight because a local dealer didn't have a tire. I'll take having a spare. Besides,don't we have roadside assistance for 4 years? Or AAA or insurance including roadside assistance? There is no sure fire solution.
True, but with the runflats you'll be able to drive to a safe location where you can plug it or replace it with the spare. Hell, you can even keep going for 50-100 miles with no air if you don't feel like messing with it. You'll have to replace the tire at that point but what's more important, the safety of your family or a $300 tire? I know, some of you will argue "but what if the runflat blows up"? Well, what if a meteorite hits your car? What if your transmission falls off? There are a lot of "ifs" and "buts" but one can not dispute the fact that runflats are much safer than a regular tire. :29:
 

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I don't like RTFs at all on my BMW; expensive, harsh, and hard to find when you need to replace them. To me, spare tire makes the most sense. So glad the MDX didn't come with RTFs.
 

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Just experienced the first flat on the '14 MDX. And guess what no spare. So after roadside assistance shows up, they say "oh this happens all the time". Really? A $50K car without a spare. Absolutely a joke. So thank god it was here in town. So I drove my '16 MDX AWD to her location to put my spare on on mhy wife's car. Drove her cart to the dealership and raise cane with them because this is the same tire I had them look at for losing air for the SECOND TIME two weeks ago. So $275 later, I have a new tire which is the tire they supposedly fixed with a plug. So I asked for the cost for a spare tire kit for her 2014 MDX and guess what? The cost is $1199 installed!!!! Acura's design team has their collective heads so far up their collective rectal cavities it's not even funny. Love the cars, my wife loves hers especially. But why in the world would a car make not have a spare tire. In town is one thing. On the road like we usually are traveling for soccer, a flat in the middle of nowhere at night without a spare tire, is simply inexcusable by any car maker. Would never have purchased this car had I known it didn't have a spare tire. Never mentioned by the sales person either and of course never thought to ask. Common sense just isn't so common any more. I am 56 years old and have been around cars my entire life buying and fixing up if you will. This design elimination to hold down production costs while charging more after taking out the cost, is simply inexcusable by any means. I will trade it in before I spend $1200 for one tire and cheap steel rim and a cheesy rope pulley system which is on my 2016. UGHHHH!!!!
 

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Which version of MDX don't have the spare tire pulley systems for a spare tire? I need to make sure to avoid those versions when I upgrade in a few years. I just assumed all MDXs had the pulley system minus the donut spare for certain versions.
 

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Only AWDs have spare tires. Look under the car at the rear to make sure it's there on a used vehicle. Sometimes the first owner doesn't replace it.
 

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Would never have purchased this car had I known it didn't have a spare tire.
... Never mentioned by the sales person
You need to know what you bought - especially something like a spare tire. It's mentioned in the literature for the vehicle, mentioned all over this forum, and is something you should have checked even if you 'assumed' it would just have one.

I've never purchased a vehicle (new or used) without checking to make sure the spare is actually there since even if the vehicle is supposed to have one (not your case), it could have gone missing somehow. You should also check the spare's inflation every now and then so you don't end up with a flat one when you need it. In the case of the MDX FWD, like a number of other vehicles on the market today (including a BMW X5), it doesn't come with a spare. That should have been immediately evident to you when you checked out this area, if not before the purchase and if not on the delivery, then at least right afterwards. You don't want to find out the tire replacement/spare process when you actually get a flat - invariably in an inconvenient location and at an inconvenient time. Your age and experience are working against you on this point - cars used to always come with a spare, as you're used to, but times have changed so your expectations need to change. Disclaimer - I'm older than you.

And - don't ever rely on a salesperson for anything - especially to tell you what the vehicle does 'not' have. A salesperson's entire focus is to make the sale - that's it. They're not really your friend and certainly not your advocate.

All isn't lost - you can retrofit a spare on this vehicle. You can put the factory spare in or even go with some aftermarket or used solutions. This appears to be an easy thing to do yourself rather than have the dealer do it and that can save you a lot of money. There are a few threads on this forum where people have done that and reading those can guide you as to the more reasonable solutions.

I highly recommend you get a physical spare for this vehicle and then you s/b set.
 

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Generally speaking, when it comes to installing accessories Acura dealers really like to run up the bill - and that starting from high parts costs from Acura. $1200? Obscene, but thoroughly believable. Try pricing a trailer hitch with wiring - some of the prices given here approach $2k. So buy what you need from one of our sponsors (see OEM Acura MDX 2016 TEMPORARY WHEEL KIT parts) and either spend an hour yourself or hire an independent mechanic. Note that the kit only costs $53, but the tire is $325. Consider buying a Goodyear tire of the same size for $222 on Walmart's website. Or make me an offer for my new 2016 temp tire on steel rim that I am replacing with a full size spare.
 
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