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I just removed my alternator for the second time in about a year. I exchanged my original for this one from a supposedly reputable shop. When I told them it died just past the one-year warranty, they said that wasn't normal and to bring it in for them to diagnose it. We'll see what they say.

In any case, I thought it would be much easier the second time around, but my memory isn't the greatest and it turned out to be just as much a pain in the a$$ as it was the first time, because I forgot about a few undocumented steps that I figured out the hard way. It didn't help that there aren't any DIY's on this (specifically for the 2007 model), so here is one based on the service manual and some additional tips in red:





TIP: The tensioner nut is 14 mm. Wouldn't you know it, the serpentine belt tool I got from Princess Auto came with 4 sockets, none of which were 14. Luckily I had a 14 in 12 point that made it easier to line up the socket on the nut and still have room to move the handle enough to release the belt. That said, although this is listed as step 3, waiting until after step 5 makes it much easier once everything is out of the way.




TIP: Remove the power steering reservoir bracket to give you more room to extract the alternator. Easier to do now than when you're trying to balance the alternator on one hand trying not to drop it and scrape the tensioner pulley. I also snaked the reservoir under and over to the right side of the AC line to hold it out of the way. Just be careful that the metal clamps don't cut the AC line, and don't tilt it so much that the power steering fluid leaks out the cap.



TIP: Removing the coil pack that sits above the alternator may give you better clearance to see and get your hands down to remove the cables in the next step.





"then remove the alternator" LOL. Not so simple. If yours is like mine, the bolts come out easily enough, but you also have to remove the upper mounting bracket. Then, you have to wiggle the alternator loose, pushing an pulling forward and backward along the axis of the lower bolt. Once it feels loose on that axis, you still won't be able to pull it out until you "twist" it to loosen the bushing(s) - that is, you need to push on the left side towards the firewall while pulling on the right towards the rad, or vice-versa. This compresses the bushings to free the alternator from the lower mounting tab. Now the fun part - getting it out of the engine bay. You want to keep it roughly in the position it was in when mounted as you slide it out to the left, but mine just wouldn't clear the AC line, so with one hand I guided the alternator, and with the other I used the serpentine tool to push on the tensioner to move it out of the way and provide clearance. Once past the tensioner, you want to start pointing the pulley side up and pull it straight up out of the bay. The alternator orientation that is required as you pull it up can be seen in the above photo of the alternator sitting on the fuse box.
 

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Suggest that you use "Anti-Seize" lubricant on the alternator bolt threads when you re-assemble. A combination of dissimilar metals (Aluminum and Steel) as well as currents running to ground from the alternator to the block can cause the threads to lock a bit too much.
 

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Suggest that you use "Anti-Seize" lubricant on the alternator bolt threads when you re-assemble. A combination of dissimilar metals (Aluminum and Steel) as well as currents running to ground from the alternator to the block can cause the threads to lock a bit too much.
Should you decide to do so, you will need to figure out how much LESS torque to apply so you don't over-stretch the bolts (and possibly snap them). The torque spec in the manual is for dry - lubrication increases the effective torque due to the lack of friction, but I don't know offhand if there is a formula for calculating it. Just be careful, there's barely enough room to get your hands in there. Imagine trying to extract studs...
 

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There is a very good and detailed you tube video labeled "2007 Acura MDX alternator replacement"
The guy mentions, but doesn't emphasize, the need to be careful reinstalling steel bolts into an aluminum block. There is enough room to use a torque wrench. The upper 12mm bolt, which holds the alternator should be torqued to 16 ft/lbs The lower 14mm bolt needs to be torqued to 33 ft/lbs
 
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