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Discussion Starter #1
Thought I’d make a separate thread playing off the original title with some tips for all of those dealing with rusted fasteners but still want to diy the sport rear sway in the tech. Our mdxs are getting older every day so hopefully this is a helpful topic for future searches.

I live in the ne Ohio rust belt and my mdx has seen 10 salty winters. I’d recommend reviewing the original diy to get familiar with the process then jump here to round out your knowledge. Here are some pics and tips.

original thread link:

https://www.mdxers.org/forums/74-second-generation-mdx-2007-2013/43170-adv-like-handling-tech-like-price.html

#1 have extra fasteners or buy new, I snapped all but one bolt, more on that later. You will need 4 bracket bolts and two new end links (moog are good).

#2 forget the conventional tools, they may not work, I used a sawzall, vise grips, a pry bar and hammer, an air chisel and a breaker bar, a hand chisel will work if you don’t have air tools. Also conventional sized metric sockets.

Start by dropping the spare and removing it, then remove the “subframe stiffener” under the spare (6 bolts size 10). Try not to break these as they are captive on the other end and you will be drilling and tapping if they snap. Use pb blaster and whatever size socket fits best, I used a size 11 socket because it fit better due to the rust buildup,

Then loosen the lugs on both rear wheels and jack up the rear of the vehicle in the center. Remove the wheels.

Go straight for your sawzall or cutoffwheel. Cut the endlinks midshaft on both sides. If using the sawzall be careful, when they let loose your saw could be heading for delicate components such as axle boots or brake lines if you are careless.

Now take an appropriate sized pry bar and hammer and pry the lower end link socket off of its ball (bolted to the lower control arm). It can be tricky, if you need to you can slice the boot with a utility knife to make it slightly easier. You will be leaving the top endlink connection completely alone and removing it with the sway.

Once you have the bare ball exposed grip it tight with the vise grips and back the nut on the other side out. I used a few extensions to make clearance for the gun. Air tools made this super easy and this is probably the most crucial step you need them for. If you don’t have access to them go buy a 1/2” electric impact it will make life a breeze. The location makes cutting this fastener difficult.

Now you need to remove the 4 bolts for the isolator brackets (they look like saddles and there’s two bolts on each side). Honestly this was a breeze, get your socket on there and breaker bar, snap the heads clean off these pricks with the breaker bar. the nut on the back side isn’t welded to the connection point, so once the heads are off take your air chisel or hand chisel and big ass hammer and blow those bastard nuts right off of the back side, the end result is a clean open hole ready to accept that new hardware you bought (right? Lol). I went to the spare bolt bin and found 4 very easily, they are a common Honda size.

I undid the 2 rear exhaust hangers on both sides and supported the weight of the exhaust with jack stands for added clearance.

Shimmy the old bar out and slide the new one in, grease points as recommended in other thread, install new end links and isolator bushings/brackets with new hardware.

You can preload the suspension before final tq spec and putting the weight of the vehicle back onto the suspension.

This job took me 4 hours which is 3 longer than it shouldhave, hopefully this helps someone.

Pictures of carnage:




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You can go to Ace Hardware or True Value and buy some plumber's silicone grease ($6) and use it to lube the new rubber bushings that are held on, by those saddle shaped brackets, to eliminate squeaks.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes any silicone based grease will work, the other thread covers that so I didn’t see a need to mention it again. As always, best practice is to grease moving parts/hardware upon reinstalling.
 
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