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Discussion Starter #1
I ran into a flat-tire situation today...Sadly, just blew one of my tires on a minor curb hit.
Its still puzzling to me that i happened; how could the sidewall burst for such a minor hit. I was told it was a pinch but the tire is on barely 2000 miles ..

I am trying to call continental and acura client relations tomorrow; anyone has similar issues or any experience with tire warranty?.. Please help.
 

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I would also check the alignment and make sure there wasn't any suspension damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Called up continental and they say OEM tires have basic coverage only and would not cover road hazards while their replacement tires would have "total confidence plan".. No help from acura client relations either..
 

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Did the sidewall in fact "burst" (I'm picturing a split in the wall of the tire), or did it just break the seal between the bead and wheel?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, there was a split in the wall of the tire.. close to an inch. Can that be classified as a "manufacturing defect" or would it be an "outside factor"? i am using insurance terms..The impact to the curb - they are saying is an outside factor.
 

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Definitely an outside factor. This would be similar to you backing the car into a fence post and claiming the panel that took the impact was defective.

I'm sorry for your troubles, but this one's on you unfortunately. The only benefit here is that your other three tires are in good shape an not half worn. Had they had been half worn you'd probably be looking at replacing at least 1 more tire if not all 4.
 

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Somewhat blunt but this is your fault. If you hit a curb with a tire - any tire on any car - it could well result in the tire bursting and doing so in a way that destroys the tire. This isn't the fault of Acura or Continental and neither s/b expected to pay for your mistake. I don't know why you'd expect them to. Just chalk this up to an expensive lesson to be more careful driving near curbs.

To confess - I did this once some years ago in a rental car. I did it in a car I was driving in Italy where I accidentally hit a curb too hard when pulling along the curb on one of their tiny streets. It surprised me when it hit as hard as it did (due to me not being as careful as I should have been) and it burst and destroyed the tire. Amazingly, I happened to do it almost in front of a small tire shop so I was able to buy a new tire (at expensive European prices) and end up on my way again. As a result of that experience I'm 'still' extra mindful of curbs so in the end it was just a somewhat costly lesson.

I second the above advice to have the alignment checked as well as the steering components since ramming a curb hard enough to blow a tire has the possibility of doing suspension damage or knocking it out of alignment. This doesn't always happen but there's a chance. If it's out of alignment and you keep driving it that way you'll wear the tires extra fast in addition to not tracking straight so it's not worth skipping this step.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I agree with you and thanks for being honest. Yeah, it is definitely an expensive lesson. More than the cost I am shocked this happened on new tires for my new car :frown2:

Time to slow down and be extra cautious at curbs now... I was not anticipating that the tires would be so delicate...I am talking about entering from main road into parking lots where the sidewalk curb is graded down for entry.. (curb cut).

I understand Acura would not be paying but was hoping Continental would cover as I read their coverage info about "total confidence plan" yesterday. But came to know that OEM tires have basic coverage but their replacement tires would have the total plan which includes road hazard coverage.

Somewhat blunt but this is your fault. If you hit a curb with a tire - any tire on any car - it could well result in the tire bursting and doing so in a way that destroys the tire. This isn't the fault of Acura or Continental and neither s/b expected to pay for your mistake. I don't know why you'd expect them to. Just chalk this up to an expensive lesson to be more careful driving near curbs.

To confess - I did this once some years ago in a rental car. I did it in a car I was driving in Italy where I accidentally hit a curb too hard when pulling along the curb on one of their tiny streets. It surprised me when it hit as hard as it did (due to me not being as careful as I should have been) and it burst and destroyed the tire. Amazingly, I happened to do it almost in front of a small tire shop so I was able to buy a new tire (at expensive European prices) and end up on my way again. As a result of that experience I'm 'still' extra mindful of curbs so in the end it was just a somewhat costly lesson.

I second the above advice to have the alignment checked as well as the steering components since ramming a curb hard enough to blow a tire has the possibility of doing suspension damage or knocking it out of alignment. This doesn't always happen but there's a chance. If it's out of alignment and you keep driving it that way you'll wear the tires extra fast in addition to not tracking straight so it's not worth skipping this step.
 

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^^ These low profile higher performance (on-road handling) comfort drive type tires aren't necessarily as strong against road hazards and bumps as some other tires. I've done a lot of 4-wheeling including rock crawling in deserts and mountains (not in the MDX - other vehicles) and those vehicles had tires that were meant to be robust in more extreme conditions by having stiffer sidewalls, not being low profile, etc.

When I hit the curb in Italy I was surprised, probably like you were, at how the relatively non-violent hit was enough to blow the tire. I think it's just a combination of the tire type and how the angle of the hit against the angle of curb, with perhaps the relative rim location coming into play, that causes it to blow at times when other times a similar condition doesn't cause it to blow due to different angles, etc.

The other lesson - this demonstrates why it's a good idea to have a real spare tire of some sort rather than just a can of air which won't inflate a severely damaged tire. Some MDXs don't have a spare - something not all buyers/owners seem to be aware of until they encounter something like this, which is too late.
 
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