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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

Background: My MDX was off the road for almost a year until I could put a new transmission into it. I finally got it back on the road this week.

Driving on local roads at low (sub 40mph) speeds is awesome; Smooth shifting, no issues.

Driving on faster roads is another story.

Once I hit about 45mph, there is a shudder that can be felt everywhere; steering wheel, seat, floor etc. It is not affected by hitting the brakes or gas pedal, and it's there all the way to 70mph (I've not gone any faster than this)

I checked tire pressures, they were all at 32psi, and I increased it to 35psi just in case. No difference.

Tires are all brand new 12 months ago (barely any miles on them); Brakes were overhauled 12 months ago (they did get rusted up during the one-year it was parked up)

Having spent a lot on the transmission I'd like to, at least, troubleshoot this myself.

Also, this may or may not be related, I have the TPMS light on within 5 minutes of starting to drive - it starts unlit, and then comes on, and as stated above, the tire pressures are currently 36psi at each wheel (these pressures were set having driven 20 minutes away, if that makes any difference)

Looking forward to your ideas and suggestions.
 

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Here is my experience with your two symptoms that you may want to check out.

On the shudder, if it feels like you are running over the rumble strip on the side of an interstate, then it may be your torque converter. I had the transmission rebuilt in my 2005 GMC Yukon at 200k miles. A few weeks after we got it back, we started to feel the shudder/rumble at highway speeds (55+) while going up a incline before the transmission downshifted out of 5th. It was diagnosed as a defective torque converter and was replaced under warranty. The problem never returned after that.

On the TPMS light, most likely one or more of your TPMS batteries are dead. Ours were dead and the yellow TPMS light did the same thing...off on startup, turn on after a few minutes of driving. Replacing the TPMS sensors when we replaced the tires solved that problem.

Hope that helps some.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Did you change the trans fluid in the rear differential?
How about the Transfer case fluid?
I believe both of these were changed. I will get clarification.

Maybe a flat spot since your tires have been sitting in the same place so long?
Is this something I can look for myself? I did move it every few weeks, but this is definitely possible.

Here is my experience with your two symptoms that you may want to check out.

On the shudder, if it feels like you are running over the rumble strip on the side of an interstate, then it may be your torque converter. I had the transmission rebuilt in my 2005 GMC Yukon at 200k miles. A few weeks after we got it back, we started to feel the shudder/rumble at highway speeds (55+) while going up a incline before the transmission downshifted out of 5th. It was diagnosed as a defective torque converter and was replaced under warranty. The problem never returned after that.

On the TPMS light, most likely one or more of your TPMS batteries are dead. Ours were dead and the yellow TPMS light did the same thing...off on startup, turn on after a few minutes of driving. Replacing the TPMS sensors when we replaced the tires solved that problem.

Hope that helps some.
I will ask about the torque converter. Your description is close - it's no where near as profound as the rumble strip - in fact it's really quite minor, but it's noticeable, and my previous car was a Jeep Grand Cherokee with VERY bad death wobble, so the slightest wobble in the steering wheel gets my immediate attention (because in a JGC with DW, if you don't react you're in for a treat.... and by treat I mean a sweat inducing issue!)

Thanks for the TPMS info.
 

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Could be an alignment issue. If they disconnected the struts from the knuckles to get the tranny out, the camber could be way off. Or maybe something else got tweaked during the R/R process.

Of course, I have to wonder if you're not dealing with a TC shudder issue. Hope not, though hopefully it'll be in warranty for you. If not, I've heard good things about the LubGard Shudder Fixx (sic). I've had good luck with their other products, and have read good things about this, too. I really don't get paid from LubeGard, or own stock in the company, BTW. ;-)

I have had a number of Jeeps, including my current '96 XJ Cherokee. It had a HORRIBLE death wobble, even with a rebuilt front end (all the links, tie rod ends, ball joints, steering stabalizer, etc.). Ended up being a bad shock (it was nearly new, but had a dent on the inside from off-road fun, and had a "dead spot" that allowed the DW to begin). The problem is that the front ends in the live axle Jeeps are more or less designed to break into death wobble unless everything is working right. It DOES get your attention - I've had Jeep owners ask if the shimmy they feel is death wobble, and will tell them, "if you have to ask, it's not DW". ;-)
 

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A few more ideas. First and second are from experience with my 06. Third and fourth are plain guesses.

Front lower control arm bushings - esp the donut shaped one which is closest to the driver and passenger. Maybe the lower ball joint. The bushing are a simple visual inspection for cracking. Turn the wheels to get a better view.

Tire balance. Easy, inexpensive to have a tire shop spin them. If tires are pretty new, maybe the shop that put them on will check/rebalance for free.

Sticking/rusted pads or parking brake. Drive for a few miles and check if any of the wheels feel hotter than the others. Even better with a non contact thermometer.

Stuck/tight/worn shocks/struts.
 

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A few more ideas. First and second are from experience with my 06. Third and fourth are plain guesses.

Front lower control arm bushings - esp the donut shaped one which is closest to the driver and passenger. Maybe the lower ball joint. The bushing are a simple visual inspection for cracking. Turn the wheels to get a better view.

Tire balance. Easy, inexpensive to have a tire shop spin them.

Stuck/tight/worn shocks/struts.
Highway speeds most pronounced 55-70mph shudder felt through steering wheel and vibration felt throughout car. I replaced both front struts and rear shock then had I had the brakes done. This was about 6 years ago. Problem persists to this day. I just installed all new rotors, calipers and pads as one of the calipers had frozen. During install took a look at the front lower control arm bushings. The large horizontal donut closest to the fire wall was visibly torn on both sides. You can buy a complete front end kit with two lower control arms, ball joints and inner and outer tie rods and I think new sway bar end links from Moog. It's cheaper and easier to just replace the arm than try and remove and press in a new bushing. Not a overly hard job to do yourself if you have jack stands and the tools.
 
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