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Discussion Starter #22
Magnuffin, thanks for the tip, I knew there was a reason to take this job slow. I did tighten those bolts a bit because I thought they might be leaking.

Gray silicone, is that a special automotive type? I think I only have normal clear silicone at home right now, is there anything else that can be used?
 

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Magnuffin, thanks for the tip, I knew there was a reason to take this job slow. I did tighten those bolts a bit because I thought they might be leaking.

Gray silicone, is that a special automotive type? I think I only have normal clear silicone at home right now, is there anything else that can be used?
I just use the grey rtv sealant. Pull that one, clean and coat threads.
 

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I had the pleasure of learning as I was rebuilding through trial and error and research so I'll put this out there for whomever may stumble across it. When you have an oil or coolant leak like the one described you would be well advised to reseal pretty much the entire front end of the engine as it's rather cheap and much less annoying to pull it all apart once rather than 5-6 times. The after market kits are cheap and come with everything you'll need including a new water pump, I would just recommend using actual Honda Bond sealant and Honda gaskets. Getting all the way down to the timing belt is nothing more than removing bolts, bolts, and more bolts. Just make sure you put the bolts right back in the hole they came out of once you get whatever part you're working on off, also make sure you drop the exhaust from the manifold and the oil pan. Having it all taken apart leaves you with not alternative other than putting it all back together, which will keep you from saying screw it as you get tired and funned out. There are not hidden secrets, it's just removing bolts and replacing gaskets, make sure you use a torque wrench and following the tightening sequence because all the bolts are aluminum and are designed to snap in half if pressure is put on them incorrectly. Remember that the gasket or sealant is what is going to seal the parts not trying to tighten them to 1000 pounds. What keeps the bolts from loosening is again not the overall pressure but a drop of lock tight one every bolt you touch, the book recommends red (there is red and blue, red is maximum strength). You'll want to clean all the mating surfaces with a dremel polishing wire wheel, super fine sand paper, or steel wool, then spray it all down with degreaser then wipe it down with rubbing alcohol. The super fine scratches left behind will actually help the Honda Bond seal to the surface. If you know you have a front end leak, spend a month or two collecting all the after market kits and then take your time and do all the repairs at the same time. Go slow and take your time and you'll be surprised how aggravated you won't get.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Ace,

Thanks for the question, I should have followed up. The coolant leak was definitely from the water pump, after I cleaned everything up and replaced it there has been no more leaking. With the new timing belt, serpentine belt, idle pulley and tensioner there has been no more squealing either. I replaced them at the same time as I was concerned the coolant leaking onto them shortened their remaining life.

I didn't go any further to drop the oil pan and replace all of the seals like Twistedsteel suggested, but his advice is probably not a bad idea if you have the time.


Jordan, how did your leak fix turn out? Did everything turn out ok after you put it back together?
 

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Ace,

Thanks for the question, I should have followed up. The coolant leak was definitely from the water pump, after I cleaned everything up and replaced it there has been no more leaking. With the new timing belt, serpentine belt, idle pulley and tensioner there has been no more squealing either. I replaced them at the same time as I was concerned the coolant leaking onto them shortened their remaining life.

I didn't go any further to drop the oil pan and replace all of the seals like Twistedsteel suggested, but his advice is probably not a bad idea if you have the time.
Jordan,
The process I mentioned is referred to as rehousing the oil pump. The oil pump uses both gaskets and sealant to keep things from leaking. There's an o-ring inside the oil pan that needs to be replaced when it's done, the oil pan itself only uses sealant to reseal. Just remember that when it starts leaking oil you'll have to pull half the stuff you already had off back off to get to it, lol,
 

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Ace,

Thanks for the question, I should have followed up. The coolant leak was definitely from the water pump, after I cleaned everything up and replaced it there has been no more leaking. With the new timing belt, serpentine belt, idle pulley and tensioner there has been no more squealing either. I replaced them at the same time as I was concerned the coolant leaking onto them shortened their remaining life.

I didn't go any further to drop the oil pan and replace all of the seals like Twistedsteel suggested, but his advice is probably not a bad idea if you have the time.
Thanks for the reply, I just wondered if that fixed the issue because it sounded like it would.
 
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