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It is pretty easy as the Bearing is part of the Hub so it's a matter of removing the 4 bolts that hold it to the knuckle and swap the whole thing.
I haven't personally done this to my X but I've seen the setup when I did my rear brakes.. Should be a walk in the park if you are a regular diyer.
 

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Depends on how much rust you have, You will be replacing the entire Hub combo so the only part that needs to pop off is the hub from the knuckle. Spray some penetrating lube to the back portion of the hub but if rust is too thick you will need the puller, I would use a rubber hammer first.
 

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If your question is that you need a puller to remove the bearing from the Hub carrier then depends on how you get the replacement part.. AFAIK they only sell the entire hub+bearing combo unit not the bearing by itself.
 

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Parts diagram shows the bearing by itself:

https://www.oemacuraparts.com/auto-...-automatic-engine/chassis-cat/rear-brake-scat

Due to the age of the vehicle, you will probably be dealing with rust. The removal is a 2 step operation. First you have to remove the bearing from the knuckle, then you have to remove the hub from the bearing.

Not an easy DIY project, IMO.

If you disconnect the whole assembly (Knuckle with bearing and hub) and take it to a machine shop, they can press/pull the parts and install the new bearing.
 

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Been there twice, on a 2001 back in 07, and a 2005 last year. Both were the front bearings, so I'm surprised one of your rear bearings gave out ahead of the fronts. But, the knuckle and hub is basically the same design front and rear.

Timken and NTN.
They are the oem supplier for Acura MDX bearings and if you google the proper keywords, you'll find the Timken part # which is the oem match for your 2003. The price difference for me was $42 Timken, $62 NTN and $122 Honda, and yes the NTN bearing logo and part# stamping was identical on both old and new bearing.

This is was my 5th sealed bearing job among various vehicles, and the most difficult, simply due to the pressures involved in the shear size of the bearing and knuckle.

I used a Hub Tamer, and a part of the tool assembly deformed before the bearing unfroze. I upgraded to the Hub Grappler and there wasn't enough juice from the impact wrench. So I went and got the Earthquake XT and blasted it with 150psi. It was enough, but the pressure applied destroyed the largest sleeve. There was so much force involved, the bent sleeve was hot when I removed it. The bearing wouldn't move.

I gave up on the "Use this tool and you won't need to remove the knuckle or perform an alignment after bearing replacement." I know what I'm doing as I've done it several times before, but these two Acura MDX were just tough. I got a 12 ton traditional press and used the sleeves and press tools from the bearing kits and the hub came right off. So buy or rent an upright 12 ton, buy or borrow from free from an auto parts store, a bearing press kit.

That's only half the issue. The inner race will remain on the hub spindle and you'll hate yourself trying to get it off. I watched a few youtube videos, tried different strategies, and decided that using a grinder to cut a diagonal groove deep into the collar of the inner race works best, then use a chisel to hammer it sideways and the whole sleeve will bust apart from circumferential pressure. Watch a few vids and you'll see what I mean.

Use the outer race of the old bearing as an exact fitting press collar to press in the new race. Be careful not to over do it. I killed one bearing by not understanding the precise pressure points to apply. It takes a lot of pressure to press it all the way in, but if you go even 10 lbs too much past bottoming out, you will end up pressing out the inner race and destroying the new bearing. It is important to use a press tool which avoids making contact with the inner race, or the visible rubber seal. You must press on only the outer race, which is why you need to use the old bearing to press in the new bearing. The lip is only 1mm wide, so its important to find exacting matches for your press tool parts. Get it in just enough to accommodate the snap ring.

Parts Geek has the OEM supply rear bearing available. If its the rear rather than the front you are you doing, I strongly suggest that you do all 4 bearings at once. Not because its easy but because its so painful that you might as well get them all done while you have all the right tools out and your brain is in the swing of it.

Don't buy the $424 Hub Grappler, its fickle based on the application. The grip and press points are limited to whatever odd shape your knuckle is produced. Its cheaper and more effective to buy a harbor freight upright press (add caster wheels from home depot to roll it around, the caster wheel shanks at harbor freight do not fit right). Also buy their bearing press kit. The hydraulic press and bearing kit are both $100-125. Oh, you might as get their 3/4 in. Ball Joint Separator (uses a press bolt, this is not a pickle fork) so that you can do the front bearings at the same time.

To remove the axle nut, its best to use a high powered impact wrench rather than fight with a long extension breaker bar. Be sure to buy new spindle nuts for all corners. They are not re-usable.
 

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oh, while you have the rear wheels off and are messing with the suspension, you might as well do the rear sway bar bushings. They are only $6 a piece but a hassle to do. I've got a recent post on doing the front and rear bushings with some pics, you'll find if you do a search.
 

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I've seen a wheel bearing replacement operation before and it didn't much time to know that I didn't want anything to do with it in my home garage!

I had to get one rear wheel bearing replaced on the MDX. I just took it to my trusted mechanic. The part was about $100 with labour at 3 hours for the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
well the quote I got for this job was over 500 bux at the garage.i bought the new bearing and retainer for under 100 bux and dove into the job at 6pm Friday night.thank god my bud is actually a really good mechanic and he basically did the whole job for me in 4 hours.this is something I would not tackle at home without a lift and a decent press.now I just have to talk him into doing the other 3.
 

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well the quote I got for this job was over 500 bux at the garage.i bought the new bearing and retainer for under 100 bux and dove into the job at 6pm Friday night.thank god my bud is actually a really good mechanic and he basically did the whole job for me in 4 hours.this is something I would not tackle at home without a lift and a decent press.now I just have to talk him into doing the other 3.

So, where you able to talk him into doing the other three bearings?

Usually I provide unlimited pizza (by delivery) and their choice of craft beer. They keep working, you keep feeding them . . . til its done.


What method did he employ to remove the stuck-on inner race from the hub?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I put a bit of heat on the stuck race and got it moving then scored it with a grinder.came off pretty easy.have not tackled the other 3 bearings yet because I smoked the transmission last sunday.should be back from the garage this week sometime,
 
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