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Old 01-07-2013, 02:31 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Rear brake replacement - DIY

I didn't see any recent posts on this and I just completed the job so I thought I would give the members my own experience. I have an '08 Tech with 63,000 miles. Brakes were all the factory installed. Rear pads were at 2mm.

Follow this post at your own risk:

I bought Centric rotors and ceramic pads from Tire Rack. Shipped they were $150.

Lifted the rear of the vehicle and placed on jack stands.

Removed wheels.

Removed the two rotor retaining screws after striking them with a hammer and applying penetrating oil.

Removed two guide pin bolts holding the caliper and pads using 14mm (?) socket

Removed the caliper and pads from the caliper carrier

Removed the two larger bolts (17mm socket) holding the caliper carrier in place

I found it useful to apply penetrating oil on all of the above. They came right off.

Removed the caliper carrier.

Removed the rotor.

Sprayed everything with brake cleaner and scrubbed all metal with wire brush.

Replaced pads in caliper using the new shims and wear indicator provided by Centric.

Adjusted the e-brake shoe using the wheel located at the 6 o'clock position on the wheel hub. Must spin in a counter-clockwise direction to tighten the e-brake.

Placed new rotor on the wheel hub

Replaced rotor retaining screws.

Lined up the large hole in rotor hub with the e-brake adjustment wheel.

Spun adjustment wheel until I could not move the rotor anymore, then backed it off a bit spinning the adjustment the other direction until the rotor moved freely again

Removed the rubber plug from the old rotor hub and placed it in the hole in new rotor

Replace caliper carrier. Tighten bolts.

Replace caliper and new pads. Tighten bolts.

Replace road wheel.

Repeat the same for other side.

Torque all lug nuts and road test.
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Old 01-07-2013, 02:51 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Nice! Thanks.
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:35 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Your welcome. Really easy job. My dealer wanted $550 dollars for it, which is actually not a bad price given the price of the Acura parts and the time spent doing the job. I decided to save the cash and do it myself.
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:33 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Nice.......would have been even nicer with some pics

Did you really need to replace the rotors? Did you feel some vibrations when braking?
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:16 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Do you need a special tool to compress / twist the caliper back in on the rears? I know on the fronts you can just push it back in place.
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:55 AM   #6 (permalink)
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No "special" tools needed. The only tools I used for the job were socket wrenches, a pad spreader to push the piston back into the caliper (you can also use large groove joint pliers) and a screw driver to turn the e-brake adjustment nut. I also put a little anti-seize compound on the fasteners when replacing them and some anti-squeak paste on the caliper contact points to the back of the pads for good measure. Not required, just an old habit.
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Old 01-08-2013, 10:56 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Bimmer, thanks for taking the time to write this up! One issue I would strongly disagree with is the using of anti-seize on any of the brake fasteners; I would actually recommend theadlocker. There is a belief that threadlocker will prevent corrosion between the bolt and carrier such that is is more easily removed at a later date which I suspect is your concern for using anti-seize.fficeffice" />>>
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I seem to recall that BMW called for threadlocker on the caliper carrier bolts (can't recall on the caliper pins) as did my old Merkur back in the day (perhaps a German thing?). Not sure about Honda/Acura, but I think it is a good practice. >>
>>
Naked bolts would be better than anti-seize in my opinion. >>
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Old 01-08-2013, 11:01 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Sorry, seems some formatting gibberish got trapped in my message above:

Bimmer, thanks for taking the time to write this up! One issue I would strongly disagree with is the using of anti-seize on any of the brake fasteners; I would actually recommend theadlocker. There is a belief that threadlocker will prevent corrosion between the bolt and carrier such that is is more easily removed at a later date which I suspect is your concern for using anti-seize.

I seem to recall that BMW called for threadlocker on the caliper carrier bolts (can't recall on the caliper pins) as did my old Merkur back in the day (perhaps a German thing?). Not sure about Honda/Acura, but I think it is a good practice.

Naked bolts would be better than anti-seize in my opinion.
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:16 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Like I said, anti-seize compound is not required - just a personal preference thing and a habit.
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:29 PM   #10 (permalink)
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With a name like Bimmerdrvr I assume your other car is a BMW. What are you driving?

I also have an x3 and frequent the Bimmerfest board. I've done the brakes for both and they are both really easy except for the rotor retaining screws on the MDX
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:40 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CODOG2 View Post
With a name like Bimmerdrvr I assume your other car is a BMW. What are you driving?

I also have an x3 and frequent the Bimmerfest board. I've done the brakes for both and they are both really easy except for the rotor retaining screws on the MDX
You got it. I drive an E46 M3. It is my track car. I also have a Honda Pilot.

I found the Acura brake parts easier to work with than my ///M. The retaining screws on the MDX rotors came off easily with a few blows of a hammer, penetrating oil and using an impact driver with a snuggly fit Phillips head. That said, I was paranoid about stripping it based on a terrible experience I had on my M which involved drilling out the retaining hex bolt.
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Old 08-25-2014, 02:44 AM   #12 (permalink)
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this really help. thanks.
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Old 08-26-2014, 02:59 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Thanks Bimmer for the write up. I recently purchased a 12 Tech for my wife and plan to do most of the maintenance myself. This thread will help with that.

Concerning Centric parts, I just bought and installed Centric rotors (their premium offerings) front and rear on my 2004 Ford F150 and was impressed with the quality when I received them (painted where possible to prevent unsightly rust) and they are performing well so far.

As far as using anti-seize or thread locker (I would stress blue, not red) on the bolts, I guess we all have theories on that. Mine is that one should clean the bolt threads with a wire brush and clean out the threaded hole with a bore brush and blow out with air. As I am somewhat of a torque spec stickler, I don't want lubrication to interfere with proper torquing. Like you said, this is just the way "I" like to do it. I'm sure we are all adequately "bolted up" when it is all said and done.

Thanks again for taking the time for the write up.
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